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dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Shelia C.*
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Tessa E.*
dc.contributor.authorMac Cana, Pól S. S.*
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Robert C.*
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, William I.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-13T15:51:00Z
dc.date.available2017-03-13T15:51:00Z
dc.date.issued04/03/2014
dc.identifier.citationGeorge, S. C., Smith, T. E., Mac Cana, P. S., Coleman, R., & Montgomery, W. I. (2014). Physiological stress in the Eurasian badger (Meles meles): effects of host, disease and environment. General and Comparative Endocrinology, 200, 54-60. DOI: 10.1016/j.ygcen.2014.02.017
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ygcen.2014.02.017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620433
dc.description.abstractA method for monitoring hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) responses of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) to stressors was validated by measuring cortisol excretion in serum and faeces. Serum and faecal samples were collected under anaesthesia from live-captured, wild badgers and fresh faeces was collected from latrines at 15 social groups in County Down, Northern Ireland. Variation in levels of cortisol in wild badgers was investigated relative to disease status, season, age, sex, body mass, body condition and reproductive status and environmental factors that might influence stress. Faecal cortisol levels were significantly higher in animals testing culture-positive for Mycobacterium bovis. Prolonged elevation of cortisol can suppress immune function, which may have implications for disease transmission. There was a strong seasonal pattern in both serum cortisol, peaking in spring and faecal cortisol, peaking in summer. Cortisol levels were also higher in adults with poor body condition and low body mass. Faecal samples collected from latrines in grassland groups had significantly higher cortisol than those collected from woodland groups, possibly as a result of greater exposure to sources of environmental stress. This study is the first to investigate factors influencing physiological stress in badgers and indicates that serological and faecal excretion are valid indices of the HPA response to a range of stressors.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016648014000690en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectGlucocorticoidsen
dc.subjectEurasian badgeren
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectBovine tuberculosisen
dc.subjectFacealen
dc.titlePhysiological stress in the Eurasian badger (Meles meles): Effects of host,en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1095-6840
dc.contributor.departmentQueens University of Belfast, UK; University of Chester, UK
dc.identifier.journalGeneral and Comparative Endocrinologyen
dc.date.accepted2014-02-16
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderDepartment of Agriculture and Rural Development, Northern Irelanden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDepartment of Agriculture and Rural Development, Northern Irelanden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-03-04
refterms.dateFCD2019-07-17T08:51:57Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T16:24:02Z
html.description.abstractA method for monitoring hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) responses of the Eurasian badger (Meles meles) to stressors was validated by measuring cortisol excretion in serum and faeces. Serum and faecal samples were collected under anaesthesia from live-captured, wild badgers and fresh faeces was collected from latrines at 15 social groups in County Down, Northern Ireland. Variation in levels of cortisol in wild badgers was investigated relative to disease status, season, age, sex, body mass, body condition and reproductive status and environmental factors that might influence stress. Faecal cortisol levels were significantly higher in animals testing culture-positive for Mycobacterium bovis. Prolonged elevation of cortisol can suppress immune function, which may have implications for disease transmission. There was a strong seasonal pattern in both serum cortisol, peaking in spring and faecal cortisol, peaking in summer. Cortisol levels were also higher in adults with poor body condition and low body mass. Faecal samples collected from latrines in grassland groups had significantly higher cortisol than those collected from woodland groups, possibly as a result of greater exposure to sources of environmental stress. This study is the first to investigate factors influencing physiological stress in badgers and indicates that serological and faecal excretion are valid indices of the HPA response to a range of stressors.


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