• Barth and Hans W. Frei

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester
      In this chapter, I will summarise the development of Hans Frei’s reading of Karl Barth in order to contextualise his own Christology as an attempt to learn from Barth yet think beyond him on the locus central to all his theology. While we can trace significant lines of continuity between Frei’s Identity of Jesus Christ and Karl Barth as Frei understood him, we can also see it as a bold, risky essay in pursuit of an even more focused attention to the concreteness of God’s presence in Jesus Christ given us in the text of Scripture.
    • Barth, Origen, and universal salvation: Restoring particularity

      Greggs, Tom (Oxford University Press, 2009-05-14)
      This book proposes a bold new presentation of universal salvation. The author discusses the third-century theologian, Origen, and the twentieth-century Swiss theologian, Karl Barth, to offer a defence of universalism as rooted in Christian theology, showing this belief does not have to be at the expense of human particularity, freedom, and Christian faith.
    • Bringing Barth’s critique of religion to the inter‐faith table

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (University of Chicago Press, 2008-01)
      Although he criticized Barth under the enigmatic phrase “positivism of revelation,” Bonhoeffer saw Barth’s criticism of religion as “his really great merit.” In the present age in which inter-faith dialogue has become more pressing than it has perhaps ever before been, theology can at times engage in two conversations that are not only separate but at worst self‐contradictory: in its discussions with secular society, theology can engage in critical discussions about religion, drinking deeply from the well of criticism offered by the likes of Feuerbach, Nietzsche, Durkheim, and Marx; yet, in its discussions in inter‐faith settings, the danger can arise that these critiques are thrown out altogether or at least lie in abeyance.
    • Claiming Barth for ethics: The last two decades

      Clough, David; Leyden, Michael; University of Chester (Brill, 2010-01-01)
      This article discusses various studies of Karl Barth's ethics written since 1990.
    • Eros and agape in Karl Barth’s Church dogmatics

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Blackwell, 2006-10-10)
      This article discusses the concepts of eros and agape in Karl Barth's Church dogmatics.
    • Ethics in crisis: Interpreting Barth's ethics

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2005-08-26)
      This work depicts the contemporary crisis in Christian ethical thought and offers a constructive proposal for responding to this crisis. The constructive proposal draws on a new and persuasive interpretation of the ethics of Karl Barth developed in the central section of the book. The aims of the work are three-fold: (1) to draw attention to the failure of Christian ethicists to speak in a way that can be heard in contemporary ethical debate; (2) to demonstrate that Karl Barth’s ethical thought should be interpreted dialectically, in the light of his response to the crisis of the Römerbrief; (3) to make a proposal for how the crisis of speechlessness in contemporary Christian ethics may be overcome, drawing on this dialectical interpretation of Barth’s ethics.
    • Ever-widening circles: Karl Barth and inter-faith dialogue

      Greggs, Tom; University of Cambridge (2007)
    • Fighting at the command of God: Reassessing the borderline case in Karl Barth’s account of war in the Church dogmatics

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2004-12-21)
      This book chapter discusses Karl Barth's attitudes to warfare and pacifism.
    • ‘Jesus is victor’: Passing the impasse of Barth on universalism

      Greggs, Tom; University of Cambridge (Cambridge University Press, 2007-04-20)
      This article examines the question of Karl Barth's stance on universalism.
    • Karl Barth on religious and irreligious idolatry

      Clough, David; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2007-05-31)
    • The Lord of all: Rediscovering the Christian doctrine of providence for the world

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2011-06-23)
      This book chapter discusses the Christian doctrine of providence and suggests that a deeper understanding of this will lead to a greater appreciation of the universality of God's grace. This is discussed within the context of the work of Karl Barth.
    • Responsible Before God: Human Responsibility in Karl Barth’s Moral Theology

      Clough, David; Fulford, Ben; Leyden, Michael (University of Chester, 2014-04)
      This thesis contributes to the recent scholarly re-evaluation of Karl Barth’s moral theology through an examination of the theme of human responsibility in his thought. The language of responsibility recurs throughout Barth’s ethical writings, and its frequency and strategic significance in his articulation of the nature of the active human agent in Christian ethics means it is worthy of scholarly consideration. To date, no extended study of this topic in Barth’s thought exists, and, apart from critical summaries of his use of responsibility language in select parts of the Church Dogmatics in corners of the secondary literature, responsibility-ethicists have tended to ignore Barth’s work on this topic. My intention, through exegetical reading of several key texts, is to provide explication, clarification, and analysis of his understanding of human responsibility. On the basis of this exegetical work I shall argue that the idea of responsibility is in fact a key component of Barth’s theological ethics and significantly informs his presentation of human agency. Following the introductory chapter, the central chapters of the thesis are exegetical readings of human responsibility in three major texts from the Barth corpus: the Ethics lectures; the ethics of CD II/2; and the special ethics of CD III/4. The fifth and final chapter is a synopsis of the development of Barth’s understanding and his articulation of human responsibility across these texts. My constructive proposal as to how we may understand Barth’s overall account is based on the preceding exegetical work. I argue that the ethics of the Church Dogmatics ought to be read together, and that in doing so we see that the mature Barth offers: 1) a theological description of human responsibility, which I argue is a kind of moral ontology in which the human agent is called to inhabit a particular space in relation to God; and 2) concrete indications of the kind of responsible actions that represent and enable the embedding of that description in human life. He develops what I term “indicative practices” which give shape to human lives, enabling human agents to navigate the moral space into which they have been placed. These two elements taken together are, I suggest, the sum of Barth’s account of human responsibility.