• The changing dynamic of stigma

      Whitehead, Elizabeth; Mason, Tom; Carlisle, Caroline; Watkins, Caroline; Chester College of Higher Education ; Caswell Clinic/University of Glamorgan ; University of Liverpool ; University of Manchester (Routledge, 2001-07-12)
      This book chapter discusses the experience of stigma within social, political, media, and cultural influences
    • Constructing the Social, Constructing Social Work

      Harlow, Elizabeth; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-06-06)
      Over recent times, social work has faced many challenges. This chapter does not focus on these challenges, but takes them into account when giving consideration to the construction of the profession in general, and the welfare regime of which it is a part. In giving consideration to this construction, the meaning of the ‘social’ component of ‘social work’ is deemed to be important to the identity of the profession, along with the socio-economic context from which it emerged, and to which it currently belongs. This theoretical foundation calls into question the essentialism of a fixed professional identity, but it also assumes that there is a body of practice known as social work which, over time has become associated with some prevailing features. A chronological approach to the construction of social work is taken and then a case study is offered. A concluding discussion follows on from the case study.
    • Diversity in ageing, reductive welfare and potential new ways of utilising ethics in social work with Older People

      Carey, Malcolm; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-01-15)
      This chapter examines some ethical and political challenges generated by the increasingly complex needs of an ageing society upon social work. It concentrates on the UK as a case study and critically evaluates related age-graded policies and practices relating to social work and care. The chapter includes a discussion of the on-going tensions between social diversity within an ageing society and the shrinking of formal care provision, alongside the impact of professional codes of ethics.
    • Facilitating students towards self-directed learning

      Regan, Julie-Anne (Routledge, 2005-03-17)
      This chapter discusses a study which focused on students' perspectives of self-directed learning. The study was structured around 5 questions - what do students understand by the term self-directed learning, how effective do students feel self-directed learning is, what support do students percieve as necessary for effective self-directed learning, what do students feel are the barriers to self-directed learning, and what motivates students towards self-directed learning.
    • Historical developments

      Whitehead, Elizabeth; Carlisle, Caroline; Watkins, Caroline; Mason, Tom; Chester College of Higher Education ; University of Liverpool ; Manchester University ; Caswell Clinic/University of Glamorgan (Routledge, 2001-07-12)
      This book chapter discusses stigma and social exclusion within a historical context, focusing on the work of Durkheim, Goffman, Edward Jones, & Scambler.
    • Issues of Ageing, Social Class, and Poverty

      Carey, Malcolm (Routledge, 2019-01-18)
      This chapter examines some ethical and political challenges generated by the increasingly complex needs of an ageing society upon social work. It concentrates on the UK as a case study and critically evaluates related age-graded policies and practices relating to social work and care. The chapter includes a discussion of the on-going ethical tensions between social diversity within an ageing society and the shrinking of formal care provision.
    • Manifesto for change

      Carlisle, Caroline; Watkins, Caroline; Mason, Tom; Whitehead, Elizabeth; University of Liverpool ; Manchester University ; Caswell Clinic/University of Glamorgan ; Chester College of Higher Education (Routledge, 2001-07-12)
      This book chapter offers suggestions for healthcare professionals working with people who may be stigmatised. It offers suggestions on how practice may be taken forward in the areas of education, reserch and development, and individual professional practice.
    • Mental Health and the Elderly Population

      Lovell, Andy; Moncur, Thomas; University of Chester; Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (Routledge, 2015-11-02)
      This chapter provides an overview of the relationship between the elderly population and the society of which it is part, and how this has changed and developed across the globe over recent decades. The chapter begins by considering the statistics that convey how ageing is beginning to alter the structure of populations, and how there is now a significant difference according to different parts of the world. A broader discussion around ageism, discrimination and stigma then contextualizes the study according to the role of the elderly in particular societies and how this is influenced by issues such conventional approaches to retirement and a need to re-think what it means to be elderly. The chapter then goes on to address current concerns of dementia, gender and end of life issues. One of the authors, Thomas Moncur, goes on to provide a reflective piece on working with the age group clinically, including two clinically-related case studies exploring the impact of the ageing process on specific individuals.
    • ‘Paradigm shift? Biomedical science and social work thinking’

      Carey, Malcolm; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-07-17)
      This chapter examines the relationship between biomedical science and social work thinking. It looks at the similarities and differences between two unique but increasingly closely associated ‘helping professions’. As part of the discussion, the role of paradigm, power and ideological disparities and distinct traditions are stressed, as well as the impact of ongoing policy-led reforms which continue to bring each profession closer together.
    • Public health in nurse education

      Mabhala, Mzwandile; University of Chester
      This study is about PHNEs’ knowledge of teaching public health, and therefore it was considered worthwhile to explore the literature relating to the pedagogies used generally in nursing education, and to teach public health in particular. The exploration of literature revealed two broad pedagogic approaches that underpin nursing education: conventional and interpretive pedagogies. This section presents three examples of interpretive pedagogies – narrative, critical and transformative –that were found to be commonly used in public health nursing.
    • Relationship to practice

      Watkins, Caroline; Carlisle, Caroline; Whitehead, Elizabeth; Mason, Tom; Manchester University ; University of Liverpool ; Chester College of Higher Education ; Clinic/University of Glamorgan (Routledge, 2001-07-12)
      This book chapter discusses the macro and micro levels of practical impact that theories relating to stigma can have on individuals and groups.
    • Social Work Students sharing practice learning experiences: Critical reflection as process and method.

      Walker, Jane; Gant, Valerie; University of Chester
      This paper offers a commentary regarding the centrality of critical reflection in social work before discussing a research project drawing on a sample of ten social work students as they approached the end of their social work training in one English university. The original intention of the research was to focus solely on students’ perceptions of critical reflection, but when using a more reflexive approach, we identified that participants utilised the focus groups as an opportunity to discuss their practice learning experiences per se before considering and discussing critical reflection. Most students were placed in child protection social work teams and discussed how they felt unprepared for such a fast-paced and stressful environment. Participants felt that the expectations some practitioners had of students were unrealistic, and not always commensurate with the Professional Capabilities Framework. Students highlighted the use of practice scenarios in developing their knowledge and skills particularly when considering their application of critical reflection. This study highlights the significance of adequate preparation for practice and argues for a more focused agenda for future research exploring the culture of learning, including those factors that inhibit students sharing their concerns as well as the training needs of educators
    • Some ethical limitations of privatisation within social work and social care in England for children and young people

      Carey, Malcolm; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-07-01)
      The article considers some of the ethical impications of the ongoing privatisation of social care and social work services.
    • Supporting women to give birth at home: A practical guide for midwives

      Steen, Mary; University of Chester (Routledge, 2011-11-17)
      This book describes and discusses the main challenges and issues that midwives and maternity services encounter when preparing for and attending a home birth. To ensure that a home birth is a real option for women, midwives need to be able to believe in a woman’s ability to give birth at home and to promote this birth option, providing evidence-based information about benefits and risks. This practical guide will help midwives to have the necessary skills, resources and confidence to support homebirth. The book includes: - the present birth choices a woman has - the implications homebirth has upon midwifery practice - how midwives can prepare and support women and their families - the midwife’s role and responsibilities - national and local policies, guidelines and available resources - pain management options With a range of recent home birth case studies brought together in the final chapter, this accessible text provides a valuable insight into those considering homebirth. Supporting Women to Give Birth at Home will be of interest to students studying issues around normal birth and will be an important resource for clinically based midwives, in particular community based midwives, home birth