• Factors Associated with Intentional and Unintentional Non-adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy Following Breast Cancer

      Brett, Jo; Fenlon, Deborah F.; Boulton, Mary; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Walter, Fiona M.; Donnelly, Peter; Lavery, Bernadette; Morgan, Adrienne; Morris, Carolyn; Watson, Eila; et al. (Wiley, 2016-11-30)
      Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) following breast cancer is known to be sub-optimal despite its known efficacy in reducing recurrence and mortality. This study aims to investigate factors associated with non-adherence and inform the development of interventions to support women and promote adherence. A questionnaire survey to measure level of adherence, side effects experienced, beliefs about medicine, support received and socio-demographic details was sent to 292 women 2-4 years post breast cancer diagnosis. Differences between non-adherers and adherers to AET were explored, and factors associated with intentional and unintentional non-adherence are reported. Approximately one quarter of respondents, 46 (22%), were non-adherers, comprising 29 (14%) intentional non-adherers and 17 (8%) unintentional non-adherers. Factors significantly associated with intentional non-adherence were: the presence of side effects (p<0.03), greater concerns about AET (p<0.001), and a lower perceived necessity to take AET (p<0.001). Half of the sample (105/211) reported that side effects had a moderate or high impact on their quality of life. Factors associated with unintentional non-adherence were: younger age (<65), (p<0.001), post-secondary education (p=0.046), and paid employment (p=0.031). There are distinct differences between intentional non-adherence and unintentional non-adherence. Differentiation between the two types of non-adherence may help tailor support and advice interventions
    • Factors that may continue to impact a mother’s emotional wellbeing once her child’s treatment for cancer has completed and their implications for ongoing support

      Hill, Lynda; Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester; The Joshua Tree Foundation (SAGE, 2020-05-03)
      This research explores factors that may continue to impact a mother’s emotional wellbeing once her child’s treatment for cancer has completed. Research indicates that, contrary to a general expectation of experiencing joy as treatment ends, some families experience very mixed emotions, with fear playing a large part, both leading up to treatment completion and, for some, continuing post-treatment. However, there is no literature that explores a mother’s emotional wellbeing after a number of years’ post-treatment. This research is a contribution towards addressing that deficit. Five mothers were interviewed using semi-structured questions to gather data relating to their specific lived experiences. These were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Results indicate that although end of treatment was longed for, there continues to be much uncertainty and fear post-treatment, and this can continue years after treatment has ended. Mothers described changes within themselves (e.g. new attitudes to living) and a need to adapt to a ‘new normal’. There were elements of grief for the loss of family life with which they were once so familiar. There was also a strong sense of wanting to support others, so that their own experiences weren’t wasted. All participants recognised that further counselling support for themselves would be beneficial.
    • Falling into an abyss: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of the lived experiences of the parents of autistic daughters in the UK

      Reeves, Andrew; Chollier, Marie; Chantrey, Lucy (University of Chester, 2021-11)
      Whilst research increasingly focuses on autism in girls, there is a dearth of literature around the experience of parenting an autistic daughter in the UK, with the few studies that do focusing only on mothers. The data was gathered through in-depth semi-structured interviews that explored the lived experience of parenting an autistic daughter for six mothers and two fathers, from their first concerns, through to the diagnosis, with life in-between and beyond. Their daughters were aged between eleven and seventeen at diagnosis and were diagnosed within the UK. IPA was used to analyse the data. Five superordinate themes were identified: Journey to diagnosis; Negotiating systems; Psychological impact; Living with an autistic daughter; and Reflections. The research demonstrates that the parents of autistic daughters find themselves seeking professional advice and support for a pervasive condition that, whilst better known for its familiar male presentation, appears invisible in its female form to all but those in their close family. The impact of the ensuing struggle to have their concerns believed and to obtain her autism diagnosis often has profoundly negative consequences, leaving families in crisis, chaos in daily life, and parents’ mental and physical health compromised. The subsequent delay in diagnosis means that their daughter remains unsupported in her education and social life, with the adverse ramifications of this reverberating throughout her family. The findings of this study have implications for parents, professionals, and the field of research in terms of the need for a better recognition and understanding of female autism, an apposite educational setting, and a holistic approach to family support.
    • Family-friendly working: The role of the Sex Discrimination Act

      Davies, Chantal; University of Chester (2008-10)
      This article discussed how the Sex Discrimation Act 1975 can be used by employees to request flexible and family-friendly working hours.
    • Fashion

      Harrison, Katherine; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-03-28)
      An edited book chapter discussing the role of fashion and style in the social construction of deviance.
    • Fashion acolytes or environmental saviours? When will young people have had ‘enough’?

      Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-10-01)
      In the global north, high rates of material consumption show few signs of abating, despite oft-repeated warnings of dire social and environmental consequences. Environmental educators have identified young people as a potentially effective group of change agents, capable of driving a transformative shift in how we consume. Yet this picture of the young environmental ‘saviour’ is at odds with many Western young people’s thirst for the ‘latest’ fashions and trends. This chapter explores how young people themselves make sense of this apparent contradiction. Exploring under-researched questions around young people’s conceptualisations of, and affective and embodied responses to, the notion of ‘enough’, it highlights the cultural and contextual factors which could prove decisive in positioning the notion of ‘enough’ centrally in a sustainability-compatible youth material culture.
    • Fear of cancer recurrence in oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients: An investigation of the clinical encounter

      Ozakinci, Gozde; Swash, Brooke; Humphris, Gerry; Rogers, Simon; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; University of St Andrews; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Wiley-Blackwell, 2017-10-12)
      Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is common among individuals treated for cancer. Explorations of how this fear is expressed within an oncology setting and responded to are currently lacking. The aim was to investigate how head and neck cancer survivors in follow-up consultations express FCR, how a health care professional addresses recurrence fears, and examining how survivors experience this interaction. We recorded the follow-up consultations of those participants who have reported FCR as a concern on the Patient Concerns Inventory. We also conducted a follow-up phone interview with the participants. We analysed the transcripts using thematic analysis. Five men and six women were recruited, aged 55-87 (mean age = 64). Follow-up consultation analyses revealed that the consultant used ‘normalising FCR,’ ‘reassurance,’ and ‘offer of referral to a counsellor’. Interviews revealed themes around how they coped with FCR, relevance of personal history on FCR, and the impact of feeling gratitude towards the consultant on expression of FCR. Analyses indicate that patients may feel reluctant to raise their FCR with their clinician for fear of appearing ‘ungrateful’ or of damaging a relationship that is held in high esteem. Findings indicate the initiation of FCR with patients can be beneficial for patient support.
    • Feminist social theory

      Powell, Jason; Coventry University (NOVA Publishers, 2014-02-01)
      This book examines the rise and consolidation of feminist insights into contemporary social theory.
    • Field-based pedagogies for developing learners' independence

      Fuller, Ian; France, Derek; Massey University, University of Chester (Edward Elgar, 2019-12-30)
      For fieldwork to be effective in fostering independent thinking it requires careful design and alignment within the degree programme (Fuller et al., 2006; Fuller, 2012). In this chapter we draw from our own research evidence and experience to provide examples that illustrate how fieldwork can be successfully embedded in the geography undergraduate curriculum from first to final year adopting specific pedagogies to develop, enhance, and refine students as independent learners throughout their undergraduate career.
    • Fieldwork Going Digital

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University, New Zealand; University of Chester, UK (Elsevier, 2014-12-01)
      This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      Haigh, Martin; France, Derek (Informa UK Limited, 2018-09-09)
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      France, Derek; Haigh, Martin; University of Chester; Oxford Brookes University (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-09)
      Fieldwork is the most powerful learning invitation in the toolkit of Geographical Education. This review of papers in The Journal of Geography in Higher Education (JGHE) suggests seven modes in the development of fieldwork. These are arrayed as a kind of historical, perhaps evolutionary, sequence but most remain current in Geography fieldwork practice. At the far end (1960s) of the sequence are didactic modes that are teacher centred and use the field as an adjunct to the classroom, in the middle (1990s) are modes that involve active learning and focus on the development of students as investigators and at the near end (2010s) are those that centred on the field study area and its qualities, that involve concern about the ethics of student engagement and that employ blended learning technologies. The review charts the JGHE’s gradual shift away from its original, almost exclusively, UK-focus toward something rather more international and inclusive. Fieldwork is where Geographers learn “from doing” Geography to “do” Geography. Its special attributes include providing experiential, sometimes transformative, learning through the immersion of the learner in the field experience. In 40 years, JGHE has helped Geography Fieldwork move from the margins of the curriculum to its current place at its core.
    • Film and superheroes as a pedagogic tool

      Bendall, Mark J.; University of Chester (IGI Global, 2018-08-17)
      The paper discusses the value of an interdisciplinary approach to analysing signs and the culture out of which they grow. It argues that films can be used in college and university settings to both deepen language appreciation and, especially, the cultural context around the language. It surveys precedents for the use of comics and film in teaching more generally and language learning more specifically. The broader validity of films as a pedagogic tool is first discussed before analysis of superhero films as a gateway into decoding dominant hegemonic culture. Concepts such as polysemy, psycho and sociopolitics are used to illustrate how multi-modal inter-disciplinary strategies can promote visual literacy. Whilst aimed at college and university teaching, this has applicability to younger learners too.
    • Finding my voice: A qualitative exploration into the perceived impact of person-centred counsellor training upon counsellors who were adopted as a baby.

      Parkes, Charlotte Hannah; Mintz, Rita; University of Chester
      This small‐scale qualitative study explored how qualified person‐centred counsellors who were adopted as a baby perceived the impact of their person‐centred counselling training. The study focused on the adoptees’ experiences of adoption and how these influenced their experience of person‐centred counselling training. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis to gain insight into how the participants made sense of their lived experience. The findings supported the difficulties associated with adoption, which not only are present in existing literature and research but also placed an emphasis on the particular vulnerabilities associated with being adopted as a baby. The findings further highlighted the positive impact of person‐centred counselling training on the participants’ personal development, which included the following: increased self‐awareness, self‐acceptance, identity development and ‘having a voice’. The findings confer implications for clinical practice in understanding the experience of adoptees who were adopted as a baby and for trainers in the planning and provision of person‐centred training. The research also identifies the healing aspects of person‐centred counselling training, which facilitated the participants’ positive self‐development. In addition, unique opportunities for counsellors who were also adopted as a baby are suggested and the need for the Adoption Support Fund to be extended to allow an adoptee of any age to access therapeutic support is also identified. The links made between adoption and person‐centred training are an original area of research and are worthy of further exploration.
    • The Finding My Way UK Clinical Trial: Adaptation report and protocol for a replication randomised controlled efficacy trial of a web-based psychological programme to support cancer survivors

      Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J; Leslie, Monica; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Koczwara, Bogda; Watson, Eila K; Hall, Peter S; Ashley, Laura; Coulson, Neil S; Jackson, Richard; Millington, Sue; et al. (JMIR, 2021-07-12)
      Background: Cancer survivors frequently report a range of unmet psychological and supportive care needs; these often continue after treatment has finished, and are predictive of psychological distress and poor health-related quality of life. Online interventions demonstrate good efficacy in addressing these concerns and are more accessible than face to face interventions. Finding My Way is an online, psycho-educational and cognitive behaviour therapy intervention for cancer survivors developed in Australia. Previous trials have demonstrated Finding My Way to be acceptable, highly adhered to, and effective in reducing the impact of distress on quality of life, whilst leading to cost-savings through health-resource use reduction. Objectives: Our study will adapt the Australian Finding My Way website for a UK cancer care context, and then undertake a single-blinded, randomised controlled trial (RCT) of Finding My Way UK against a treatment-as-usual waitlist control. Methods: As much as possible, our trial design replicates the existing Australian RCT of Finding My Way. Following a comprehensive adaptation of the web-resource, we will recruit 294 participants (147 per study arm) from across clinical sites in North West England and North Wales. Participants will: (i) have been diagnosed with cancer of any type in the last six months, (ii) have received anti-cancer treatment with curative intent, (iii) be over 16 years of age, (iv) be proficient in English and (v) have access to the internet and an active email address. Participants will be identified and recruited through the NIHR Clinical Research Network. Measures of distress, quality of life, and health economic outcomes will be collected using a self-report online questionnaire at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment and both three- and six-month follow-up. Quantitative data will be analysed using intention-to-treat Mixed-Model Repeated Measures analysis. Embedded semi-structured qualitative interviews will probe engagement with, and experiences of using, Finding My Way UK and suggestions for future improvements. Results: Website adaptation work was completed in January 2021. A panel of cancer survivors and healthcare professionals provided feedback on the test version of Finding My Way UK. Feedback was positive overall, though minor updates were made to website navigation, inclusivity, terminology and the wording of the Improving Communication and Sexuality and Intimacy content. Recruitment for the clinical trial commenced in April 2021. We aim to report on findings from mid 2023. Conclusions: Replication studies are an important aspect of the scientific process, particularly in psychological and clinical trial literatures, and especially in different geographical settings. Prior to replicating the Finding My Way trial in the UK setting, some content updating was required. If Finding My Way UK now replicates Australian findings, we will have identified a novel and cost-effective method of psychosocial care delivery for UK cancer survivors.
    • Flood risk insurance, mitigation and commercial property valuation

      Lamond, Jessica; Bhattacharya-Mis, Namrata; Chan, Faith K. S.; Kreibich, Heidi; Montz, Burrell; Proverbs, David; Wilkinson, Sara; University of the West of England; University of Chester; University of Nottingham Ningbo China; GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences; East Carolina University; Birmingham City University; University of Technology Sydney (Emerald, 2019-04-02)
      To understand how Built Environment professionals approach the valuation of flood risk in commercial property markets and whether insurance promotes mitigation in different insurance and risk management regimes, draw common conclusions, and highlight opportunities to transfer learning. An illustrative case study approach involving literature search and 72 interviews with Built Environment professionals, across five countries in four continents. Common difficulties arise in availability, reliability and interpretation of risk information, and in evaluating the impact of mitigation. These factors, coupled with the heteregenous nature of commercial property, lack of transactional data, and remote investors, make valuation of risk particularly challenging in the sector. Insurance incentives for risk mitigation are somewhat effective where employed and could be further developed, however the influence of insurance is hampered by lack of insurance penetration and underinsurance. Further investigation of the means to improve uptake of insurance and to develop insurance incentives for mitigation is recommended. Flood risk is inconsistently reflected in commercial property values leading to lack of mitigation and vulnerability of investments to future flooding. Improvements are needed in: access to adequate risk information; professional skills in valuing risk; guidance on valuation of flood risk; and regulation to ensure adequate consideration of risk and mitigation options. The research addresses a global issue that threatens local, and regional economies through loss of utility, business profitability and commercial property value. It is unique in consulting professionals across international markets.
    • Flood risk to commercial property: Training and Education Needs of Built Environment Professionals

      Bhattacharya-Mis, Namrata; Lamond, Jessica; Chang, Faith; Kreibich, Heidi; Burrell, Montz; Wilkinson, Sara; Proverbs, David (Emerald, 2018-10-08)
      Improved management of commercial property at risk from flooding may result from well-targeted advice from built environment professionals, such as surveyors, valuers and project managers. However, research indicates that the role of these professionals in providing such advice is currently limited for a variety of reasons. This research aimed to investigate the (perceived and real) barriers and opportunities for providing such advice in a number of international locations. In particular the research sought greater understanding of the link between regulation and guidance; perceived roles and capacity; and training and education needs. In order to cover different international settings an illustrative case study approach was adopted within the selected countries (Australia, UK, US, China and Germany). This involved a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews of built environment (BE) professionals with experience of advising on commercial properties at risk of flooding. Due to the specific nature of these interviews, a purposive sampling approach was implemented, leading to a sample of 72 interviews across the five international locations. Perceived barriers were linked to regulatory issues, a shortage of suitably experienced professionals, a lack of formal guidance and insurance requirements. BE professionals defined their roles differently in each case study in relation to these factors and stressed the need for closer collaboration among the various disciplines and indeed the other key stakeholders (i.e. insurers, loss adjusters, contractors). A shortage of knowledgeable experts caused by a lack of formal training and education was a common challenge highlighted in all locations. The research is unique in providing an international perspective on issues affecting built environment professionals in providing robust and impartial advice on commercial property at risk of flooding. Whilst acknowledging the existence of local flood conditions, regulatory frameworks and insurance regimes, the results indicate some recurring themes, indicating a lack of general flood risk education and training across all five case study countries. Learning across case studies coupled with appropriate policy development could contribute towards improved skills development and more consistent integration of BE professionals within future flood risk management practice, policy and strategy.
    • For a Zemiology of Politics

      Davis, Howard; White, Holly; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Sage Publications, 2022-09-09)
      A zemiology of politics is required in the face of disastrous historic, contemporary and future social harms. Focusing on state-led politics, the article charts some politically generated or mediated social harms: military; ecological and economic. These can generate justificatory narratives of zemiogenic deceit and ignorance. In a contemporary political moment of authoritarian populism, nativism and racism, each feature as part of wider processes towards the corruption and destruction of politics. The article then suggests some of the potentials of healthy politics and fundamental principles for a zemiology of politics including: subordination of crime-centric criminology to a historically grounded international zemiology, the incorporation of agnotological perspectives, and an orientation that is public, inclusive, reflexive and non-fundamentalist.
    • “For the love of the game”: The hidden mental health consequences of sport teams’ initiations

      Lafferty, Moira E.; Wakefield, Caroline; Ryan, David; University of Chester, Liverpool Hope (British Psychological Society, 2017)
      Abstract: Objectives: Initiations events, often referred to as welcome activities, are commonplace traditions in many sports teams. The short and long-term impact on the mental health of initiates, initiators and bystanders has been a focus of recent research attention. The present study aimed to explore the initiation experiences of UK student athletes and the subsequent effect on well-being. Design: Cross-sectional qualitative design using retrospective interviews. Methods: Sixteen sport team members were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted exploring participant experiences of welcome activities in their university sport teams. Results were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Six themes emerged from the data. These were: rite of passage; challenges; rules; reputation; persuasion and hierarchy. These themes were mapped onto the non-relational maltreatment conceptual framework that includes physical, social and emotional elements of bullying. In contrast to U.S. based studies, the results indicated that social bullying was the most prevalent, followed by emotional, and finally physical bullying. Conclusions: The study highlighted the occurrence of physical, social and emotional bullying during the initiation activities of sports’ teams. Furthermore, reference was made to the natural time progression in university sport that perpetuates the cycle of bullying and establishes the initiates as future initiators. For initiates who successfully negotiate the events, the effects of the bullying are minimised. However, for some this bullying can have serious mental health impacts both in the short and long term, whilst the challenges and risk behaviours may threaten the broader well-being of all involved.
    • Forget ‘Moral Panics’

      Horsley, Mark; Teeside University (David Polizzi, 2017-08-13)
      In the spirit of Jean Baudrillard’s Forget Foucault this article offers a step-by-step critique of the ‘moral panic’ concept. It begins with a short review of Cohen’s original thesis and its gradual evolution before addressing its remarkable popularity and its ascent to the stature of a domain assumption. The rest of the article uses and extends the existing critique of moral panic theory before arriving at the conclusion that, rather than undergo another period of adaptation, the entire conceptual repertoire of ‘moral panics’ should be ditched to make way for much-needed innovation.