• Ability of students to recognize the relationship between using mobile apps for learning during fieldwork and the development of graduate attributes

      France, Derek; Powell, Victoria; Mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; Rewhorn, Sonja; University of Chester; University of Reading; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2016-05-08)
      The increasing importance of employability in Higher Education curricula and the prevalence of using mobile devices for field-based learning, prompted an investigation into student awareness of the relationship between the use of mobile apps for learning and the development of graduate attributes (and the link to employability). The results from post-fieldwork focus groups from four field courses indicated that students could make clear links between the use of a variety of mobile apps and graduate attribute development. The study suggests a number of mobile apps can align simultaneously with more than one graduate attribute. Furthermore, prior experience and the context of use can influence students’ perceptions of an app and its link with different graduate attributes
    • Accompaniment through grief

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2015-02)
    • Activating and Guiding the Engagement of Seniors with online social networking: Experimental findings from the AGES 2.0 project

      Morton, Thomas; Wilson, Neil; Haslam, Catherine; Birney, Megan E.; Kingston, Rosemary; McCloskey, Lauren-Grace; University of Exeter; University of Queensland (SAGE, 2016-08-16)
      Objectives: Guided by theoretical and empirical work attesting to the health benefits of social connections, we tested whether internet connectivity, and training in its use for social purposes, can support the well-being of older adults receiving care. Methods: Participants (N = 76) were randomly assigned to receive 3 months training versus care-as-usual. Cognitive and mental health were assessed before and after the intervention. Results: Results show significant cognitive improvements across time in the training, but not control, group. This effect was mediated through a combination of increased social activity, improved self-competence, and maintained personal identity strength. Indirect effects on mental health outcomes via these processes were also observed. Discussion: These findings suggest that internet access and training can support the self and social connectedness of vulnerable older adults and to contribute positively to well-being.
    • Activity Monitoring for Ambient Assisted Living: the Smart Distress Monitor

      Pratesi, Alessandro; Sixsmith, Judith (CoralEurope, 2011)
    • Actuarialism

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2014-10-22)
      An analysis of actuarialism in the context of mental health and criminal justice
    • Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) after breast cancer: A qualitative study of factors associated with adherence

      Brett, Jo; Boulton, Mary; Fenlon, Deborah F.; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Walter, Fiona; Donnelly, Peter; Lavery, Bernadette; Morgan, Adrienne; Morris, Carolyn; Watson, Eila; Oxford Brookes University; Swansea University; University of Chester; Cambridge University; South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust; Oxford University Hospitals Foundation NHS Trust; Independent Cancer Patients' Voice (Dove Medical Press, 2018-02-16)
      Introduction : Despite evidence of the efficacy of Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy (AET) in reducing the risk of recurrence and mortality after treatment for primary breast cancer, adherence to AET is suboptimal. This study aimed to explore factors that influence adherence and non-adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) following breast cancer to inform the development of supportive interventions. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 32 women who had been prescribed AET, 2-4 years following their diagnosis of breast cancer,. Both adherers (n=19) and non-adherers (n=13) were recruited. The analysis was conducted using the Framework approach. Results: Factors associated with adherence were: Managing side effects including information and advice on side effects, and taking control of side effects, Supportive relationships, and Personal influences. Factors associated with non-adherence were: Burden of side effects, Feeling unsupported, Concerns about long term AET use, Re-gaining normality, including valuing quality of life over length of life, and Risk perception Conclusions: Provision of timely information to prepare women for the potential side effects of AET and education on medication management strategies are needed, including provision of timely and accurate information on the efficacy of AET in reducing breast cancer recurrence, and on potential side effects and ways to manage these should they arise. . Trust in the doctor-patient relationship and clear patient pathways for bothersome side effects and concerns with AET are important. Training and education around AET for GPs should be considered alongside novel care pathways such as primary care nurse cancer care review, and community pharmacist follow-up.
    • Advanced Qualitative Research: A Guide to Using Theory

      O’Reilly, Michelle; Kiyimba, Nikki; University of Chester; Leicester University (Sage, 2015-05-29)
      This distinctive, nuanced book addresses the more complex theoretical issues embedded in the qualitative research paradigm. Adopting a reflective stance that emphasises the role of the researcher it carefully avoids a standardised ‘tick box’ approach to methods. Throughout each chapter, theory is powerfully and persuasively interwoven as its impact on practical topics such as data management and safety in the field is discussed. O'Reilly and Kiyimba bring an authority and clarity to the debate, taking us beyond the mechanical notions of qualitative methods and standardised approaches to research. Instead, they focus on subjects like methodological integrity, perspective driven data collection and theoretically-led analysis. This will be an important resource for anyone looking to practically engage with advanced qualitative research methods.
    • ADVISING ON FLOOD RISK – OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES ACROSS INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MARKETS

      Bhattacharya Mis, Namrata; Chan,Faith; Kreibich,Heidi; Montz, Burrell; Lamond, Jessica; Proverbs, David; Wilkinson, Sara; University of Chester, Nottingham university, GHZ Berlin, University of East Carolina, University of West of England, Birmingham City University, UTS Sydney (Royal institution of Chartered Surveyors , London, 2018-04-23)
      There is an increasing body of research which identifies the need for flood risk mitigation advice and the potential for building professionals such as surveyors to be involved. This research explored the potential for surveyors to play a greater role in advising on at-risk commercial properties to better manage risk within the commercial property sector. Through a series of 72 expert interviews of professionals in the field of flood risk management in five international markets (UK, US, Australia, China and Germany), the research developed a picture of the current and potential role surveyors can play in providing professional advice on flood risk affected commercial properties. The interviews revealed that a wide set of opportunity lies in expert surveyors’ technical and local knowledge and understanding of risk mitigation and damage reduction processes, building typology, commercial land use, property valuation, and insurance schemes. However, their ability to offer flood specific advice is constrained by lack of: flood related expertise and training, market demand, client awareness of flood risk and, an willingness to invest in advice and mitigation measures on behalf of clients. The research highlights the need for collaborative practice to enable well informed all round advice on flood risk resilience. The findings also highlight the need for additional flood risk education and training for surveyors to assist them to provide improved risk mitigation advice.
    • Affective theory of mind inferences contextually influence the recognition of emotional facial expressions

      Stewart, Suzanne; Schepman, Astrid; Haigh, Matthew; McHugh, Rhian; Stewart, Andrew; University of Chester; Northumbria University; University of Manchester (Taylor & Francis, 2018-03-14)
      The recognition of emotional facial expressions is often subject to contextual influence, particularly when the face and the context convey similar emotions. We investigated whether spontaneous, incidental affective theory of mind inferences made while reading vignettes describing social situations would produce context effects on the identification of same-valenced emotions (Experiment 1) as well as differently-valenced emotions (Experiment 2) conveyed by subsequently presented faces. Crucially, we found an effect of context on reaction times in both experiments while, in line with previous work, we found evidence for a context effect on accuracy only in Experiment 1. This demonstrates that affective theory of mind inferences made at the pragmatic level of a text can automatically, contextually influence the perceptual processing of emotional facial expressions in a separate task even when those emotions are of a distinctive valence. Thus, our novel findings suggest that language acts as a contextual influence to the recognition of emotional facial expressions for both same and different valences.
    • Ageing and China: Towards theory, policy and practice

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (2015)
      In the 21st Century, economists and social analysts around the globe are increasingly concerned about the rising numbers of older people in their society. There are genuine concerns about the inadequacy of pension funds, of growing pressures on welfare systems, and on the inability of shrinking numbers of younger people to carry the burden of their elders. This article focuses on such gerontological issues in China, where the older people have become a rapidly expanding proportion of the population. While resources do need to be targeted on the vulnerable older people, the presumption that older people as a whole are an economic and social burden must be questioned. This is an ageist view that needs to be combated by locating how bio-medical views on aging seep into policy spaces in China that position negative perceptions of aging as both individual and populational problems. The article then moves to observe the implications of bio-medicine for older people in China in terms of "vulnerable" aging but deconstruct such "fixed" explanations by juxtaposing active aging as key narrative that epitomizes "declining to decline" as espoused by bio-medical sciences.
    • Ageing in post-industrial society: Trends and trajectories

      Powell, Jason; Khan, Hafiz; University of Chester ; Middlesex University (Uchitel Publishing House, 2014-11)
      This article examines a global question on the power of population ageing in the twenty-first century, particularly the degree to which population ageing is gradually becoming a real challenge to many geographical regions of the world.
    • Ageing, risk and EU

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (SciPress Ltd, 2014-05-04)
    • Ageing, technologies of self and bio‐medicine: a Foucauldian excursion

      Powell, Jason; Biggs, Simon; University of Chester; Melbourne University (Emerald, 2004-06-15)
      This paper unravels the conceptual and theoretical insights of Foucault’s later work on technologies of self in order to understand Bio‐medicine which impinges on the social construction of ageing. The article attempts to show how Foucault’s theoretical insights allows scholars of sociology and social policy to provide a critical appraisal of ageing. The paper also examines the relationship between ageing and self‐care in three contextual domains: good health management; use of counselling; and bodily enhancement.
    • Ageing, veterans and offending: New challenges for critical social work

      Taylor, Paul; Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-01-30)
      The relationship between ageing and the study of veterans of military service who have offended is uncharted territory. What is available to us are accounts operating in disparate areas of ageing and offending and veterans and offending. This has rich implications for ‘critical social work’ to add weight of research and theory to the significance of ageing identities of veterans for professional social work. This has challenges for the knowledge base for a critical social work given the significance of veterans’ identities and experiences.
    • Agenda setting with children using the ‘three wishes’ technique

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O'Reilly, Michelle; Lester, Jessica N.; University of Chester (Sage, 2018-03-15)
      The National Health Service (NHS; UK) offers initial screening appointments for children referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to determine clinical need and assess risk. Conversation analysis was utilised on 28 video-recordings of these assessments, lasting approximately 90 minutes each with a multidisciplinary team. This paper focuses on the agenda setting strategies used to establish relevant goals with children and adolescents; specifically, the technique of offering ‘three wishes’. For example, “if you had three wishes, what would you like to make happen?” In cases where children initially volunteered an assessment-relevant wish, they tended not to articulate further wishes. Non-assessment-relevant wishes (i.e. fantasy wishes, such as being “rich”) were treated as insufficient, with many approaches used to realign establishing assessment relevant goals. Where responses were not institutionally relevant, practitioners undertook considerable discursive work to realign the focus of the three wishes task to assessment relevance. In these cases, the wish responses were treated as irrelevant and tended to be dismissed, rather than explored for further detail. Such work with the children’s contributions has implications for engaging children and child-centred practices.
    • Aggression and conflict management at fusion in spider monkeys

      Aureli, Filippo; Schaffner, Colleen; Liverpool John Moores University ; University of Chester (The Royal Society, 2007-04)
      This article discusses fission–fusion dynamics amongst wild spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and how it is mitigated by the use of embraces.
    • Aging and Globalization: A Global Analysis

      Powell, Jason; Khan, Hafiz; University of Chester; Middlesex University (Uchitel Publishing House, 2014-05-10)
      This paper explores the implications of global aging in a global world.
    • Aging and Identity: A Dialogue with Postmodernism

      Powell, Jason; Gilbert, Tony; University of Liverpool; University of Plymouth (Nova Science Publishers, 2009-11-21)
      Viewing aging and identity through the critical lens of both contemporary gerontology theory and postmodernist concepts, the contributing scholars examine a vast range of issues: from disability to clothing; from aging, health and education to social philosophies and meanings of aging; and from auto-ethnographic methodologies to rethinking postmodern theories of aging. These rich examples demonstrate that traditional biomedical models of aging can no longer give universal and totalising views of aging. The key issue of the book is to point to the varied social and cultural representations and experiences of aging and identity formation. The book celebrates the diversity of older people, challenging the bio-medical equation of 'aging as decline' with exciting and alternative theorizations from postmodern gerontology. Further, a postmodern approach helps to debunk and shatter fixed and limited perceptions of aging by advocating an alternative expression of aging; the conceptual and theoretical focus on aging identity illuminates the self is fluid, changeable and dynamic. This book engages social theory with aging identity by analysing the challenges and opportunities afforded to older people in the ‘contemporary age of aging’.
    • The Aging Body

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2013-08-31)
      An examination of biomedical, psychological and social explanation of the human aging body.
    • Aging in Asia

      Powell, Jason; Cook, Ian; University of Chester; Liverpool John Moores University (Nova Science Publishers, 2009-09-28)
      This book focuses on the implications of population aging in Asia. The book discusses the differences in the magnitude of the aged population in different parts of Asia and highlights the perennial concerns of care and support facing older people and their families as Asian societies grapple with the aging population. The array of chapters in this book substantiates these challenges and opportunities afforded to different countries in Asia in light of demographic shifts, which range from an examination of broad issues of support for the aged and policy directions in East and Southeast Asia, to specific concerns relating to older people in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Pakistan, Korea, Bangladesh and Nepal. Population aging across these countries are experiencing increased longevity and a declining birth rate, which is becoming more prevalent. The book explains how, due to changes in population structure, aging will alter trends in the decades ahead in Asia. This book is unique in that the research cited is not only rich on aging experiences across Asia but is an important process in bringing together evocative, engaged and comparative insights as to how we understand complex aging and welfare issues.