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dc.contributor.authorEllery, William N.*
dc.contributor.authorGrenfell, Suzanne E.*
dc.contributor.authorGrenfell, Michael C.*
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Rebecca*
dc.contributor.authorKotze, Donovan C.*
dc.contributor.authorMarren, Philip M.*
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Jasper*
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-01T10:13:59Z
dc.date.available2017-02-01T10:13:59Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-23
dc.identifier.citationEllery, W. N., Grenfell, S. E., Grenfell, M. C., Powell, R., Kotzee, D. C., Marren, P. M., Knight, J. (2016). Wetlands in southern Africa: a geomorphic threshold perspective. In J. Knight, & S. Grab (Eds.), Quaternary Environmental Change in Southern Africa: Physical and Human Dimensions (pp. 188–202). Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781107055797
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620341
dc.description.abstractIn southern Africa, wetlands of different types are an integral part of the drainage network, yet evolve and are sensitive to different combinations of geologic, climatic, geomorphic, edaphic and hydrologic controls. Understanding of these controls can help in the interpretation of environmental and climatic records from different wetland types, given that wetland sensitivity to environmental and climatic changes may vary throughout their ‘life cycle’. The chapter discusses inland wetland records from dated sites in South Africa in order to consider their significance for reconstructing late glacial and Holocene climates; and the relationship of wetlands to preservation of the Pleistocene archaeological record. Wetlands are sensitive to degradation under contemporary environmental and climatic changes, which may impact on their hydrological and ecological function as well as the integrity of associated archaeological sites.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/geomorphology-and-physical-geography/quaternary-environmental-change-southern-africa-physical-and-human-dimensions?format=HBen
dc.subjectWetlandsen
dc.subjectGeomorphologyen
dc.subjectQuaternaryen
dc.subjectHoloceneen
dc.subjectClimate changeen
dc.subjectHydrologyen
dc.titleWetlands in southern Africaen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentRhodes University (Ellery, Powell); University of the Western Cape (Grenfell, S; Grenfell, M); University of Natal (Kotze); University of Melbourne (Marren); University of the Witwatersrand (Knight)en
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-06-23
html.description.abstractIn southern Africa, wetlands of different types are an integral part of the drainage network, yet evolve and are sensitive to different combinations of geologic, climatic, geomorphic, edaphic and hydrologic controls. Understanding of these controls can help in the interpretation of environmental and climatic records from different wetland types, given that wetland sensitivity to environmental and climatic changes may vary throughout their ‘life cycle’. The chapter discusses inland wetland records from dated sites in South Africa in order to consider their significance for reconstructing late glacial and Holocene climates; and the relationship of wetlands to preservation of the Pleistocene archaeological record. Wetlands are sensitive to degradation under contemporary environmental and climatic changes, which may impact on their hydrological and ecological function as well as the integrity of associated archaeological sites.
rioxxterms.publicationdate2016-06-23
dc.dateAccepted2015-03-31
dc.date.deposited2017-02-01


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