• Awakening Senses for Language Learning

      Foncubierta, José Manuel; Gant, Mark; Universidad de Cádiz; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2016-10-01)
      The chapter explores how multisensory approaches to language learning can enhance learning, helping it to become more experiential, engaging and intense by harnessing the potential of visual images and melodies to connect with learners' affective and emotional capacities and to thereby increase memory skills and motivation.
    • ‘“Like a wail from the tomb, / But of world-waking power”: James Clarence Mangan’s “A Vision: A. D. 1848”, The Great Famine and the Young Ireland Rising’

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2007-06-01)
      This book chapter discusses the poems of James Clarence Mangan.
    • Melodies, rhythm and cognition in foreign language learning

      Fonseca-Mora, M. Carmen; Gant, Mark; University of Huelva; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2016-10-01)
      Melodies, Rhythm and Cognition in Foreign Language Learning is a collection of essays reflecting on the relationship between language and music, two unique, innate human capacities. This book provides a clear explanation of the centrality of melodies and rhythm to foreign language learning acquisition. The interplay between language music brings to applied linguists inquiries into the nature and function of speech melodies, the role of prosody and the descriptions of rhythmical patterns in verbal behaviour. Musical students seem to be better equipped for language learning, although melodies and rhythm can benefit all types of students at any age. In fact, in this book melodies and rhythm are considered to be a springboard for the enhancement of the learning of foreign languages.
    • New Journeys in Iberian Studies: A (Trans)National and (Trans)Regional Exploration

      Gant, Mark; Ruzzante, Paco; Hatton, Anneliese; University of Chester; University of Cambridge; University of Nottingham (Cambridge Scholars, 2018-08-01)
      The research collected in this volume consists of 18 chapters which explore a number of key areas of investigation in contemporary Iberian studies. As the title suggests, there is a strong emphasis on trans-national and trans-regional approaches to the subject area, reflecting current discourse and scholarship, but the contributions are not limited by these approaches and include an eclectic range of recent work by scholars of history, politics, literature, the visual arts and cultural and social studies, often working in transdisciplinary ways. The geographical scope of the transnational processes considered range from intra-Iberian interconnections to those with the UK, Italy and Morocco, as well as transatlantic influences between the Peninsula and Argentina, Cuba and Brazil. The book opens up some pioneering new directions in research in Iberian studies, as well as variety of fresh approaches to hitherto neglected aspects of more familiar issues.
    • Notes Towards the Definition of the Short-Short Story

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2008-09-01)
      The first academic study of flash fiction.
    • Political tapestries of Philip the Bold and John the Fearless

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2012-08-01)
      This article challenges the idea of medieval tapestry as 'propaganda' and explores the multifaceted functions of tapestries that depicted political events during the rules of the dukes of Burgundy 1364-1477.
    • Revisiting Centres and Peripheries in Iberian Studies: Culture, History and Socio-economic Change

      Gant, Mark; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2019-08-05)
      The centres and peripheries that form the focus of the book are markedly diverse and interdisciplinary in nature. In terms of geography these range from considerations of transnational influences in the wider Hispanic and Lusophone worlds to a closer focus particular regions such as Catalonia or Asturias. The historical and transhistorical processes studied are also varied in character, with consideration given to a number of cases of economic and political change from the late nineteenth century to the present. In terms of cultural representations, more marginal social groups including migrants, children and the elderly are considered as well as those excluded in periods of dictatorship or by the developing democracies. Themes of memory, identity, regionalisms and nationalisms are frequently salient in the interconnectivities across time and space which the volume explores. Contributors are drawn established academics and early career researchers from the UK, Ireland, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Japan, Costa Rica and the USA.