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dc.contributor.authorVincent, Alana M.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-20T16:13:21Z
dc.date.available2017-10-20T16:13:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-05
dc.identifier.citationVincent, A. (2018). Ecclesiasticus, War Graves, and the secularization of British Values. Journal of the Bible and its Reception, 4(2).en
dc.identifier.issn2329-4434
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/jbr-2017-0014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620672
dc.description.abstractThis article reads the design of the British Imperial War Graves cemeteries in the context of the religious pluralism of the late Empire. Reviewing the deliberations of the design committee and parliamentary debates on the design of the cemeteries, it notes that the Christian character of the cemeteries was relatively muted, a design decision which caused no small amount of public and political controversy, but which permitted the cemeteries to present an image of a unified Empire. The paper argues that the choice of quotations specifically from the apocrypha was an important and deliberate aspect of this presentational strategy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDe Gruyter
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jbr.2017.4.issue-2/jbr-2017-0014/jbr-2017-0014.xmlen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.subjectWar gravesen
dc.subjectEcclesiasticusen
dc.subjectCommonwealthen
dc.subjectPluralismen
dc.subjectMemorialsen
dc.titleEcclesiasticus, War Graves, and the secularization of British Valuesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Bible and its Receptionen
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1515/jbr-2017-0014
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-01-05
html.description.abstractThis article reads the design of the British Imperial War Graves cemeteries in the context of the religious pluralism of the late Empire. Reviewing the deliberations of the design committee and parliamentary debates on the design of the cemeteries, it notes that the Christian character of the cemeteries was relatively muted, a design decision which caused no small amount of public and political controversy, but which permitted the cemeteries to present an image of a unified Empire. The paper argues that the choice of quotations specifically from the apocrypha was an important and deliberate aspect of this presentational strategy.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-01-05
dc.dateAccepted2017-08-03
dc.date.deposited2017-10-20


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