• Actuarialism

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2014-10-22)
      An analysis of actuarialism in the context of mental health and criminal justice
    • Anti-Psychiatry Movement

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2014-10-22)
      This chapter documents the history of the anti-psychiatry movement. Within the domains of criminal justice and mental health care, critical debate concerning 'care' versus 'control' and 'therapy' versus 'security' is now commonplace. Indeed, the 'hybridisation' of these areas is now a familiar theme. This unique and topical text provides an array of expert analyses from key contributors in the field that explore the interface between criminal justice and mental health. Using concise yet robust definitions of key terms and concepts, it consolidates scholarly analysis of theory, policy and practice. Readers are provided with practical debates, in addition to the theoretical and ideological concerns surrounding the risk assessment, treatment, control and risk management in a cross-disciplinary context. Included in this book is recommended further reading and an index of legislation, making it an ideal resource for students at undergraduate and postgraduate level, together with researchers and practitioners in the field.
    • Antipsychiatry

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-03-01)
      A historical mapping of the development and influence of the antipsychiatry perspective
    • Cashing in on curiosity and spectacle: The forensic patient and news media

      Morley, Sharon; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-05-24)
      Health and social care professionals are gatekeepers to, and custodians of, confidential service user information. In the United Kingdom (UK), police investigations have unveiled cases of payments being made to public service officials by journalists in return for service user information. The purpose of this discussion is to investigate such cases in the context of high security forensic care. This paper provides a discussion drawing upon two UK-based case studies of prosecutions of public service workers relating to the sale of confidential information. The analysis presented here illuminates upon the salient and connected issues at work that have led to the transgression of legal obligations and professional responsibilities/principles of confidentiality. A fuller reading of the context in which these transgressions occur, and motivations that exist, may well serve to inform policy, training, guidance or vigilance in relation to the preserving of service user information in the future.
    • A Companion to Crime, Harm and Victimisation

      Corteen, Karen; Morley, Sharon; Taylor, Paul J.; Turner, Jo; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2016-06-29)
      This is the first accessible, succinct text to provide definitions and explanations of key terms and concepts relating to the expanding field of crime, harm and victimisation. Written by a wide range of experts, it includes theories, ideas and case studies relating to victims of conventional crime and victims outside the remit of criminal law. It encapsulates the domestic and international nature, extent and measurement of victims of crime and harm, together with responses to victims and victimisation as a result of conventional, corporate and state crimes and harms. As part of the Companion series, entries are presented in a user-friendly A-Z format with clear links to related entries and further reading, allowing easy navigation for both students and practitioners. Filling a gap in the market, this is a good source and quick reference point for undergraduates studying a variety of courses in criminology, criminal justice, victimology and other related disciplines.
    • A companion to criminal justice, mental health and risk

      Taylor, Paul J.; Corteen, Karen; Morely, Sharon; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2015-02-09)
      Within the domains of criminal justice and mental health care, critical debate concerning ‘care’ versus ‘control’ and ‘therapy’ versus ‘security’ is now commonplace. Indeed, the ‘hybridisation’ of these areas is now a familiar theme. This unique and topical text provides an array of expert analyses from key contributors in the field that explore the interface between criminal justice and mental health. Using concise yet robust definitions of key terms and concepts, it consolidates scholarly analysis of theory, policy and practice. Readers are provided with practical debates, in addition to the theoretical and ideological concerns surrounding the risk assessment, treatment, control and risk management in a cross-disciplinary context. Included in this book is recommended further reading and an index of legislation, making it an ideal resource for students at undergraduate and postgraduate level, together with researchers and practitioners in the field.
    • The Coroner’s inquest and visceral reactions: Considering the impact of self-inflicted deaths on the health and social care professional

      Corteen, Karen; Taylor, Paul J.; Morley, Sharon; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2014-09-30)
      This book chapter presents a discussion of the potential impact of participation in the Coroner’s Inquest for health and social care professionals.
    • Coup

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2017-02-15)
      .
    • Deinstitutionalization

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-02-12)
      An analysis of the process of deinstitutionalization (mental health systems) in the US and UK context.
    • Gender, Masculinity, Contemporary History and the Psychiatric Secure Estate: Back to the Future?

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (World Scientific News, 2015-10-10)
      In contemporary history, the use of gendered treatments for women with mental health issues in the psychiatric secure estate is an issue of major concern in Great Britain. This paper examines women and gender in the psychiatric secure estate from a structural analysis drawing influence from Connell‟s (1987) theoretical and conceptual work on hegemonic masculinity. Bio-psychological approaches have almost dominated academic discussion in relation to women‟s incarceration and there is an reflexive need to develop other sociological frameworks on hegemonic masculinity because dominant bio-psychological models have failed to identify underlying configurations which combine to oppress women whilst simultaneously reproducing consequences of masculinity and power within institutional structures.
    • The global south: The case of populational aging in Africa and Asia

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (World Scientific News, 2015-06)
      This paper explores the implications of social and economic changes in the Global South of the World. In particular, we examine case studies of Japan and China and the impact of populational aging on their economic policies and social practices. Key examples of uneven distributions of, or access to, opportunities have the potential to give rise to further social or economic tensions. Whilst the scholarly base is expanding, more is to be done to ascertain the characterization of inequalities. Indeed, if these substantive issues are to be addressed comprehensively, the key then is to move beyond a Western academic paradigm, and to purposefully involve critical scholarship from intellectuals from the Global South. Doing so will add a vitality of experience in discussing how economic growth is, or may not be coupled with, inequality.
    • Governing the body: The legal, administrative and discursive control of the psychiatric patient

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2013-03-01)
      This chapter documents the nature and character of controls over the 'psychiatric subject'
    • An incongruous duality?: Care, control & the social world of the mental health worker

      Ogden, Cassandra A.; Morley, Sharon; Mason, Tom; Smith, Catrin; Taylor, Paul J. (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2011-01)
      The contemporary mental health profession is facing a crisis of recruitment and retention. Services provided are complex, practically and conceptually. On one hand, assessments and treatments are provided, but on the other, staff become responsible for the administration of coercive security discourses and arrangements. This complex phenomenon can leave mental health personnel vulnerable to criticisms in exactly how best they should discharge their duties within an occupational remit of duality. Working in the correct or most appropriate way is a constant challenge for staff as they must meet with approval from both managers and colleagues negotiating a path between formal rules and informal norms. This exploratory study was undertaken within a mental health NHS Trust in the North of England. It interviewed twenty participants from a range of areas of work, namely hospital wards, occupational therapy departments and the community setting. A narrative interviewing technique has been used to collect occupational histories and stories which have been used in an attempt to illuminate the contemporary issues facing clinical staff. Findings suggest that their contemporary care delivery is much more complex than previously known and that there is a diverse range of background and conceptual challenges which workers face in addition to their organisationally prescribed practical mandates of work. Six normative orders of work have emerged from data that has been collected; bureaucracy, risk management, competence, morality, physical environment and care versus control. Participant reflections on professional autonomy and responsibility shed light on the perceived rationality of policies and procedures and 'governance at a distance' taking place in response to bureaucratic and risk reduction imperatives. Indeed, such work is demanding and the management of a professional 'performance', and the self regulating and adaption of emotion have been seen to be an important dimension in the observation of occupational competence and work-based socialisation processes. Furthermore, personnel are engaged in a complex and fluid role duality where they must personally reconcile their role as care provider whilst also maintaining levels of physical security in a contemporary and technologically advanced healthcare environment. In this thesis, it is argued that these normative aspects of work typify the social nature of mental health work and, in addition, take place under the auspices of Goffmanesque theorisations of the 'total institution', 'mortification of self and 'social contamination'. These findings draw particular attention to an under acknowledged aspect of mental health based inquiry where the formal and informal spheres of work are observed to co-mingle within the environment of psychiatry. In doing so, questions arise over the rationality of some systems of work which 'shop-floor' staff are engaged within, yet, at times, have very little opportunity to shape as individual practitioners.
    • Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse Against Men: Voices of Victimization Among Ex-Servicemen of the British Armed Forces

      Taylor, Paul J.; Keeling, June J.; Mottershead, Richard; University of Chester; Keele University; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-07-07)
      This study presents the personal testimonies of male British ex-Armed Forces personnel who have experienced violence and abuse victimization that was perpetrated by civilian female partners. In this research, we argue that to embark upon any understanding of the domestic lives of military personnel, an appreciation of the linkages to the cultural context of the military institution is necessary. Understanding the influence of the military institution beyond the military domain is crucial. We unveil the nature and character of the violence and abuse and how the servicemen negotiated their relationships. In doing so, we highlight the embodiment of military discipline, skills, and tactics in the home—not ones of violence which may be routinely linked to military masculinities; rather ones of restraint, tolerance, stoicism, and the reduction of a threat to inconsequential individual significance.
    • Medicalisation, harm and victimisation

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2016-06-29)
      This chapter documents the possible deleterious effects of medicalisation
    • Mental Distress

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2014-10-22)
      This chapter critically evaluates the concept of mental distress. Within the domains of criminal justice and mental health care, critical debate concerning 'care' versus 'control' and 'therapy' versus 'security' is now commonplace. Indeed, the 'hybridisation' of these areas is now a familiar theme. This unique and topical text provides an array of expert analyses from key contributors in the field that explore the interface between criminal justice and mental health. Using concise yet robust definitions of key terms and concepts, it consolidates scholarly analysis of theory, policy and practice. Readers are provided with practical debates, in addition to the theoretical and ideological concerns surrounding the risk assessment, treatment, control and risk management in a cross-disciplinary context. Included in this book is recommended further reading and an index of legislation, making it an ideal resource for students at undergraduate and postgraduate level, together with researchers and practitioners in the field.
    • Political Participation

      Louth, Jonathon; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Adelaide; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2014-10-22)
      This chapter critically debates the access to, or restriction to, political participation across jurisdictions for those incarcerated.
    • Private Security

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2017)
      A summary of the critical context of private security and the private security industry.
    • Rethinking Risk and Ageing: Extending Working Lives

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2016-07-04)
      This paper critically examines the development of recent policy and theoretical issues concerning the ‘extension of working lives’ for older people in the United Kingdom. It grounds its analysis in ideas from the ‘risk society’ thesis (Beck, 1992) to explore how the matrix of population ageing, job and pension changes impinge on shifting emphasis on increasing the retirement age coupled with individualizing pensions from State provision to a focus on self-responsibility via private provision. This neo-liberal re-positioning of extending work and pension policy has implications for the management of risk for older people in the UK. The paper explores the impact of population ageing on Government ideas associated with social policy relating to extending working lives. It concludes with an assessment on the lessons policy makers and social policy analysts can learn from such shifts and impact on the social construction of age.
    • Self-harm and suicide

      Reeves, Andrew; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Sage Publications, 2017-06-02)
      This chapter considers contemporary perspectives of self-harm and suicide and how they are often contextualized within a medicalised construct. It challenges this position and instead offers an alternative perspective, together with good practice parameters.