• The effect of a short course in cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) on knowledge acquisition in non-specialist CBT practitioners

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2017-01-01)
      In this study, we investigate the effects of training on knowledge acquisition in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Knowledge acquisition is assessed through the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Knowledge Questionnaire (CBT-KQ; Myles, Latham, Ricketts, 2002). The CBT-KQ contains 26 multiple-choice questions from five conceptual topics: general CBT issues, theoretical underpinnings of behavioural approaches, theoretical underpinnings of cognitive approaches, practice of behavioural therapy, and practice of cognitive therapy. Thirty eight students attended weekly 3 hour sessions and were tested at weeks 1 and 15 in a before and after study. Improvements in the CBT-KQ were modest but showed significant changes in three conceptual topics; general CBT issues, theoretical underpinnings of cognitive approaches and practice of cognitive therapy. These findings may have important implications for structuring CBT training, so that both the cognitive and behavioural components are shown in the knowledge acquisition and practice applications. Recent evidence suggests that the behavioural components of treatment for some conditions, such as depression, may be more important than the cognitive components. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the behavioural components might be more suitable for delivery by non-specialist CBT practitioners.
    • The responsiveness of negative cognitive content to an induced negative mood state in those with and without a previous history of depression in a student sample

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2015-03-31)
      This study investigates the responsiveness of cognitions to an induced negative mood state in those with and without a previous history of depression in a non-clinical student sample (n = 101). The Automatic Thought Questionnaire (ATQ-30) was used to observe the negative cognitive content. The negative mood state was induced in small groups utilising the Velten Negative Mood Induction Procedure (VNMIP). Self-reported mood was measured using the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology (UWIST) Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL) before and after VNMIP. The effects of previous history of depression (without history or with previous history of depression) and self-reported mood (pre or post negative mood induction) on cognitive content was shown in a 2 x 2 ANOVA with time (pre-test vs. post-test) as a within subjects factor and history of depression (with a history of depression vs. without a history of depression) as a between subjects factor. The results indicate no significant interaction between time and group in their effects on negative cognitive content. Also, there was no significant main effect for time on negative cognitive content. However, there was a significant main effect for previous history of depression on negative cognitive content. Findings are discussed on the basis of the literature and possible applications for practice.