• Prayer with pain: Ceremonial suffering among the Mi'kmaq

      Owen, Suzanne; University of Chester/Leeds Trinity University (State University of New York Press, 2013-10-01)
      There are many ways to pray amongst Native American and First Nations, but considered the most ‘powerful’ are those that involve an element of physical suffering that can be regarded as gifts to ‘spirit’ and understood in the context that when something is asked for – visions, healing, etc. – then something must be given in exchange in order to restore the balance and promote respectful relationships. Prayer with pain in a ceremonial context, linking the individual to community, transforms personal suffering into empowerment gained through a shared healing experience.
    • Translating Patịcca-samuppāda in Early Buddhism

      Jones, Dhivan Thomas; University of Chester
      This chapter addresses the issue of how to translate the term paṭicca-samuppāda, which relies on the use of Prakrit and Sanskrit grammatical forms for which there are no exact English equivalents, and which expresses a core Buddhist concept for which there is no exact philosophical equivalent outside of Buddhist teachings.