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dc.contributor.authorMullen, Thomas*
dc.contributor.authorTwist, Craig*
dc.contributor.authorHighton, Jamie M.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T09:13:13Z
dc.date.available2017-02-09T09:13:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-31
dc.identifier.citationMullen, T., Twist, C., & Highton, J. (2017). Influence of Knowledge of Task Endpoint on Pacing and Performance During Simulated Rugby League Match Play. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 12(9), 1192-1198. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0603
dc.identifier.issn1555-0265
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijspp.2016-0603
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620363
dc.descriptionAs accepted for publication
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the influence of knowledge of exercise duration on pacing and performance during simulated rugby league match play. Methods: Thirteen male university rugby players completed 3 simulated rugby league matches (RLMSP-i) on separate days in a random order. In a control trial, participants were informed that they would be performing 2 × 23-min bouts (separated by 20 min) of the RLMSP-i (CON). In a second trial, participants were informed that they would be performing 1 × 23-min bout of the protocol but were then asked to perform another 23-min bout (DEC). In a third trial, participants were not informed of the exercise duration and performed 2 × 23-min bouts (UN). Results: Distance covered and high-intensity running were higher in CON (4813 ± 167 m, 26 ± 4.1 m/min) than DEC (4764 ± 112 m, 25.2 ± 2.8 m/min) and UN (4744 ± 131 m, 24.4 m/min). Compared with CON, high-intensity running and peak speed were typically higher for DEC in bout 1 and lower in bout 2 of the RLMSP-i, while UN was generally lower throughout. Similarly, DEC resulted in an increased heart rate, blood lactate, and rating of perceived exertion than CON in bout 1, whereas these variables were lower throughout the protocol in UN. Conclusions: Pacing and performance during simulated rugby league match play depend on an accurate understanding of the exercise endpoint. Applied practitioners should consider informing players of their likely exercise duration to maximize running.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.humankinetics.com/journal/ijsppen
dc.subjectPacingen
dc.subjectRugby leagueen
dc.titleInfluence of Knowledge of Task Endpoint on Pacing and Performance During Simulated Rugby League Match Playen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1555-0273
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performanceen
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0603
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-31
html.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the influence of knowledge of exercise duration on pacing and performance during simulated rugby league match play. Methods: Thirteen male university rugby players completed 3 simulated rugby league matches (RLMSP-i) on separate days in a random order. In a control trial, participants were informed that they would be performing 2 × 23-min bouts (separated by 20 min) of the RLMSP-i (CON). In a second trial, participants were informed that they would be performing 1 × 23-min bout of the protocol but were then asked to perform another 23-min bout (DEC). In a third trial, participants were not informed of the exercise duration and performed 2 × 23-min bouts (UN). Results: Distance covered and high-intensity running were higher in CON (4813 ± 167 m, 26 ± 4.1 m/min) than DEC (4764 ± 112 m, 25.2 ± 2.8 m/min) and UN (4744 ± 131 m, 24.4 m/min). Compared with CON, high-intensity running and peak speed were typically higher for DEC in bout 1 and lower in bout 2 of the RLMSP-i, while UN was generally lower throughout. Similarly, DEC resulted in an increased heart rate, blood lactate, and rating of perceived exertion than CON in bout 1, whereas these variables were lower throughout the protocol in UN. Conclusions: Pacing and performance during simulated rugby league match play depend on an accurate understanding of the exercise endpoint. Applied practitioners should consider informing players of their likely exercise duration to maximize running.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2017-10-31
dc.dateAccepted2017-01-19
dc.date.deposited2017-02-09


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