• Antiquity at the National Memorial Arboretum

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-01-16)
      The paper explores the use of ancient and historic material cultures and architectures within the recent resurgence in public commemoration in the UK. Using the case study of the National Memorial Arboretum (Staffordshire), the study focuses on how ancient designs (including prehistoric, classical and medieval styles and forms) interleave with the arboreal, geological and celestial themes of the memorial gardens. Together these designs serve to create a multitude of temporal poises by which auras of commemorative perpetuity and regeneration are projected and sustained. The paper proposes that archaeologists can bring their expertise to bear on the investigation of the complex, varied allusions to the past within contemporary landscapes of memory.
    • Being, making and imagining: Toward a practical theology of technology

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Manchester (Routledge, 2009-07-29)
      This article discusses how theological reflections upon the relationship between 'earth, sky, gods, and morals' - or nature, transcendence, divinity and humanity - might enable new framings of what it means to be human in the context of advanced technological societies.
    • Cremation and contemporary churchyards

      Williams, Howard; Williams, Elizabeth; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-07-05)
      A contemporary archaeological investigation of cremation memorials in English and Welsh churchyards.
    • Decoding Desire: From Kirk and Spock to K/S

      Woledge, Elizabeth; University of Chester (Routledge, 2005-08)
      This paper uses the example of 'slash fiction' (fan fiction which appropriates media heroes to form homoerotic pairings) to offer an investigation which broadens the concept of decoding. Slash fiction provides a particularly suitable starting point for considering the decoding process, as it is one of the few cases in which we have the evidence of decoding readily available for analysis in the form of fanzines. Many academics have considered Kirk and Spock's relationship as it was represented in Star Trek and the homoerotic 'K/S' fiction which it inspired, however no one has effectively considered the interpretive processes which connect them. The author questions the implicit belief that K/S fiction is an 'oppositional' decoding of Star Trek and demonstrate its more negotiated nature through a detailed consideration of the decoding process. To this end the author borrows an idea of David Morley's who has suggested that 'Hall's original model [of decoding] tends to blur together questions of recognition, comprehension, interpretation and response' (Morley 1994, 21). This paper will take up Morley's four process model of decoding and answer Jenkins' call for a closer analysis of the links between audience reception and texts (Jenkins 1996, 275).
    • Devotion and affliction in the time of cholera: ritual healing, identity and resistance among Bengali Muslims

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-12-05)
      The chapter examines the worship of the cholera goddess Olā Bibi among Muslims of Bengal. Moving from an analysis of iconographic, mythical and ritual material, I investigate how Bengali Muslims have responded to the threat of cholera from early eighteenth century. The goddess has served as a catalyst to inform local identity and to challenge external agency in matter of disorder and social control. Yet while Bengali culture has facilitated a convergence of visions and programs in time of crisis (cholera epidemics and colonialism), the recent affirmation of militant Islamism has aggressively confronted indigenous healing practices thus causing major internal collisions in matter of community ethos, and a consequential loss of vernacular knowledge.
    • Feeding and forming the People of God: the Lord, his Supper and the Church in Calvin and 1 Corinthians 11:17-34

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Routledge, 2009-11-23)
      In this chapter I seek to identify the specific value of the Lord's Supper in distinction from hearing the Word, by reading Calvin’s commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:17-34, and by seeking to supplement his account through fresh theological engagement with the biblical text. Reading Scripture leads Calvin to identify the Supper, in answer to Cocksworth’s question, as an intensified moment of covenant with God in soul-nourishing union with Christ and one another, intensified because of the instrumental role of physical signs. Yet he pays relatively little attention to the importance of the life of the visible church community in the meaning of the Supper in Paul’s argument. By exploring this ecclesial dimension further, I argue, we see the practical, ethical and missional implications of the Supper’s meaning for the church.
    • Ford as Poet

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-12-03)
      A 7,000-work study of Ford's poetry, existing scholarship, and suggested new directions.
    • Geographical Information Systems as a Tool for Exploring the Spatial Humanities

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Gregory, Ian; University of Chester; Lancaster University (Routledge, 2016-07-28)
      This chapter will introduce the basics of geographical information systems (GIS) for humanities scholarship. It will provide a brief overview of how using GIS software can help researchers understand the geographies within their sources. It will briefly introduce how GIS models features and places on the Earth’s surface so that the reader is gets a basic understanding of the core terminology associated with GIS. It will then talk through the basics of how a researcher gets their sources into GIS software; how they can query, integrate and analyse data within GIS; and how they can disseminate their results using maps and electronic outputs such as KML files that can be disseminated using Google Earth. The conclusion will look briefly at what a researcher can and cannot expect to gain from using GIS and stress that mapping is only a part of the research process – good at identifying and describing patterns but limited in its ability to explain them. The chapter will be include several diagrams and will be extensively referenced.
    • 'Hands across the tea': Renegotiating Jewish Identity and Belonging in Post-war Britain

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-08-07)
      In contemporary Britain, Jewish identity – what it means to be ‘Jewish’, how it is to be enacted and performed, and indeed the parameters and environments of Jewish life itself – have become more elastic. This chapter suggests that these changes can, in part, be understood as a consequence of Jewish suburbanisation across the twentieth century. As strangers became neighbours, the intimacies facilitated by spatial proximity and a shared investment in ‘place’ altered notions of ‘Jewishness’ and ‘Britishness’ in turn. However, as an examination of the period 1945-1966 suggests, the inter-play between and melding of minority and majority identity was rarely straight-forward.
    • Interrogating the Post-Secular

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-11-21)
      This chapter seeks to engage in some detail with the conceptual underpinning of the post-secular. It seeks both to clarify, and defend, the relevance and value of what remains, for some, a relatively controversial conceptual term. However the idea of the postsecular is con-ceived —“post” as either against, beyond, or after; “secular” as denoting institutional decline, loss of personal belief or the effacement of the sacred—I will argue that it still has consider-able potential. It can illuminate the changing tensions between newly-visible religious actors with¬in local and global civil society and those who contest such incursions into the supposed neutrality of the public square. Above all, the unprecedented nature of the post¬secular serves to signal the contradictions inherent in the renewed presence of faith, especially in public life, alongside continuing opposition to religion as a source of legitimate public discourse. Such a juxtaposition of belief and non-belief within postsecularity infuses all our consciousness, even the most religiously devout. It follows that any attempt to speak of faith in public re¬quires a greater sophistication and sensitivity than ever.
    • Introduction: Rethinking Literary Mapping

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Donaldson, Christopher; Cooper, David; University of Chester; Lancaster University; Manchester Metropolitan University (Routledge, 2016-05-20)
      This book is about the relationship between the practice of mapping, the application of geospatial technologies and the interpretation of literary texts. The contributors have been selected from a range of disciplines and they approach this relationship from different perspectives. Yet, notwithstanding these differences, their contributions are collectively defined by a shared preoccupation with the possibilities afforded – and the problems presented – by the use of digital mapping tools and techniques in literary studies and cultural-geographical research. Each of the following chapters, that is to say, explores the dynamic ways that the creation of literary maps can confirm meaning and challenge critical assumptions.
    • Invitation to Research in Practical Theology

      Bennett, Zoe; Graham, Elaine L.; Pattison, Stephen; Walton, Heather; Anglia Ruskin University; University of Chester; University of Birmingham; University of Glasgow (Routledge, 2018-05-29)
      Practical theology as a subject area has grown and become more sophisticated in its methods and self-understanding over the last few decades. In doing so, it has become increasingly methodologically sophisticated and theoretically self-aware. This book provides a complete and original research primer in the major theories, approaches and methods at the cutting-edge of research in contemporary practical theology. It represents a reflection on the very practice of the discipline itself, its foundational questions and epistemological claims. Each chapter examines different aspects of the research process: starting with experience and practice, aspects of research design and epistemology, communities of learning, the influence of theological norms and tradition on the practice of research, and ethical considerations about what constitutes ‘the good’ in advanced research. It offers worked examples from the authors, their colleagues and research students that serve to illustrate key ideas and approaches in practical theological research.
    • The Jew in the eruv, the Jew in the Suburb: Contesting the public face and the private space of British Jewry

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-03-27)
      Has cultural intolerance of Jews (and other minorities) in modern-day Britain led many Jews to prefer societal 'invisibility'? This chapter questions how such a discourse has played out through Jewish spatial practices and the British-Jewish presentation of those spatial practices, from the immigrant 'ghetto' of the fin de siècle East End to heated debates around the construction of an eruv in north-west London in recent decades.
    • ‘Killer Consumptive in the Wild West: the Posthumous Decline of Doc Holliday’

      Tankard, Alex; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-07-08)
      This chapter discusses how representations of consumptive Wild West gunfighter 'Doc' Holliday in life-writing and film have changed since the 1880s, and suggests that this reflects changing attitudes towards tuberculosis and disability over time.
    • Martyrdom

      Middleton, Paul; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-05-23)
      An overview of martyrdom in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
    • Media, power and representation

      Neary, Clara; Ringrow, Helen; University of Chester; University of Portsmouth (Routledge, 2018-06-20)
      As the ubiquity and potential influence of the media increase, the language and imagery used to create meaning in this domain are of continued and enhanced interest to English Language researchers. While ‘the media’ or even ‘the English-speaking media’ is not one homogenous entity, the term is used throughout this chapter to refer broadly to a collection of media types such as newspapers, television, radio and so on. Media English can be understood as referring to the ways in which reality is linguistically constructed through these platforms. Additionally, media institutions play a significant role not only in terms of communication but also by way of ‘mediating society to itself’ (Matheson 2005: 1) in that the media helps to construct societal norms and values. Media language is distinctive because media discourses can be ‘fixed’ (i.e. recorded for posterity) as well as being interactive (people can react to subject matter, often using media forms to publically share their response(s), themselves becoming producers of media content). In investigating Media English, scholars analyse overall styles or genres in order to explore and challenge particular choices of language and/or imagery within a given media text.
    • Memories of Suburbia: Autobiographical Fiction and Minority Narratives

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-04-02)
      Historians have recently begun to engage with fiction as a compelling and elucidative historical source. Novels deemed to engender autobiographical qualities have garnered particular attention for their presumed historical ‘authenticity’, yet memory work encoded within their narratives has rarely been considered. This chapter explores how memory functions within and through the conceptualisation of place within The Buddha of Suburbia (1990); White Teeth (2000) and Disobedience (2006). Bound up in apparently familiar images of London’s peripheries are individual remembrances of the past which intersect with and problematise collective memories of suburbia, and complicate the relationship between history, memory, fiction and identity.
    • ‘Mind what gap?’: an interview with Hilary Mantel

      Pollard, Eileen J.; Manchester Metropolitan University (Routledge, 2015-04-02)
      Hilary Mantel is a contemporary British writer who has published eleven novels, one memoir and two collections of short stories. A relatively unknown and under-researched author, she shot to fame in 2009 by winning the Booker Prize for her historical novel Wolf Hall – an intelligently sensitive account of Thomas Cromwell’s spectacular rise from black- smith’s son to right-hand man of Henry VIII. I interviewed Mantel at her Devon home in September 2012, just one month prior to her making literary history by winning the Booker Prize for a second time for her follow-up to Wolf Hall. This staggering achievement made her the first woman to win the prize twice, the first British author to gain a double, with Bring Up the Bodies becoming the first sequel to ever receive the award. She remarked on accepting the prize: ‘Well I don’t know, you wait twenty years for a Booker Prize . . . Two come along at once!’ A characteristically humorous and self-deprecating response that she qualified by saying she had no expectations of standing at the podium for a third time when the final instalment of her Tudor trilogy, The Mirror and the Light, is published. We pursued an engaging, vivid and wide-ranging conversation in the sitting room of her top floor flat, which overlooks the bay. Mantel and I discussed her roots in the Derbyshire village of Hadfield where I also grew up and where there is now a blue plaque marking her childhood home. In particular, we considered the figure of the ellipsis, since the ambiguities inherent to elliptical thinking seem so to suit the uncertain bases of her writing, as I hope this interview helps to illustrate.
    • The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel From the Union to the Famine

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-08-29)
      This chapter examines the peculiar characteristics of the Irish hotel in the period between the Act of Union and the Great Famine, when tourism was newly established in Ireland. The ‘moral economy’ of the inn or hotel was perceived as an extrapolation of that of the estate, or of Ireland itself. Viewed by many guests as primitive, lacking the neatness, cleanliness, and order they expected in British hotels, the Irish hotel functioned with double responsibilities: to the comfort of their guests, but also to the weal of the local community, providing work, relief, and begging opportunities for the poorest.
    • An Ongoing Tradition: Aronofsky’s Noah as 21st-Century Rewritten Scripture

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-05-09)
      Described by its director, Darren Aronofsky, as “the least biblical biblical film ever made,” Noah (2014) generated a huge amount of controversy among some Christian groups for its perceived radical departure from the biblical text. This article argues (i) that the departure is not in fact so great as some have claimed (with many apparent innovations grounded in pseudepigraphal and rabbinic literature), and (ii) that the strategies employed by the filmmakers reflect a retelling of the story which is in fact very much in line with the motivation and literary techniques of an expanded ancient tradition. It begins by noting the origins and development of the Israelite flood narrative, from its ancient Near Eastern roots through to the biblical account, before examining its continuing evolution through extrabiblical Second Temple and rabbinic literature (e.g., Jubilees, the Genesis Apocryphon, Genesis Rabbah, etc.) as part of an ongoing process of elaboration, clarification, interpretation, explanation, and harmonization. Through a close examination of the “innovative” material in Aronofsky’s film, the aims, techniques, and execution of the biblical epic in general, and Noah in particular, are shown to be thoroughly in line with those of so-called rewritten scripture, such that the film sits comfortably on a spectrum/continuum of “rewriting” the flood narrative that stretches back to the biblical text itself and beyond. Accordingly, this article considers what it means for a film to be “biblical”, arguing with regard to Noah that instances of departure from the text are in fact anticipated in, and/or entirely consistent with, an expanded “biblical” tradition, effectively rendering the film an example of 21st-century rewritten scripture.