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dc.contributor.authorWells, Mary*
dc.contributor.authorKing, Emma*
dc.contributor.authorToft, Kate*
dc.contributor.authorMacAulay, Fiona*
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Joanne*
dc.contributor.authorDougall, Nadine*
dc.contributor.authorHulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.*
dc.contributor.authorBoa, Sally*
dc.contributor.authorSlaven, Eleanor*
dc.contributor.authorCowie, Julie*
dc.contributor.authorMcGarva, John*
dc.contributor.authorNiblock, Patricia G.*
dc.contributor.authorPhilp, Julie*
dc.contributor.authorRoe, Justin*
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-09T08:53:06Z
dc.date.available2016-08-09T08:53:06Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-04
dc.identifier.citationWells, M., et. al. (2016). Development and feasibility of a Swallowing intervention Package (SiP) for patients receiving radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer—the SiP study protocol. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 2(1):40. DOI: 10.1186/s40814-016-0079-6en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40814-016-0079-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/618064
dc.description.abstractBackground Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and the functional, psychological and social consequences of HNC cancer and its treatment can be severe and chronic. Dysphagia (swallowing problems) affects up to two thirds of patients undergoing combined chemoradiotherapy. Recent reviews suggest that prophylactic swallowing exercises may improve a range of short- and long-term outcomes; however, the importance of psychological and behavioural factors on adherence to swallowing exercises has not been adequately studied. This study aims to develop and test the feasibility of a Swallowing intervention Package (SiP) designed in partnership with patients, speech and language therapists (SLTs) and other members of the head and neck multi-disciplinary team (MDT), for patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Methods/design This feasibility study uses quantitative and qualitative research methods, within a quasi-experimental design, to assess whether patients will tolerate and adhere to the SiP intervention, which aspects of the intervention can be implemented and which cannot, whether treatment fidelity can be achieved across different contexts, whether study processes and outcome measures will be feasible and acceptable and to what extent the intervention is likely to have an impact on swallowing dysfunction and quality of life. Patients are being recruited from five sites in Scotland and England (three interventions and two usual care). The SLT based in the relevant intervention centre teaches the exercise programme and provides supporting materials. A combination of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), adherence measures and clinical swallowing assessments are used prior to intervention (baseline), at the end of treatment, 3 and 6 months post-treatment. Discussion This collaborative study has taken a unique approach to the development of a patient-centred and evidence-based swallowing intervention. The introduction of an e-SiP app provides an exploration of the use of technology in delivering this intervention. The study provides an opportunity to examine the feasibility of delivering and participating in a supported swallowing intervention across several different NHS sites and will provide the evidence needed to refine intervention and study processes for a future trial. Trial registration NCRI portfolio, 18192 & 20259
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://pilotfeasibilitystudies.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40814-016-0079-6en
dc.subjectDysphagiaen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectHead and necken
dc.subjectInterventionen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.subjectStudy protocolen
dc.titleDevelopment and feasibility of a Swallowing intervention Package (SiP) for patients receiving radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer—the SiP study protocolen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2055-5784
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Stirling; NHS Lothian; NHS Tayside; City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust; University of Chester; Srathcarron Hospice; NHS Greate Glasgow and Clyde; NHS Forth Valley; NHS Fife; The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trusten
dc.identifier.journalPilot and Feasibility Studiesen
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s).
dc.date.updated2016-08-04T06:05:33Z
dc.date.accepted2016-07-07
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-08-04
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T21:45:32Z
html.description.abstractBackground Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and the functional, psychological and social consequences of HNC cancer and its treatment can be severe and chronic. Dysphagia (swallowing problems) affects up to two thirds of patients undergoing combined chemoradiotherapy. Recent reviews suggest that prophylactic swallowing exercises may improve a range of short- and long-term outcomes; however, the importance of psychological and behavioural factors on adherence to swallowing exercises has not been adequately studied. This study aims to develop and test the feasibility of a Swallowing intervention Package (SiP) designed in partnership with patients, speech and language therapists (SLTs) and other members of the head and neck multi-disciplinary team (MDT), for patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Methods/design This feasibility study uses quantitative and qualitative research methods, within a quasi-experimental design, to assess whether patients will tolerate and adhere to the SiP intervention, which aspects of the intervention can be implemented and which cannot, whether treatment fidelity can be achieved across different contexts, whether study processes and outcome measures will be feasible and acceptable and to what extent the intervention is likely to have an impact on swallowing dysfunction and quality of life. Patients are being recruited from five sites in Scotland and England (three interventions and two usual care). The SLT based in the relevant intervention centre teaches the exercise programme and provides supporting materials. A combination of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), adherence measures and clinical swallowing assessments are used prior to intervention (baseline), at the end of treatment, 3 and 6 months post-treatment. Discussion This collaborative study has taken a unique approach to the development of a patient-centred and evidence-based swallowing intervention. The introduction of an e-SiP app provides an exploration of the use of technology in delivering this intervention. The study provides an opportunity to examine the feasibility of delivering and participating in a supported swallowing intervention across several different NHS sites and will provide the evidence needed to refine intervention and study processes for a future trial. Trial registration NCRI portfolio, 18192 & 20259


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