• Editorial Introduction: Rethinking Illness, Crisis and Loss

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sage, 2014-09-01)
      This timely issue of Illness, Crisis and Loss brings us a wealth of inspirational approaches on understanding spirituality, culture and grief, end-of-life care, nursing education, and implications of coping models. The articles in this issue address key issues in understanding individual experiences of loss, grief, and coping models. As bereaved people, we need our experiential grief to be recognized, to be acknowledged. We require an understanding of the meaning of the relationship that has been lost—and this is often what is least understood by others. The impact of a loss is determined, not so much by the name given to the relationships, but by the meaning of that relationship in the bereaved individual’s life. Someone significant in our life is missing, and we realize that the cost of our love is the pain of our grief.
    • Editorial: Introduction

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sage, 2014-04-01)
      This issue of the Journal brings together a number of comparative articles on illness, crisis, and loss. This issue illuminates that illness, crisis, and loss are central forces shaping personal biographies and social life across comparative cultures. These international articles draw on qualitative methodologies to tap an understanding of illness and in combination provide a broad yet holistic perspective on the interrelationships of illness, crisis and loss. Each of the articles illustrates how they contribute to social change and how the cultural meanings of illness, crisis and loss are created to make sense of personal experiences in contemporary society. These are important existential issues but also significant additions to debates and discussions on illness, crisis, and loss for practitioners, user groups, and researchers. Engaging with different cultural contexts is essential to see how illness, crisis, and loss is experienced, managed, and researched.
    • An examination of the developmental impact of continuing destructive parental conflict on young adult children.

      Fozard, Emily; Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (SAGE Publications, 2017-05-11)
      This research investigates the impact of destructive parental conflict in continuously married parents, on young adult children. Four trainee or practicing counselors, who had personal experience of growing up in families in which there was continuing destructive parental conflict, were interviewed. The data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The findings resulted in four superordinate themes: feelings of loss, impact to family structure, trauma associated with the conflict, and impacts to personal and professional development, within which were 12 subordinate themes. Short-term impacts focused on mental health and self-esteem, and loss of security at home. Long-term impacts focused on future relationships, defensiveness, parent–child role-reversal, impacts to career, trauma, and parent–child relationships. The results demonstrate the necessity for support to be made available to children who are exposed to destructive parental conflict in parents who remain married, as well as to the adult children of continuing destructive parental conflict.
    • An exploration of the ways in which feelings of ‘maternal ambivalence’ affect some women

      Gubi, Peter M.; Chapman, Emma; University of Chester; Private Practice (Sage, 2019-08-18)
      This study explores the ways in which feelings of “maternal ambivalence” affect women. Through semistructured interviews, four women spoke about their experiences that led to ambivalent feelings about their motherhood. The data gathered from these interviews were analyzed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. This research found that these women experienced a loss of independence, relationships, and confidence when they became mothers. Together, these losses felt like a loss of “self” which led to many unexpected and unwanted feelings. They were shocked and confused when they experienced feelings of resentment towards themselves, others, and their children. They also experienced unexpected feelings of boredom and anxiety in relation to mothering. However, with time and perspective, these women experienced a reemergence of “self” through their ability to begin to balance parts of “self” and accept their ambivalent feelings towards motherhood.
    • Factors that may continue to impact a mother’s emotional wellbeing once her child’s treatment for cancer has completed and their implications for ongoing support

      Hill, Lynda; Gubi, Peter Madsen; University of Chester; The Joshua Tree Foundation
      This research explores factors that may continue to impact a mother’s emotional wellbeing once her child’s treatment for cancer has completed. Research indicates that, contrary to a general expectation of experiencing joy as treatment ends, some families experience very mixed emotions, with fear playing a large part, both leading up to treatment completion and, for some, continuing post-treatment. However, there is no literature that explores a mother’s emotional wellbeing after a number of years’ post-treatment. This research is a contribution towards addressing that deficit. Five mothers were interviewed using semi-structured questions to gather data relating to their specific lived experiences. These were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Results indicate that although end of treatment was longed for, there continues to be much uncertainty and fear post-treatment, and this can continue years after treatment has ended. Mothers described changes within themselves (e.g. new attitudes to living) and a need to adapt to a ‘new normal’. There were elements of grief for the loss of family life with which they were once so familiar. There was also a strong sense of wanting to support others, so that their own experiences weren’t wasted. All participants recognised that further counselling support for themselves would be beneficial.
    • Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse Against Men: Voices of Victimization Among Ex-Servicemen of the British Armed Forces

      Taylor, Paul J.; Keeling, June J.; Mottershead, Richard; University of Chester; Keele University; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-07-07)
      This study presents the personal testimonies of male British ex-Armed Forces personnel who have experienced violence and abuse victimization that was perpetrated by civilian female partners. In this research, we argue that to embark upon any understanding of the domestic lives of military personnel, an appreciation of the linkages to the cultural context of the military institution is necessary. Understanding the influence of the military institution beyond the military domain is crucial. We unveil the nature and character of the violence and abuse and how the servicemen negotiated their relationships. In doing so, we highlight the embodiment of military discipline, skills, and tactics in the home—not ones of violence which may be routinely linked to military masculinities; rather ones of restraint, tolerance, stoicism, and the reduction of a threat to inconsequential individual significance.
    • Introduction to Illness, Crisis and Loss

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sage, 2015-04-01)
      This collection of papers highlights some of the key cultural and social interpretations of illness, crisis, and loss across different personal and institutional spaces—the ways that values, beliefs, behavior, emotions, and institutional arrangements concerning chronic illness, bereavement, and professional practice are structured by social environments and contexts. Although illness and death are universal human experiences, societal responses vary according to cultural attitudes, as well as contextual factors including the primary causes of illness and death, and normative age at which illness and death occurs. In this issue of the journal, researchers, social scientists, policy makers, practitioners, and students will be learning about topics of direct relevance to understanding the world in which we live.
    • ‘Soldiering by consent’ and military-civil relations: Military transition into the public space of policing

      Murray, Emma; Taylor, Paul; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester (SAGE Publications, 2019-03-18)
      Growth in the Armed Forces undertaking public policing is occurring in the United Kingdom and elsewhere and as such a complex security landscape emerges, both practically and conceptually. The aim here is to pose questions of the manifest and latent issues in the assemblage of multiple actors in public policing. It aks to reader to consider the implications of military actors transitioning from defence duties ordinarily associated with military work, to policing activities in public spaces. Taking the London 2012 Olympic Games as our point of reference, this article argues that to understand military presence, their role must be considered in the broader context of military and policing functions, the ‘war on terror’, accountability, and future priorities for public policing. We must be careful not to assign the presence of the military into pre-existing understandings of how mega-events should be secured – the military patrolling the streets of London represents more. Instead, as their presence comes to be legitimate in certain geopolitical contexts, critical questions must be asked especially as public and private arrangements are continually reworked in the domestic fight against terrorism.
    • Understanding Illness, Crisis and Loss

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sage, 2014-07-01)
      This issue of the Journal brings together a number of important articles on illness, crisis, and loss. This issue shines light on illness, crisis, and loss as central forces shaping our personal experiences, social life, and order. The articles all, in one way or another, draw on various disciplines relating to education, sociology, philosophy, and psychology to provide different perspectives on the interrelationships of illness, crisis, and loss, showing how they contribute to social change and how the meanings of illness, crisis, and loss are generated to serve social functions but used to make sense of personal narratives in contemporary society.
    • Voices of deficit: Mental health, criminal victimisation and epistemic injustice

      Carver, Liddy; Morley, Sharon; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-11-03)
      People who endure mental and emotional distress experience a plethora of negative experiences beyond the effects of the symptoms themselves. For centuries, the designation of labels of difference; that is, those which transgress approved social norms, have affected the lived experiences of those individuals, and more widely in structuring responses, engagements with, and attitudes between society and the individual. Understanding the creation of tainted identities, particularly of those with experience of mental and emotional distress have been well rehearsed in the sociological literature of the second half of the twentieth century. Central to much of this analysis has been to understand the nature of the manufacture of deviant identities, how they are sustained and the impact of these identities on those who experience them. This paper explores the experience of those with mental and emotional distress as a victim of crime. The interconnectedness of matters of identity created though the application of a diagnosis of illness/disorder is addressed as is the crisis of criminal victimisation. This is achieved via an exploration of contemporary concerns surrounding victims of crime with experience of mental and emotional distress, including the (further) loss of voice and agency when interfacing with agencies of the State.