• Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Negotiating Religious Voices in Public Spaces

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2016-08-03)
      Western society is entering an unprecedented political and cultural era in which many of the assumptions of classic sociological theory and of main¬¬stream public theology are being overturned. Whilst many of the features of the trajectory of religious decline, typical of Western modernity, are still apparent, there are compelling and vibrant signs of religious revival, not least in public life and politics - local, national and global. A number of scholars have adopted the terminology of the ‘post-secular’ to denote this supposedly problematic co-existence of re¬vitalized religious activism as a decisive force in public life, both globally and locally, along¬side the continuing trajectory of organisational rel¬igi¬ous decline, accompanied by robust de¬fence of secularism in Western societies. This new dispensation of ‘post-secularity’ presents novel challenges for the way in which religious voices are mediated into public spaces. They must learn to negotiate a path between the ‘rock’ of religious revival and the ‘hard place’ of secularism.
    • The blessed trinity: The army, the navy, and providence in the conduct of warfare, 1688-1713

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2009-03-23)
      This book chapter discusses how the perceived necessity of Divine intervention and the contribution of an art of war in-theatre grounded upon rational precepts was an increasing feature of warfare in the late seventeenth century.
    • Charlotte Brontë’s Frocks and Shirley’s Queer Textiles

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2013-04-23)
      This chapter discusses the role of textiles and fashion in Charlotte Brontë’s novel, Shirley (1849). It argues that Brontë uses sewing and fashion as a way of representing female bonds. This is contrasted with her representations of the 'male' world of the mill-owner.
    • Circulation and Stasis: Feminine Property in the Novels of Charles Dickens

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2012-07-16)
      This chapter explores the figure of Miss Havisham, and other female characters, in Charles Dickens's Great Expectations (1860). It argues that the novel's exploration of portable property, usually discussed in terms of Wemmick, is particularly focused on the museal qualities of Miss Havisham's Satis House and the objects it contains.
    • Cordelia's can't: Rhetorics of reticence and (dis)ease in King Lear

      Rees, Emma L. E.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-12-01)
      Susan Sontag in "Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors" points to the vital connection between metaphors and bodily illnesses, and though her analyses deals mainly with modern literary works. This collection of essays examines the vast extent to which rhetorical figures related to sickness and health - metaphor, simile, pun, analogy, symbol, personification, allegory, oxymoron, and metonymy - inform medieval and early modern literature, religion, science, and medicine in England and its surrounding European context. In keeping with the critical trend over the past decade to foreground the matter of the body and the emotions, these essays track the development of sustained, nuanced rhetorics of bodily disease and health-physical, emotional, and spiritual. The contributors to this collection approach their intriguing subjects from a wide range of timely, theoretical, and interdisciplinary perspectives, including the philosophy of language, semiotics, and linguistics; ecology; women's and gender studies; religion; and, the history of medicine. The essays focus on works by Dante, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton among others; the genres of epic, lyric, satire, drama, and the sermon; and cultural history artifacts such as medieval anatomies, the arithmetic of plague bills of mortality, meteorology, and medical guides for healthy regimens.
    • Ethics in crisis: Interpreting Barth's ethics

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2005-08-26)
      This work depicts the contemporary crisis in Christian ethical thought and offers a constructive proposal for responding to this crisis. The constructive proposal draws on a new and persuasive interpretation of the ethics of Karl Barth developed in the central section of the book. The aims of the work are three-fold: (1) to draw attention to the failure of Christian ethicists to speak in a way that can be heard in contemporary ethical debate; (2) to demonstrate that Karl Barth’s ethical thought should be interpreted dialectically, in the light of his response to the crisis of the Römerbrief; (3) to make a proposal for how the crisis of speechlessness in contemporary Christian ethics may be overcome, drawing on this dialectical interpretation of Barth’s ethics.
    • Fighting at the command of God: Reassessing the borderline case in Karl Barth’s account of war in the Church dogmatics

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2004-12-21)
      This book chapter discusses Karl Barth's attitudes to warfare and pacifism.
    • In the chamber, in the grade robe, in the chapel, in a chest': The Possession and Uses of Luxury Textiles. The Case of Later Medieval Dijon

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      Throughout human history luxury textiles have been used as a marker of importance, power and distinction. Yet, as the essays in this collection make clear, the term ‘luxury’ is one that can be fraught with difficulties for historians. Focusing upon the consumption, commercialisation and production of luxury textiles in Italy and the Low Countries during the late medieval and early modern period, this volume offers a fascinating exploration of the varied and subtle ways that luxury could be interpreted and understood in the past. Beginning with the consumption of luxury textiles, it takes the reader on a journey back from the market place, to the commercialisation of rich fabrics by an international network of traders, before arriving at the workshop to explore the Italian and Burgundian world of production of damasks, silks and tapestries. The first part of the volume deals with the consumption of luxury textiles, through an investigation of courtly purchases, as well as urban and clerical markets, before the chapters in part two move on to explore the commercialisation of luxury textiles by merchants who facilitated their trade from the cities of Lucca, Florence and Venice. The third part then focusses upon manufacture, encouraging consideration of the concept of luxury during this period through the Italian silk industry and the production of high-quality woollens in the Low Countries. Graeme Small draws the various themes of the volume together in a conclusion that suggests profitable future avenues of research into this important subject.
    • An Introduction to Ford Madox Ford

      Chantler, Ashley; Hawkes, Rob; University of Chester. University of Teesside (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      For students and readers new to the work of Ford Madox Ford, this volume provides a comprehensive introduction to one of the most complex, important and fascinating authors. Bringing together leading Ford scholars, the volume places Ford’s work in the context of significant literary, artistic and historical events and movements. Individual essays consider Ford’s theory of literary Impressionism and the impact of the First World War; illuminate The Good Soldier and Parade’s End; engage with topics such as the city, gender, national identity and politics; discuss Ford as an autobiographer, poet, propagandist, sociologist, Edwardian and modernist; and show his importance as founding editor of the groundbreaking English Review and transatlantic review. The volume encourages detailed close reading of Ford’s writing and illustrates the importance of engaging with secondary sources.
    • A lifetime of service in the Roman Church

      Doran, John; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2009-01-28)
      This book chapter discusses the career of Pope Celestine, focusing on his time in the city of Rome.
    • Literature and authenticity, 1780-1900: Essays in honour of Vincent Newey

      Chantler, Ashley; Davies, Michael; Shaw, Philip; University of Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University of Leicester (Ashgate, 2011-10-28)
      Individually and collectively, these essays establish a new direction for scholarship that examines the crucial activities of reading and writing about literature and how they relate to 'authenticity'. Though authenticity is a term deep in literary resonance and rich in philosophical complexity, its connotations relative to the study of literature have rarely been explored or exploited through detailed, critical examination of individual writers and their works. Here the notion of the authentic is recognised first and foremost as central to a range of literary and philosophical ways of thinking, particularly for nineteenth-century poets and novelists. Distinct from studies of literary fakes and forgeries, this collection focuses on authenticity as a central paradigm for approaching literature and its formation that bears on issues of authority, self-reliance, truth, originality, the valid and the real, and the genuine and inauthentic, whether applied to the self or others. Topics and authors include: the spiritual autobiographies of William Cowper and John Newton; Ruskin and travel writing; British Romantic women poets; William Wordsworth and P.B. Shelley; Robert Southey and Anna Seward; John Keats; Lord Byron; Elizabeth Gaskell; Henry David Thoreau; Henry Irving; and Joseph Conrad. The volume also includes a note on Professor Vincent Newey with a bibliography of his critical writings.
    • Luxury textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and neighbouring territories (14th to 16th centuries): a conceptual investigation

      Wilson, Katherine A.; Lambert, Bart; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      Throughout human history luxury textiles have been used as a marker of importance, power and distinction. Yet, as the essays in this collection make clear, the term 'luxury' is one that can be fraught with difficulties for historians. Focusing upon the consumption, commercialisation and production of luxury textiles in Italy and the Low Countries during the late medieval and early modern period, this volume offers a fascinating exploration of the varied and subtle ways that luxury could be interpreted and understood in the past. Beginning with the consumption of luxury textiles, it takes the reader on a journey back from the market place, to the commercialisation of rich fabrics by an international network of traders, before arriving at the workshop to explore the Italian and Burgundian world of production of damasks, silks and tapestries. The first part of the volume deals with the consumption of luxury textiles, through an investigation of courtly purchases, as well as urban and clerical markets, before the chapters in part two move on to explore the commercialisation of luxury textiles by merchants who facilitated their trade from the cities of Lucca, Florence and Venice. The third part then focusses upon manufacture, encouraging consideration of the concept of luxury during this period through the Italian silk industry and the production of high-quality woollens in the Low Countries. Graeme Small draws the various themes of the volume together in a conclusion that suggests profitable future avenues of research into this important subject.
    • Luxury Textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and Neighbouring Territories (Fourteenth to Sixteenth Centuries): A Conceptual Investigation

      Lambert, Bart; Wilson, Katherine A.; Durham University and Chester University (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      Throughout human history luxury textiles have been used as a marker of importance, power and distinction. Yet, as the essays in this collection make clear, the term ‘luxury’ is one that can be fraught with difficulties for historians. Focusing upon the consumption, commercialisation and production of luxury textiles in Italy and the Low Countries during the late medieval and early modern period, this volume offers a fascinating exploration of the varied and subtle ways that luxury could be interpreted and understood in the past. Beginning with the consumption of luxury textiles, it takes the reader on a journey back from the market place, to the commercialisation of rich fabrics by an international network of traders, before arriving at the workshop to explore the Italian and Burgundian world of production of damasks, silks and tapestries. The first part of the volume deals with the consumption of luxury textiles, through an investigation of courtly purchases, as well as urban and clerical markets, before the chapters in part two move on to explore the commercialisation of luxury textiles by merchants who facilitated their trade from the cities of Lucca, Florence and Venice. The third part then focusses upon manufacture, encouraging consideration of the concept of luxury during this period through the Italian silk industry and the production of high-quality woollens in the Low Countries. Graeme Small draws the various themes of the volume together in a conclusion that suggests profitable future avenues of research into this important subject.
    • Theology without words: Theology in the deaf community

      Morris, Wayne; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2008-07-28)
      This book is a study of theology in the deaf community. It examines the issues facing the deaf community in undertaking theological research.
    • Thiselton on hermeneutics: The collected works and new essays of Anthony Thiselton

      Thiselton, Anthony; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2006-11-29)
      This book provides select expositions and critical discussions of hermeneutics as a multidisciplinary area.
    • A well-spun yarn: Margaret Cavendish and Homer's Penelope

      Rees, Emma L. E.; Chester College of Higher Education (Ashgate, 2003)
    • What's right with the Trinity? Conversations in feminist theology

      Bacon, Hannah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2009-12-18)
      This book discusses the doctrine of the Trinity and the problems it poses for feminist theology.
    • Woman and personal property in the Victorian novel

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-11-28)
      This book discusses female possession of property in the works of Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Henry James.
    • Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-11-28)
      How key changes to the married women’s property laws contributed to new ways of viewing women in society are revealed in Deborah Wynne’s study of literary representations of women and portable property during the period 1850 to 1900. While critical explorations of Victorian women’s connections to the material world have tended to focus on their relationships to commodity culture, Wynne argues that modern paradigms of consumerism cannot be applied across the board to the Victorian period. Until the passing of the 1882 Married Women’s Property Act, many women lacked full property rights; evidence suggests that, for women, objects often functioned not as disposable consumer products but as cherished personal property. Focusing particularly on representations of women and material culture in Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Henry James, Wynne shows how novelists engaged with the vexed question of women’s relationships to property. Suggesting that many of the apparently insignificant items that ‘clutter’ the Victorian realist novel take on new meaning when viewed through the lens of women’s access to material culture and the vagaries of property law, her study opens up new possibilities for interpreting female characters in Victorian fiction and reveals the complex work of ‘thing culture’ in literary texts.