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dc.contributor.authorRees, Emma L. E.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T11:56:03Z
dc.date.available2017-12-06T11:56:03Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-30
dc.identifier.citationGloriana’s Queer Skull: The Matter of Life and Death in The Revenger’s Tragedy, Anglistik: International Journal of English Studies, 28 (2), 2017: 77 -85. ISSN 0947-0034.en
dc.identifier.issn0957-0034
dc.identifier.otherNA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620740
dc.description.abstractIn this essay I ask whether The Revenger’s Tragedy paradoxically – perversely, even – shows a woman, Gloriana, in a position of absent presence and impotent power. Is it always the role of the memento mori to serve a higher purpose? Or does Middleton’s play merely show the desecration of a woman, both before and after death? Is there, in Middleton’s play, a kind of immortality brought about by the tenacious stage presence accorded to Gloriana’s skull? I read Gloriana’s (non)presence as epitomising Judith Butler’s work on gender as performance; even as preceding language. It is a reading that allows a way in to thinking about the apparently genderless skull’s distinctive onstage agency. Further, it is Gloriana’s skull or – more properly, here, Gloriana-as-skull – that vigorously challenges and changes plot, plotting, cultural expectations, and fixity, in a way that Gloriana’s living body never could.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversitatsverlag Winter Heidelbergen
dc.relation.urlhttps://angl.winter-verlag.de/article/ANGL/2017/2/8en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectRenaissanceen
dc.subjectRevengeen
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.subjectskullen
dc.subjectButleren
dc.subjectJacobeanen
dc.subjectdramaen
dc.subjectGlorianaen
dc.titleGloriana’s Queer Skull: The Matter of Life and Death in 'The Revenger’s Tragedy’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalAnglistik International Journal of English Studiesen
dc.date.accepted2016-07-01
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-09-30
html.description.abstractIn this essay I ask whether The Revenger’s Tragedy paradoxically – perversely, even – shows a woman, Gloriana, in a position of absent presence and impotent power. Is it always the role of the memento mori to serve a higher purpose? Or does Middleton’s play merely show the desecration of a woman, both before and after death? Is there, in Middleton’s play, a kind of immortality brought about by the tenacious stage presence accorded to Gloriana’s skull? I read Gloriana’s (non)presence as epitomising Judith Butler’s work on gender as performance; even as preceding language. It is a reading that allows a way in to thinking about the apparently genderless skull’s distinctive onstage agency. Further, it is Gloriana’s skull or – more properly, here, Gloriana-as-skull – that vigorously challenges and changes plot, plotting, cultural expectations, and fixity, in a way that Gloriana’s living body never could.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2017-09-30
dc.date.deposited2017-12-06


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