• Beyond Ecotheology

      Clough, David; University of Chester (2012-12-10)
      This piece offers an outline argument for moving beyond ecotheology, not because its project was mistaken or the challenges to which it responded have been overcome, but because ecotheology is too important to be left to ecotheologians. Instead, the paper argues that no responsible theological project can afford to neglect the concerns that ecotheology has championed up to this point.
    • Book Reviews: Advancing Trinitarian Theology; Two Views on the Doctrine of the Trinity

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Sage, 2016-02-17)
      Book review of two recent collections of essays in trinitarian theology.
    • Jan-Olav Henriksen, Christianity as Distinct Practices: A Complicated Relationship (T&T Clark, 2019).

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester
      Review of Henriksen's book in which he argues that Christianity (and religion in general) has been perceived, both within the academy and society at large, as primarily an intellectual undertaking, whereas it should more properly be considered as ‘a cluster of practices that taken together manifest a distinct historically and contextually shaped mode of being in the world’. While Henriksen is not unique amongst contemporary scholars in regarding ‘religion as practice’ and ‘theology as practical’, it is his attempt to forge connections between the two and to pursue the logic of a philosophical reading of religion as practice through to a theological reading of the distinctive qualities of Christian practices that is of particular significance.
    • Nicholas E. Lombardo, O.P. The Father’s Will. Christ’s Crucifixion and the Goodness of God

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Sage Publications, 2015-02-23)
      Book review
    • Nicola Slee, Fran Porter and Anne Phillips (eds), Researching Female Faith: Qualitative Research Methods (2018)

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester
      This article is a book review of the edited collection, 'Researching Female Faith'. The volume is a successor to 'Faith Lives of Women and Girls', published in 2013, and represents further work to emerge from a network of feminist qualitative researchers in practical theology which has been meeting since 2010.
    • Review of Shortt, R. (2019) Outgrowing Dawkins: God for Grown-Ups. London: SPCK.

      Graham, Elaine; University of Chester
      This book is a direct response to Richard Dawkins’ book Outgrowing God: a beginner’s guide (Bantam Press, 2019) and continues Shortt’s long-standing engagement with New Atheism in such works as God Is No Thing (2015) and Does Religion Do More Harm than Good (2019). The substance of Shortt’s defence of religion is not that it does not have its destructive and dark sides, or even that atheism and religious doubt may not be legitimate intellectual positions. Rather, Shortt takes issue with charges that religious belief is illogical and intellectually specious, that religious commitment is deluded and infantile and religious institutions inherently barbaric and authoritarian.