• The ‘despised trade’ in textiles: H. G. Wells, William Paine, Charles Cavers and the male draper’s life, 1870–1914

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Maney, 2015-04-28)
      This essay examines the situation of the male draper in terms of his relationships to textiles and female customers between the 1870s and the outbreak of the First World War. Drawing on accounts of shop work produced by men employed as drapers and drapers’ assistants, the essay highlights the ridicule levelled against men who sold textiles, their work with fabrics and clothing, as well as the service they provided for an almost exclusively female clientele, being widely derided as unsuitable labour for a man. One draper recorded that his was ‘a despised trade’. Through an analysis of three first-hand accounts of the draper’s lot the essay raises questions about social constructions of masculinity in relation to representations of shop work and the handling of fabrics. The essay focuses on H. G. Wells’s descriptions of his teenage years as a draper’s apprentice recorded in his Experiment in Autobiography (1934); William Paine’s political treatise, Shop Slavery and Emancipation (1912), based on the injustices he experienced as a draper’s assistant; and the diary of a Bond Street draper, Charles Cavers, posthumously published as Hades! The Ladies! Being Extracts from the Diary of a Draper (1933).
    • Feathered friends: Birds in early Anglo-Saxon burial rites

      Nugent, Ruth; University of Chester (Maney, 2011)
      This note discusses a study concerning the fragmentary remains of birds in early Anglo-Saxon burials.
    • Frailty and flourishing: Good news for humanity: Response to Alister McGrath

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Maney, 2011)
      This journal article is a response to Alister McGrath’s keynote lecture to the annual conference of the British and Irish Association for Practical Theology in London on 12 July 2011. It focuses on the themes of the relationship between theology and practice; the practice of ‘attentiveness’ and the nature of virtue or the virtues; and the connections between religion, well-being and flourishing.
    • Symbol stones in context: Excavations at Rhynie, an undocumented Pictish power centre of the 6th-7th centuries AD?

      Noble, Gordon; Gondek, Meggen M.; University of Aberdeen ; University of Chester (Maney, 2011)
      This article discusses an evaluative excavation at Rhynie in Aberdeenshire, on a Pictish Class I symbol stone and findspot of two further early medieval carved stones.