• Counselling and psychotherapy; Hierarchies, epistemicide and bad medicine

      Egeli, Cemil (British Psychological Association, 2019-06)
      This article is a critique of the Scope of Practice and Education for the counselling and psychotherapy professions (SCoPEd) project which seeks to differentiate counselling and psychotherapy within a competence framework. It argues that SCoPEd is representative of a wider hegemonic, neoliberal and dehumanising agenda which is putting counselling at risk.
    • Policing the Neoliberal Crisis’: An Introduction to my PhD Research

      White, Holly; Edge Hill University (European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control, 2014-07)
      In ‘Policing the Neoliberal Crisis’ Holly White utilises the theoretical insights of Stuart Hall to explore how neoliberal elites have seized upon the current economic crisis to legitimise an increasingly punitive welfare system and a broader ideological narrative of a ‘ war against the poor’. Drawing upon her experience as a volunteer for the Citizens Advice Bureau, Holly White makes explicit connections between changes in the macro political economy and micro policy developments in the UK concerning homelessness and the ‘Bedroom tax’. As her conclusion indicates, her work is interventionist, focusing upon the current operationalization of neoliberal hegemony and how alternative critical imaginaries and social movements are being either nurtured or suppressed.
    • Westminster’s Narration of the Neoliberal Crisis: Rationalising the Irrational?

      White, Holly; Edge Hill University (EG Press, 2017-07-23)
      This chapter introduces my doctoral research, which contributes an analysis of Westminster definers’ narration of the 2007 onwards-neoliberal capitalist crisis to the British public concerned with their strategies for maintaining hegemony. Firstly, it explains that neoliberals seized the opportunity presented by the neoliberal crisis to extend the project’s reach and deepen its roots and operated to ensure it did not become a crisis of neoliberalism. Second it argues that Westminster definers constructed a narrative that attempted to rationalise a response that truth, empirical evidence followed by sound reasoning, deems irrational but which serves the interests of private capital. Thirdly, the chapter presents an overview of the research design.