• How the Other Three-Quarters Lived: The Cabin in Famine Literature

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2019-01-23)
      In the 1841 census three-quarters of houses in Ireland were placed in the lowest two classes, one-roomed mud cabins and slightly larger mud cottages. What Harriet Martineau describes as ‘Irish cabin life’ was a matter of fascination for visitors to Ireland before and after the Famine, and the cabin became a key site of ethnographic exploration. Curious or philanthropic observers were either shocked by the poverty and wretchedness they saw, or puzzled or even offended by the seeming happiness and healthiness of cabin-dwellers. During the Famine, the cabin was a scene for tragedy and horror: the place from which the people were evicted, from which they emigrated, in which they were quarantined, where they were found dying or dead, where they were buried. The roofless cabin later eloquently attested to their suffering and absence, and has become one of the most significant visual icons in the commemoration of the Famine. This chapter examines the representation of the cabin in literature from the time of the Famine to the present day, in the works of authors such as William Carleton, Anthony Trollope, Margaret Brew, Carol Birch, Anne Enright, and Tana French, considering the ways in which social hierarchy and communal relations are mediated through its space in texts set during the Famine, and its spectral significance in modern and contemporary literature as a concrete or symbolic inheritance, a time-machine, a haunted house, a place to desecrate or take refuge in, and a crime scene.
    • Interdependent Autonomy: Face-to-Face and Digital Media in Modern Language Learning

      Fonseca-Mora, M. Carmen; Gant, Mark; Herrero Machanocoses, Francisco; University of Huelva; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2017-05-26)
      This chapter reflects on the role of face-to-face and digital supported learning in higher education in the UK. By means of a survey conducted among language learners the authors anlyse the learner's use of technologies and their preferences and attitudes towards online, face-to-face and blended language learning.
    • La place de la République dans la littérature française ontemporaine

      OBERGÖKER, Timo; University of Chester
      This book endeavours to better understand France and the French through the lens of the place the idea of the Republic has in their collective imagery. The book starts at the round-about, leading everywhere and nowhere, and then visits several places encapsulating what Fernand Braudel has called "The French identity".
    • Mai 68, une approche transatlantique

      OBERGÖKER, Timo; HENNUY, Jean-Frédéric; University of Chester
      The book is the result of a workshop held in 2018 at the German Association of French Studies in Osnabrück. It raises questions around May 68 as an international event, particularly at the Francophone periphery, in Montréal, in the Canadian Maritimes, in Belgium.
    • Religionless Christianity in a complexly religious and secular world: Thinking through and beyond Bonhoeffer

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2008-04-10)
      This book chapter aims to appropriate the inner-logics of Bonhoeffer's discussion of religionless in order to help reflect on the complex contemporary religious and secular situation in which religion is increasingly recognised as a geo-political concern.
    • Rhythms, repititions and rewriting in Passion Simple by Annie Ernaux

      Garvey, Brenda; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2008-06-07)
      This book chapter discusses Passion simple (1992) by Annie Ernaux.
    • Le sapeur - Un dandy postcolonial?

      Obergöker, Timo; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2017-11-09)
      The Sape, a sartorial colourful movement of exuberance, developed in the colonial Congos under the colonial regimes. The origins are uncertain and surrounded by numerous mysteries, it is undeniable though that the movement is linked to second-hand clothes imported to the Congos from Paris and Brussels. The text presents the different myths around the origins of the SAPE and shows how it reflects in contemporary French-speaking literature. Postcolonial thinkers have often considered the movement as “homosocial” in the sense that Eve Sedgwick gave to the term. We are going to challenge this perspective by arguing that it is the marginal position of the Sapeur plus his desire to be perceived as a dandy which create this “homosocial” impression. His lack of capital is the major difference from the historical dandy.
    • Waking the bones: The return of the famine dead in contemporary Irish literature

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2014-12-22)