• Ageing, veterans and offending: New challenges for critical social work

      Taylor, Paul; Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-01-30)
      The relationship between ageing and the study of veterans of military service who have offended is uncharted territory. What is available to us are accounts operating in disparate areas of ageing and offending and veterans and offending. This has rich implications for ‘critical social work’ to add weight of research and theory to the significance of ageing identities of veterans for professional social work. This has challenges for the knowledge base for a critical social work given the significance of veterans’ identities and experiences.
    • Agenda setting with children using the ‘three wishes’ technique

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O'Reilly, Michelle; Lester, Jessica N.; University of Chester (Sage, 2018-03-15)
      The National Health Service (NHS; UK) offers initial screening appointments for children referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to determine clinical need and assess risk. Conversation analysis was utilised on 28 video-recordings of these assessments, lasting approximately 90 minutes each with a multidisciplinary team. This paper focuses on the agenda setting strategies used to establish relevant goals with children and adolescents; specifically, the technique of offering ‘three wishes’. For example, “if you had three wishes, what would you like to make happen?” In cases where children initially volunteered an assessment-relevant wish, they tended not to articulate further wishes. Non-assessment-relevant wishes (i.e. fantasy wishes, such as being “rich”) were treated as insufficient, with many approaches used to realign establishing assessment relevant goals. Where responses were not institutionally relevant, practitioners undertook considerable discursive work to realign the focus of the three wishes task to assessment relevance. In these cases, the wish responses were treated as irrelevant and tended to be dismissed, rather than explored for further detail. Such work with the children’s contributions has implications for engaging children and child-centred practices.
    • Aggression and conflict management at fusion in spider monkeys

      Aureli, Filippo; Schaffner, Colleen; Liverpool John Moores University ; University of Chester (The Royal Society, 2007-02-20)
      This article discusses fission–fusion dynamics amongst wild spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and how it is mitigated by the use of embraces.
    • Aging and Globalization: A Global Analysis

      Powell, Jason; Khan, Hafiz; University of Chester; Middlesex University (Uchitel Publishing House, 2014-05-10)
      This paper explores the implications of global aging in a global world.
    • Aging and Identity: A Dialogue with Postmodernism

      Powell, Jason; Gilbert, Tony; University of Liverpool; University of Plymouth (Nova Science Publishers, 2009-11-21)
      Viewing aging and identity through the critical lens of both contemporary gerontology theory and postmodernist concepts, the contributing scholars examine a vast range of issues: from disability to clothing; from aging, health and education to social philosophies and meanings of aging; and from auto-ethnographic methodologies to rethinking postmodern theories of aging. These rich examples demonstrate that traditional biomedical models of aging can no longer give universal and totalising views of aging. The key issue of the book is to point to the varied social and cultural representations and experiences of aging and identity formation. The book celebrates the diversity of older people, challenging the bio-medical equation of 'aging as decline' with exciting and alternative theorizations from postmodern gerontology. Further, a postmodern approach helps to debunk and shatter fixed and limited perceptions of aging by advocating an alternative expression of aging; the conceptual and theoretical focus on aging identity illuminates the self is fluid, changeable and dynamic. This book engages social theory with aging identity by analysing the challenges and opportunities afforded to older people in the ‘contemporary age of aging’.
    • The Aging Body

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2013-08-31)
      An examination of biomedical, psychological and social explanation of the human aging body.
    • Aging in Asia

      Powell, Jason; Cook, Ian; University of Chester; Liverpool John Moores University (Nova Science Publishers, 2009-09-28)
      This book focuses on the implications of population aging in Asia. The book discusses the differences in the magnitude of the aged population in different parts of Asia and highlights the perennial concerns of care and support facing older people and their families as Asian societies grapple with the aging population. The array of chapters in this book substantiates these challenges and opportunities afforded to different countries in Asia in light of demographic shifts, which range from an examination of broad issues of support for the aged and policy directions in East and Southeast Asia, to specific concerns relating to older people in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Pakistan, Korea, Bangladesh and Nepal. Population aging across these countries are experiencing increased longevity and a declining birth rate, which is becoming more prevalent. The book explains how, due to changes in population structure, aging will alter trends in the decades ahead in Asia. This book is unique in that the research cited is not only rich on aging experiences across Asia but is an important process in bringing together evocative, engaged and comparative insights as to how we understand complex aging and welfare issues.
    • Aging in China: implications to social policy of a changing economic state

      Chen, Sheying; Powell, Jason; Chen, Sheying; Powell, Jason L. (Springer Verlag, 2012-02-02)
    • Aging in Perspective and the Case of China: Issues and Approaches

      Chen, Sheying; Powell, Jason; University of Chester; Pace University (Nova Science Publishers, 2011-11-21)
      This book explores populational aging in China.
    • Aging, Gender and Crime

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2012-08-15)
      This book explores the issue of crime and its relationship to gender and aging. This is a forgotten area of analysis in disciplines of criminology, gerontology and even in Feminist theorizing. This book begins by exploring the relationships between crime, aging and victimization. The book then moves to assess the main issues associated with understanding imprisonment for older people. The book focuses its attention on gender and its relationship to mental health and institutional psychiatric care. The final part of the book explores the issue of theorizing aging and relationship to crime.
    • Aging, Healthy Families and Narrative Approaches

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Lupine Publishers, 2018-09-21)
      Due to the mounting importance of recent research in the areas of healthy families and aging, the paper assesses the particular relationship between old age, health and family life by means of studying the role of grand-parenting and the way it is perceived by older people, the family, and the society at large. The study applies a narrative approach; hence, telling the meaning of the family and grand parenting through personal stories and public discourse, based on the theory of Michel Foucault. The findings put forth suggest that identities of health and family and grand-parenting are built on multiple grounds, and that therefore theory should be sensitized accordingly, as identities are managed at different levels, for different audiences and at different levels of awareness.
    • Aging, Theory and Globalization

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2013-01-30)
      This book provides a critical reflection on theory, welfare and aging. An examination on how aging appears to be moving from individualization to a globalized world is provided. This is particularly apparent in a move toward neo-liberal discourses of consumerism which artificially appears to indicate a reallocation of attention from responding to welfare problems such as ‘abuse’, for example to an attempt to define what it is to allegedly ‘age positively’ in an era were older people have never had it so good. This trend is happening in western culture and greatly reconstructs both the formal expectations and personal experiences of later life less in terms of welfare but more in terms of leisure. The book is written against the backdrop of such neo-conservative cultural theories in social gerontology.
    • Agnotology and the Criminological Imagination

      White, Holly; Barton, Alana; Davis, Howard; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-11-08)
      In this chapter we reflect upon the concept of ‘agnotology’ and its usefulness for the expansion of a zemiological criminology. Initially presented as an analytical tool in the fields of science and medicine, agnotology explores the social and political underpinnings of forms of ignorance and their role in both generating and securing acquiescence in mass harms and crimes of the powerful. Typically originating within state-corporate symbioses of ideology, policy and practice, ‘crimes of the powerful’ include harms inflicted through health and safety violations, ‘security’, criminal justice, social and economic policies, war, disaster and environmental destruction. In each case real harms are obscured, denied or otherwise neutralised. Two cases of mass harm are presented here as examples. First, we discuss corporate constructed agnosis over the use of asbestos that has allowed corporations to kill hundreds of thousands yet avoid criminal justice. Second, we reflect on the Holocaust and the role of agnosis in this most extreme form of state-generated harm. Despite its scale, and in contrast with the attention from other disciplines, criminology has remained remarkably taciturn about this crime. We conclude that the central zemiological purpose of an imaginative criminology—the understanding of and struggle against major harm—cannot be undertaken without systematic and rigorous attention to ignorance.
    • “All roads lead to Rome”, but “Rome wasn’t built in a day". Advice on QSEP navigation from the ‘Roman Gods’ of assessment!

      Eubank, Martin; Holder, Tim; Lowry, Ruth; Manley, Andrew; Maynard, Ian; McCormick, Alister; Smith, Jenny; Thelwell, Richard; Woodman, Tim; Lafferty, Moira E.; et al. (British Psychological Society, 2019-09-30)
      This article aims to explore assessors’ observations and experiences of QSEP in relation to trainee competence development and demonstration, and help QSEP trainees and supervisors to identify some of the potholes in the road and consider ways to avoid them. Specifically, assessors have written a short review of their QSEP observations and commentary about what they want to see more of in the future. Their views are forthright, but given in good faith in the spirit of providing advice to candidates, and guidance to supervisors, about the nature and scope of QSEP submissions.
    • Alternative salvations?

      Swinton, Valda; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2013)
      In our secular and diverse culture people may be seeking to fill the vacuum that religion played in the lives of preceding generations. The word salvation does conform to a set of beliefs that is set out in the Christian scriptures and the means by which to attain this salvation. This understanding of the nature, grounds, and means of obtaining salvation. This understanding of salvation is grounded uniquely in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This is not the salvation that is experience in counselling training or therapy.
    • Ambivalent storage, multi-scalar generosity, and challenges of/for everyday consumption

      Collins, Rebecca; Stanes, Elyse; University of Chester; University of Wollongong (Taylor and Francis, 2021-09-05)
      Storage plays an important role in domestic practices as a banal yet essential means of practically accomplishing ‘living together’ and caring for people and material ‘stuff’. However, storage and stored things also occupy a provocative and paradoxical place in debates around the sustainability of household consumption. Driven by renewed popular and scholarly attention to ‘decluttering’ and eschewing anything that does not ‘spark joy’, this paper considers the emotional and practical implications of generosity – as both concept and practice – in articulating the sustainability potential in storage and stored things. In so doing we problematise assumptions about ‘clutter’ as unsustainable. Drawing on vignettes from two projects concerned with material consumption in young adulthood, and drawing on – but going beyond – extant framings of geographies of care, we illustrate how shifting spatial and temporal liminalities of storage mediate opportunities to engage in and with different scales of generosity. We argue that spatialities of storage are often less about deferring acts of divestment than they are a space in which to situate materialisations of significant emotional, care-ful(l) connections. We reflect on the implications of storage for sustainable consumption in the home and suggest how future work drawing on geographies of generosity might usefully enrich our understanding.
    • Anti-Politics in the Anthropocene

      Cox, Peter; Revi, Ben; University of Chester (2015-10-31)
      The governing logic of the neoliberal world seeks to impose strict policy outcomes without all the trouble of political debate. Neoliberal governmentality is constructed as ‘apolitical’ or, in James Ferguson’s words, an ‘anti-politics machine’, a function of economic science, conceived by experts (such as independent reserve banks, committees and advisors) whose recommendations determine appropriate social behaviours and methods to encourage their practice. Politicians are judged not on their skill in delivering agreement and compromise, but rather on their skill at delivering balanced budgets and economic growth. This sets up an interesting proposition. When the overwhelming majority of the world’s climate scientists advocate policy to address the threat of climate change, how does neoliberalism react? Counterintuitively, many neoliberal actors have sought to undermine the authority of climate science. This has caused a rift in the governing logic of neoliberalism, as it selectively abandons the 'anti-politics’ positivism it is built on. Therefore, the anthropocene as a mode of understanding could present a discursive challenge to neoliberal hegemony, exposing the paradoxes and contradictions that lie within the anti-politics agenda. We argue, therefore that the nurture of moral political debate is a crucial task of an anthropocene mode of understanding, one already emergent in activist movements. While these movements are frequently characterised as anti-political in themselves, we argue that instead they should be understood as prefigurative of new extensions of democracy.
    • Anti-Psychiatry Movement

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2014-10-22)
      This chapter documents the history of the anti-psychiatry movement. Within the domains of criminal justice and mental health care, critical debate concerning 'care' versus 'control' and 'therapy' versus 'security' is now commonplace. Indeed, the 'hybridisation' of these areas is now a familiar theme. This unique and topical text provides an array of expert analyses from key contributors in the field that explore the interface between criminal justice and mental health. Using concise yet robust definitions of key terms and concepts, it consolidates scholarly analysis of theory, policy and practice. Readers are provided with practical debates, in addition to the theoretical and ideological concerns surrounding the risk assessment, treatment, control and risk management in a cross-disciplinary context. Included in this book is recommended further reading and an index of legislation, making it an ideal resource for students at undergraduate and postgraduate level, together with researchers and practitioners in the field.
    • Anticipatory versus Reactive Spatial Attentional Bias to Threat

      Gladwin, Thomas; Möbius, Martin; McLoughlin, Shane; Tyndall, Ian; University of Chichester; Radboud University; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-05-11)
      Dot-probe or visual probe tasks (VPTs) are used extensively to measure attentional biases. A novel variant termed the cued VPT (cVPT) was developed to focus on the anticipatory component of attentional bias. This study aimed to establish an anticipatory attentional bias to threat using the cVPT and compare its split-half reliability with a typical dot-probe task. A total of 120 students performed the cVPT task and dot-probe tasks. Essentially, the cVPT uses cues that predict the location of pictorial threatening stimuli, but on trials on which probe stimuli are presented the pictures do not appear. Hence, actual presentation of emotional stimuli did not affect responses. The reliability of the cVPT was higher at most cue–stimulus intervals and was .56 overall. A clear anticipatory attentional bias was found. In conclusion, the cVPT may be of methodological and theoretical interest. Using visually neutral predictive cues may remove sources of noise that negatively impact reliability. Predictive cues are able to bias response selection, suggesting a role of predicted outcomes in automatic processes.
    • Antipsychiatry

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-03-01)
      A historical mapping of the development and influence of the antipsychiatry perspective