Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAledavood, Talayehen
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Eduardoen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Sam G. B.en
dc.contributor.authorReed-Tsochas, Felixen
dc.contributor.authorMoro, Estebanen
dc.contributor.authorDunbar, Robin I. M.en
dc.contributor.authorSaramäki, Jarien
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-01T17:20:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-01T17:20:18Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05en
dc.identifier.citationAledavood, T., Lopez, E., Roberts, S. G. B., Reed-Tsochas, F., Moro, E., Dunbar, R. I. M. & Saramäki, J. (2016). Channel-specific daily patterns in mobile communication. Proceedings of European Conference on Complex Systems 2014, pp209-218. Springer International Publishing: Switzerlanden
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-29226-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/611411en
dc.description.abstractHumans follow circadian rhythms, visible in their activity levels as well as physiological and psychological factors. Such rhythms are also visible in electronic communication records, where the aggregated activity levels of e.g. mobile telephone calls or Wikipedia edits are known to follow their own daily patterns. Here, we study the daily communication patterns of 24 individuals over 18 months, and show each individual has a different, persistent communication pattern. These patterns may differ for calls and text messages, which points towards calls and texts serving a different role in communication. For both calls and texts, evenings play a special role. There are also differences in the daily patterns of males and females both for calls and texts, both in how they communicate with individuals of the same gender vs. opposite gender, and also in how communication is allocated at social ties of different nature (kin ties vs. non-kin ties). Taken together, our results show that there is an unexpected richness to the daily communication patterns, from different types of ties being activated at different times of day to different roles of channels and gender differences.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springer.com/jp/book/9783319292267en
dc.subjectMobile telephone communicationen
dc.subjectdaily rhythmsen
dc.subjectcomputational social scienceen
dc.titleChannel-specific daily patterns in mobile communicationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.internal.reviewer-noteEmailed reader to see if they have another version of the item without proofing marks. 7-4-16 GMen
rioxxterms.funderxen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectxen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
html.description.abstractHumans follow circadian rhythms, visible in their activity levels as well as physiological and psychological factors. Such rhythms are also visible in electronic communication records, where the aggregated activity levels of e.g. mobile telephone calls or Wikipedia edits are known to follow their own daily patterns. Here, we study the daily communication patterns of 24 individuals over 18 months, and show each individual has a different, persistent communication pattern. These patterns may differ for calls and text messages, which points towards calls and texts serving a different role in communication. For both calls and texts, evenings play a special role. There are also differences in the daily patterns of males and females both for calls and texts, both in how they communicate with individuals of the same gender vs. opposite gender, and also in how communication is allocated at social ties of different nature (kin ties vs. non-kin ties). Taken together, our results show that there is an unexpected richness to the daily communication patterns, from different types of ties being activated at different times of day to different roles of channels and gender differences.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
aledavood_2015_channel specific ...
Embargo:
2216-01-01
Size:
553.0Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record