Now showing items 1-20 of 1024

    • For a Zemiology of Politics

      Davis, Howard; White, Holly; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Sage Publications, 2022-09-09)
      A zemiology of politics is required in the face of disastrous historic, contemporary and future social harms. Focusing on state-led politics, the article charts some politically generated or mediated social harms: military; ecological and economic. These can generate justificatory narratives of zemiogenic deceit and ignorance. In a contemporary political moment of authoritarian populism, nativism and racism, each feature as part of wider processes towards the corruption and destruction of politics. The article then suggests some of the potentials of healthy politics and fundamental principles for a zemiology of politics including: subordination of crime-centric criminology to a historically grounded international zemiology, the incorporation of agnotological perspectives, and an orientation that is public, inclusive, reflexive and non-fundamentalist.
    • From Physical to Virtual: Reflections on the Move from the Lecture Hall to the Digital Classroom

      Lafferty, Moira E.; Roberts, Emma; University of Chester; Aberystwyth University
      This chapter describes our reflections on the lived experiences during the rapid pivot to Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) in March 2020. Drawing on the narratives of academics from two disciplines – Law and Psychology, we focus on the Continuing Professional Learning and Development (CPLD) offered in the immediate aftermath of the initial UK lockdown. We further describe the support available to staff as they scaffolded and supported students through the transition to online learning. Such students, although accustomed social digital users, were less skilled in digital learning, having chosen to study in-person within a physical campus-based institution. We conclude by making recommendations for sustainable training and development as we move towards the implementation of a blended learning experience for campus learners.
    • Addressing gender inequalities

      Healey, Ruth L; Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester
      Everyone has a gender identity. Consequently, we all experience the world through a ‘gendered’ perspective. Yet there are significant inequalities in people’s life experiences as a result of their gender. This article explores the impact of some of these gender inequalities and how we might work to address them.
    • Spirituality and Mental Health across Cultures

      Loewenthal, Kate Miriam; orcid: 0000-0001-7667-7809 (Informa UK Limited, 2022-08-23)
    • Evaluation of the good night out campaign: a sexual violence bystander training programme for nightlife workers in England

      Quigg, Zara; Ross-Houle, Kim; Bigland, Charlotte; Bates, Rebecca; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester (Springer, 2022-08-16)
      Abstract Aim Sexual violence is global public health, human rights and gender equality issue. Sexual violence bystander programmes for nightlife workers are emerging across a few countries and further examination of such programmes is required. This exploratory study evaluates the potential effectiveness of the Good Night Out Campaign, a sexual violence bystander programme for nightlife workers. Subject and methods Two hundred and seven trainees attending the 1.5 hour training programme across two cities in England were recruited opportunistically, immediately prior to training delivery. Sexual violence myth acceptance and readiness and confidence to intervene in sexual violence were measured at baseline and post-intervention. Analyses used paired-sample tests to examine differences in the three measurements pre to post-training and effect sizes were quantified using Cohen’s d. Results Compared to pre-training, post-training participants were significantly (p<0.001) less likely to agree with sexual violence myths, and more likely to be confident and ready to intervene in sexual violence or incidents of vulnerability. Erect sizes were small–medium. Conclusions The study adds to emergent evidence suggesting that sexual violence bystander programmes may be promising in decreasing sexual violence myths and barriers to bystander intervention, and increasing willingness to intervene amongst nightlife workers. Findings can support the emergence of sexual violence prevention activities implemented in nightlife spaces. Further programme implementation and evaluation using experimental designs is needed to explore outcomes in greater depth, considering the complexity of the nightlife environment.
    • The benefits of hindsight: Lessons learnt from leading my first cross-department student-staff partnership project

      Healey, Ruth L; University of Chester
      Student-staff partnerships have been shown to offer significant potential for enhancing learning and teaching in higher education, however, they are not without their challenges. This paper reflects on my experience of leading a team in our first cross-department student-staff partnership project, which focused on the curriculum design, identifying five key lessons that were learnt from the experience. Despite the challenges faced in this project this did not lessen the success of the project in terms of the production of four successful modules, and the act of undertaking the project and introducing colleagues to partnership practice has enhanced the capacity for partnership across the department.
    • Life-long learning: life beyond the training

      Lafferty, Moira E.; Tod, David; University of Chester; Liverpool John Moores
      If education can be described as “the kindling of a flame not the filling of a vessel” (Plutarch, nd), attainment of a formal sport psychology practice qualification and Health Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration should represent the point at which the kindling fire is fully ignited and kept alight through lifelong learning. The following chapter discusses the applied Sport Psychologist’s lifelong learning journey describing the inter-related areas of Continued Professional Development and education. Through the framework of Kneebone (2020) the journey to expert practitioner is examined and personal stories from practitioners are used to explore stages in their lifelong learning and create guidelines for sport psychologists.
    • The British Psychological Society Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology (Stage 2)

      Eubank, Martin; Lafferty, Moira E.; Breslin, Gavin; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester; Ulster University
      This chapter discusses the British Psychological Society’s Stage 2 Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology. The first section of the chapter outlines the purpose, aims and requirements of the qualification. This includes details of the entry requirements for the qualification, a summary of the four key qualification competencies that trainees are expected to develop, and how the qualification provides a professional training route to Chartered Psychologist and Registered Sport and Exercise Psychologists status. The second section of the chapter outlines the qualification enrolment process, and discusses the importance and role of supervision, with tips about how to find the right supervisor and maximise the benefits of supervision. The third section of the chapter discusses the qualification assessment process and the methods used to assess trainee competency. The chapter is supported throughout by reflections from trainees, supervisors and assessors on the qualification, who share their experience of the process and provide top tips for future trainees looking to undertake the qualification to become appropriately qualified to work as a Sport and Exercise Psychologist.
    • Ruth Healey

      Healey, Ruth L.; MacFarlane, Martina; University of Chester; University of Calgary
      Interview Summary: • Ruth Healey discusses student-staff partnerships and the opportunities created by digital education. • Ruth is excited about the benefits she has seen from the University of Chester’s (UoC) remodelling of course structures and is hopeful that the ‘Chester Blend’ Model will carry on post-pandemic to continue providing an enriched learning environment for both students and staff. • Ruth’s pedagogy is to create a space where students can use class time to identify their interests within the topic area they are studying, and develop their ideas while also learning from others through discussion and collaboration.
    • Identifying and reviewing the key literature for your assignment

      Healey, Ruth L.; Healey, Mick; University of Chester; University of Gloucestershire
      Identifying the most relevant, up-to-date and reliable references is a critical stage in the preparation of a whole range of assessments at university, including essays, reports, projects and dissertations, but it is a stage which is often rushed and unsystematic. As Boell and Cecez-Kecmanovic (2014: 257) argue: “The quality and success of scholarly work depends in large measure on the quality of the literature review process.” This chapter is designed to help you improve the quality of your literature search and your written review of the literature, both of which are key elements in undertaking a research project and writing an essay (West et al., 2019). This chapter is organized into the following sections: • The purpose of searching the literature • Making a start • Framing your search • Managing your search • Search tools • Evaluating the literature • Writing the literature review
    • Teaching geography for social transformation

      Wellens, Jane; Berardi, Andrea; Chalkley, Brian; Chambers, Bill; Healey, Ruth; Monk, Janice; Vender, Jodi; University of Leicester; Open University; University of Plymouth; University of Sheffield; University of Arizona; Pennsylvania State University
      This paper considers how higher education geography is a discipline that can make a significant contribution to addressing inequality and engaging with the agenda for social change. It adopts the view that the teaching of geography can promote social transformation through the development of knowledge, skills and values in students that encourage social justice and equity. The paper explores how teaching about social transformation is closely interlinked with teaching for social transformation and considers some of the pedagogical approaches that might be used to achieve these. It considers how the lack of diversity of higher education geography teachers impacts on these issues before moving on to consider how the nature of different higher education systems supports or constrains geographers’ abilities to teach for social transformation. Finally, the paper ends by asking individuals and geography departments to consider their commitment to teaching for social transformation.
    • “It’s not just a man’s world” – Helping female sport psychologists to thrive not just survive. Lessons for supervisors, trainees, practitioners and mentors.

      Lafferty, Moira E; Coyle, Melissa; Prince, Hannah R.; Szabadics, Adrienn; University of Chester; Plymouth Marjon University; Glasgow Caledonian University; Buckingham New University (The British Psychological Society, 2022-09-01)
      In the following article we present composite narratives of female sport and exercise psychologist’s (SEPs) reflections of working as practitioners in situations where they have faced sexism and a culture of toxic masculinity. We discuss the impact both professionally and personally of these experiences and look at what lessons can be learned from the sharing of these narratives. We conclude by offering our thoughts on how these negative shared experiences can be used in a positive way to inform culture change, educate supervisors of the challenges and be woven into supervision so female practitioners feel empowered and supported.
    • Who goes where in couples and pairs? Effects of sex and handedness on side preferences in human dyads

      Rodway, Paul; Schepman, Astrid; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2022-06-21)
      There is increasing evidence that inter-individual interaction among conspecifics can cause population-level lateralization. Male-female and mother-infant dyads of several non-human species show lateralised position preferences, but such preferences have rarely been examined in humans. We observed 430 male-female human pairs and found a significant bias for males to walk on the right side of the pair. A survey measured side preferences in 93 left-handed and 92 right-handed women, and 96 left-handed and 99 right-handed men. When walking, and when sitting on a bench, males showed a significant side preference determined by their handedness, with left-handed men preferring to be on their partner’s left side and right-handed men preferring to be on their partner’s right side. Women did not show significant side preferences. When men are with their partner they show a preference for the side that facilitates the use of their dominant hand. We discuss possible reasons for the side preference, including males preferring to occupy the optimal ‘fight ready’ side, and the influence of sex and handedness on the strength and direction of emotion lateralization.
    • An exploration of the differences and similarities between Counselling and Confession, as experienced by Counsellors who are, or have been, Catholic Priests.

      Devassia, Jinson; Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester; Teofilo Kisanji University (Taylor and Francis, 2021-11-22)
      This research sought to examine the question, “what are the similarities and differences between counselling and Confession?”, by exploring the experiences of five Catholic priests, who are also qualified counsellors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five participants, who each have a minimum of five years of experience in both counselling and the Catholic priesthood. The data was analysed using Thematic Analysis. The research found that there are some similarities between the sacrament of Confession and the practice of counselling. These are that both practices involve being empathetic, unconditional, non-judgemental, keeping confidence, and careful listening. There are also clear differences between the two practices, the main differences being their intention and faith context. Both counselling and Confession deal with similar ‘human’ struggles, are understood using different languages (theology and psychology), have a different intention, but contribute much comfort to many who are seeking peace.
    • The effects of sex and handedness on masturbation laterality and other lateralised motor behaviours

      Rodway, Paul; Thoma, Volker; Schepman, Astrid; University of Chester; University of East London (Taylor and Francis, 2021-11-26)
      Masturbation is a common human behaviour. Compared to other unimanual behaviours it has unique properties, including increased sexual and emotional arousal, and privacy. Self-reported hand preference for masturbation was examined in 104 left-handed and 103 right-handed women, and 100 left-handed and 99 right-handed men. Handedness (modified Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, EHI), footedness, eyedness, and cheek kissing preferences were also measured. Seventy nine percent used their dominant hand (always/usually) for masturbation, but left-handers (71.5%) were less consistently lateralised to use their dominant hand than right-handers (86.5%). Hand preference for masturbation correlated more strongly with handedness (EHI), than with footedness, eyedness, or cheek preference. There was no difference in masturbation frequency between left and right-handers, but men masturbated more frequently than women, and more women (75%) than men (33%) masturbated with sex aids. For kissing the preferred cheek of an emotionally close person from the viewer’s perspective, left-handers showed a left-cheek preference, and right-handers a weaker right-cheek preference. The results suggest that hemispheric asymmetries in emotion do not influence hand preference for masturbation but may promote a leftward shift in cheek kissing. In all, masturbation is lateralised in a similar way to other manual motor behaviours in left-handed and right-handed men and women.
    • The General Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence Scale (GAAIS): Confirmatory Validation and Associations with Personality, Corporate Distrust, and General Trust

      Schepman, Astrid; Rodway, Paul; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2022-06-14)
      Acceptance of Artificial Intelligence may be predicted by individual psychological correlates, examined here. Study 1 reports confirmatory validation of the General Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence Scale (GAAIS) following initial validation elsewhere. Confirmatory Factor Analysis confirmed the two-factor structure (Positive, Negative) and showed good convergent and divergent validity with a related scale. Study 2 tested whether psychological factors (Big Five personality traits, corporate distrust, and general trust) predicted attitudes towards AI. Introverts had more positive attitudes towards AI overall, likely because of algorithm appreciation. Conscientiousness and agreeableness were associated with forgiving attitudes towards negative aspects of AI. Higher corporate distrust led to negative attitudes towards AI overall, while higher general trust led to positive views of the benefits of AI. The dissociation between general trust and corporate distrust may reflect the public’s attributions of the benefits and drawbacks of AI. Results are discussed in relation to theory and prior findings.
    • Nature, Nurture, (Neo-)Nostalgia? Back-casting for a more socially and environmentally sustainable post-COVID future

      Collins, Rebecca; Welsh, Katharine; Rushton, Megan; Cliffe, Anthony; Bull, Eloise; University of Chester; Newcastle University (Taylor and Francis, 2022-07-27)
      Commentaries on lived experiences of COVID-19-induced ‘lockdown’ have simultaneously directed public imaginations backwards to draw inspiration and fortitude from historical periods of national and global challenge, and forwards into futures characterised by greater environmental sensitivity and community resilience. In this article we argue that individuals’ and households’ practical coping strategies from different phases of lockdown within the UK offer clues as to how adaptive embodiments of close connection – to nature and community – both inform contemporary practices of everyday resilience and signpost towards enablers of a more socially compassionate and environmentally sustainable future. Our novel approach to conceptualising post-COVID recovery draws on ‘back-casting’ – an approach which envisages pathways towards alternative, ‘better’ futures – to work back from the notion of sustainable lifestyles, through participants’ narratives of coping in/with lockdown, to the forms of adaptation that provided solace and encouragement. We highlight how these embodied and emotional adaptations constitute a form of nascent ‘neo-nostalgia’ capable of reaching beyond the enabling of coping mechanisms in the present to inform long-lasting capacity for individual and community resilience in the face of future socio-environmental crises.
    • Mental Wellbeing and Boosting Resilience to Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Critical Narrative Review

      Beckstein, Amoneeta; Chollier, Marie; Kaur, Sangeeta; Ghimire, Ananta R.; Fort Lewis College; University of Chester; GHU Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Paris; Emerging Journey Asia; Uniglobe College (SAGE Publications, 2022-05-28)
      The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc globally. Besides devastating physical health consequences, the mental health consequences are dire as well and are predicted to have a long-term impact for some individuals and communities and society as a whole. Specific keywords were entered into various popular databases at three points in time (June 2020, April 2021, and February 2022). Articles about COVID-19 that focused on mental health and/or discussed improving resilience/coping were reviewed by the authors. A total of 119 publications were included. The pandemic is certainly a chronic stressor for many people, and some may be traumatized in the aftermath which may lead to stress-related disorders. The psychological impacts of this stress and trauma are reported and findings presented around three key themes: mental health impact, impact in the workplace, and improving resilience. In addition, particularly vulnerable populations are discussed and some of the violence and inequities they might face. Resilience literature offers keys to promoting positive mental wellbeing during and after the pandemic. Being able to effectively respond to the heterogeneity of specific situations while building resilience is addressed. Prevention, preparedness, Psychological First Aid training, and trauma informed practice can all contribute to building resilience and promoting peri/post-traumatic growth at all levels of society. This narrative review provides an overview of the literature on mental health and resilience in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors propose that, through the use of the accumulated empirical knowledge on resilience, we can mitigate many of the most damaging outcomes. Implications for mental health professionals, policy suggestions, and future research directions are explored.
    • “The Fruit of Consultation” – Co-production as a solution to the challenges of safeguarding children and young people in International Christian work, findings from an online survey.

      Oakley, Lisa; Lafferty, Moira; McFarlane, Leigh; Thirtyone:eight; University of Chester (Wiley, 2022-06-15)
      Incidents of child abuse such as the Oxfam case in 2010 of sexual abuse of children by volunteers’ and cases of abuse in orphanages by high risk overseas volunteers have highlighted the need for the development of effective safeguarding in the international context. This is of equal importance for faith-based organisations (FBOs) who, like non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are obligated to create safe spaces for their beneficiaries. This paper reports the findings from an online survey conducted in 2019, which was completed by 72 participants, 39 were representatives from organisations based in the UK which support individuals to engage in International Christian Work (ICW), 33 were individuals who are or have been engaged in ICW in the last three years. The online survey collected qualitative data, which was analysed using reflexive thematic analysis whilst descriptive analytical techniques were employed on the quantitative data. The findings illustrate commitment to safeguarding children and young people in ICW but also the complexities, challenges, and tensions around this. The necessity to work collaboratively with local contexts and co-production was identified as key to developing effective safeguarding practice. These findings have implications beyond faith-based organisations to others working in the international context.
    • Web-based psychological interventions for people living with and beyond cancer: A meta-review of what works and what doesn’t for maximising recruitment, engagement, and efficacy

      Leslie, Monica; Beatty, Lisa; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Pendrous, Rosina; Cartwright, Tim; Jackson, Richard; The Finding My Way UK Trial Steering Group; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J; Edge Hill University; University of Chester; Flinders University; University of Liverpool (JMIR, 2022-07-08)
      Background: Despite high levels of psychological distress experienced by many patients with cancer, previous research has identified several barriers to accessing traditional face-to-face psychological support. In response, web-based psychosocial interventions have emerged as a promising alternative. Objective: This meta-review aimed to synthesise evidence on: (1) recruitment challenges and enablers; (2) factors that promote engagement and adherence to web-based intervention content; and (3) factors that promote the efficacy of web-based psychosocial interventions for cancer patients and survivors. Methods: We conducted a systematic search for previous reviews which have investigated the recruitment, engagement, and efficacy of online and app-based psychosocial interventions in adult cancer populations. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library database for relevant literature. Search terms focussed on a combination of topics pertaining to neoplasms and telemedicine. Two independent authors conducted abstract screening, full-text screening, and data extraction for each identified article. Results: Twenty articles met eligibility criteria. There was inconsistency in the reporting of uptake and engagement data; however, anxiety around technology and perceived time burden were identified as two key barriers. Online psychosocial oncology interventions demonstrated efficacy in reducing depression and stress but reported weak to mixed findings for distress, anxiety, quality of life, and wellbeing. While no factors consistently moderated intervention efficacy, preliminary evidence indicated that multi-component interventions and greater communication with a healthcare professional were preferred by participants and associated with superior effects. Conclusions: Several consistently cited barriers to intervention uptake and recruitment emerged, which we recommend future intervention studies address. Preliminary evidence also supports the superior efficacy of multi-component interventions and interventions which facilitate communication with a healthcare professional. However, a greater number of appropriately powered clinical trials, including randomised trials with head-to-head comparisons, are needed to enable more confident conclusions around which online psychosocial oncology interventions work best and for whom.