Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLafferty, Moira E.*
dc.contributor.authorWakefield, Caroline*
dc.contributor.authorRyan, David*
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T10:35:06Z
dc.date.available2017-12-06T10:35:06Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationLafferty, M.E., Wakefield, C., Ryan D. (2017). "For the love of the game”: The hidden mental health consequences of sport teams’ initiations.en
dc.identifier.issnOther
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620738
dc.descriptionConference abstracten
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Objectives: Initiations events, often referred to as welcome activities, are commonplace traditions in many sports teams. The short and long-term impact on the mental health of initiates, initiators and bystanders has been a focus of recent research attention. The present study aimed to explore the initiation experiences of UK student athletes and the subsequent effect on well-being. Design: Cross-sectional qualitative design using retrospective interviews. Methods: Sixteen sport team members were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted exploring participant experiences of welcome activities in their university sport teams. Results were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Six themes emerged from the data. These were: rite of passage; challenges; rules; reputation; persuasion and hierarchy. These themes were mapped onto the non-relational maltreatment conceptual framework that includes physical, social and emotional elements of bullying. In contrast to U.S. based studies, the results indicated that social bullying was the most prevalent, followed by emotional, and finally physical bullying. Conclusions: The study highlighted the occurrence of physical, social and emotional bullying during the initiation activities of sports’ teams. Furthermore, reference was made to the natural time progression in university sport that perpetuates the cycle of bullying and establishes the initiates as future initiators. For initiates who successfully negotiate the events, the effects of the bullying are minimised. However, for some this bullying can have serious mental health impacts both in the short and long term, whilst the challenges and risk behaviours may threaten the broader well-being of all involved.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Psychological Societyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectinitiationsen
dc.subjectsporten
dc.subjectmental healthen
dc.title“For the love of the game”: The hidden mental health consequences of sport teams’ initiationsen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester, Liverpool Hopeen
dc.date.accepted2017-08-30
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderNAen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectQR Grant, Lafferty 2016/17en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-31
refterms.dateFCD2019-09-18T11:59:41Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-18T11:59:56Z
html.description.abstractAbstract: Objectives: Initiations events, often referred to as welcome activities, are commonplace traditions in many sports teams. The short and long-term impact on the mental health of initiates, initiators and bystanders has been a focus of recent research attention. The present study aimed to explore the initiation experiences of UK student athletes and the subsequent effect on well-being. Design: Cross-sectional qualitative design using retrospective interviews. Methods: Sixteen sport team members were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted exploring participant experiences of welcome activities in their university sport teams. Results were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Six themes emerged from the data. These were: rite of passage; challenges; rules; reputation; persuasion and hierarchy. These themes were mapped onto the non-relational maltreatment conceptual framework that includes physical, social and emotional elements of bullying. In contrast to U.S. based studies, the results indicated that social bullying was the most prevalent, followed by emotional, and finally physical bullying. Conclusions: The study highlighted the occurrence of physical, social and emotional bullying during the initiation activities of sports’ teams. Furthermore, reference was made to the natural time progression in university sport that perpetuates the cycle of bullying and establishes the initiates as future initiators. For initiates who successfully negotiate the events, the effects of the bullying are minimised. However, for some this bullying can have serious mental health impacts both in the short and long term, whilst the challenges and risk behaviours may threaten the broader well-being of all involved.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
DSEP abstract 2017.pdf
Size:
13.46Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Abstract

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/