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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Lisa*
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-28T09:27:06Z
dc.date.available2016-07-28T09:27:06Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.citationJohnson, L. (2015). Investigating morphometrics, movement and oviposition in the Lissotriton and Triturus newts. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/617674
dc.descriptionA reference copy of this work is available at the Seaborne Library, Learning and Information Services, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester, CH1 4BJ
dc.description.abstractThis thesis focuses on the UK pond newts, the smaller bodied species known as Lissotriton newts and the larger Triturus. The primary aims were to identify and address gaps in the current Tritus/Lissotriton literature; to provide a more complete understanding of this group as many assumptions about morphology and physiology exist untested, for example that larger/fatter females will lay more eggs. Specifically for Lissotriton helveticus, many assumptions are based on the similarly sized Lissotriton vulgaris, potentially missing any species specific differences. A further focus of the work was to provide a clearer view over the whole breeding season; using measures of condition over a season and egg-laying.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chester
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectmorphometricsen
dc.subjectmovementen
dc.subjectovipositionen
dc.subjectnewtsen
dc.titleInvestigating morphometrics, movement and oviposition in the Lissotriton and Triturus newtsen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.description.advisorHosie, Charlotteen
html.description.abstractThis thesis focuses on the UK pond newts, the smaller bodied species known as Lissotriton newts and the larger Triturus. The primary aims were to identify and address gaps in the current Tritus/Lissotriton literature; to provide a more complete understanding of this group as many assumptions about morphology and physiology exist untested, for example that larger/fatter females will lay more eggs. Specifically for Lissotriton helveticus, many assumptions are based on the similarly sized Lissotriton vulgaris, potentially missing any species specific differences. A further focus of the work was to provide a clearer view over the whole breeding season; using measures of condition over a season and egg-laying.


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