• The blessed trinity: The army, the navy, and providence in the conduct of warfare, 1688-1713

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2009-03-23)
      This book chapter discusses how the perceived necessity of Divine intervention and the contribution of an art of war in-theatre grounded upon rational precepts was an increasing feature of warfare in the late seventeenth century.
    • Combined operations and the European theatre during the Nine Years' War, 1688-97

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University College Chester (Blackwell, 2005-06-28)
      This article discusses the strategic and operational purpose of England's combined army-navy operations within the European theatre during the Nine Years' War, 1688-97. Specifically, the historical consensus that these operations were simply a compromise product of the contemporary political discourse, and consistently suffered from poor preparation and implementation, is reassessed. In so doing, the article considers the combined service descents planned and executed against the northern French coastline between 1691 and 1694, including in particular the renowned operation at Brest in June 1694, and also those operations undertaken by Admiral Russell's Mediterranean fleet in 1695.
    • 'A Mediterranean amphibian': British warfare, 1693-1713

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (Malta University Publishers, 2007-04)
    • The Restoration and the Glorious Revolution, 1660-1702

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (Edinburgh University Press, 2012-07-20)
      This book chapter examines the role of the very modest Scottish standing force from the restoration of King Charles II in 1660 through to the outbreak of the War of the Spanish Succession in in 1702.
    • Sir Francis Wheler's Caribbean and North American expedition, 1693: A case study in combined operational command during the reign of William III

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2007-11-01)
      This article uses the evidence of an amphibious campaign undertaken first in the Caribbean and then off the north-eastern American seaboard during the Nine Years War, 1688—97 to rejuvenate an understanding of combined operational command, which harks back to the views of the principal eighteenth-century author on amphibious warfare, Thomas More Molyneaux. In this analysis, combined operational command is shown to be a negotiated operational construct between the service commanders and the government, as a result of which disagreements related to the command structure and the subsequent dilution of authority through an executive council of war significantly impacted upon operational success.
    • Wellsprings of a 'World War': An early English attempt to conquer Canada during King William's war, 1688-97

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (2006-06-10)
      This article discusses the military history of the early years of King William's War, 1688-97, including an early attempt to conquer French Canada in 1690 by Sir William Phips. The article places this within differeing interpretations of the military historiography of early modern colonial America.