• Eight simple rules for writing in health and social care

      Chapman, Hazel M.; Keeling, June J.; Williams, Julie; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      Writing is a creative process. It transforms your own view of the world and enables you to grow and develop. This is why it is so commonly used as an assessment method, as educationalists use it to help you develop a more sophisticated understanding of your field in health and social care. In this book we have attempted to provide you with simple tools to improve your writing skills and achieve your professional goals. We have aimed to inspire you with insights into how you can use writing to help you think more deeply and flexibly about the world and how that knowledge can improve you as a practitioner. While writing and learning are refined over many years, there are some ideas in this book that can change your thoughts, feelings and behaviours quite simply and quickly, and open your mind to the simple pleasure of writing. In this concluding chapter we highlight a few of these hints and tips, and guide you to the relevant chapters to read more about them. We have identified eight simple rules for writing in health and social care. help you develop a more sophisticated understanding of your field in health and social care. In this book we have attempted to provide you with simple tools to improve your writing skills and achieve your professional goals. We have aimed to inspire you with insights into how you can use writing to help you think more deeply and flexibly about the world and how that knowledge can improve you as a practitioner. While writing and learning are refined over many years, there are some ideas in this book that can change your thoughts, feelings and behaviours quite simply and quickly, and open your mind to the simple pleasure of writing. In this concluding chapter we highlight a few of these hints and tips, and guide you to the relevant chapters to read more about them. We have identified eight simple rules for writing in health and social care.
    • Eight simple rules for writing in health and social care

      Chapman, Hazel M.; Keeling, June J.; Williams, Julie; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter highlights eight simple rules for writing in health and social care - write, plan your writing, proofread and edit your writing, look it up, reflect, record the care you give, prepare, and enjoy yourself.
    • Essentials of Medicines Management for Mental Health Nurses

      Robertson, Deborah A. F.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2016-08-01)
      Introduction Pharmacology and medicines management is something my student nurses tell me all the time, that is very important to them. They also tell me that the subject of psychopharmacology is daunting and often find the textbooks dedicated to it ‘overwhelming’, ‘difficult to understand’, ‘over our heads’, ‘not real life’ and ‘expensive’. I don’t know that I can say this book solves all of those issues, but I know that writing this book, with students (and nurses in general) in mind, has made me very aware of those issues when deciding how to lay out chapters and to display information. It also informed the choice of inclusion of case studies, clinical tips and applied scenarios. Nurses need to understand pharmacology and medicines management, yes, no question. But they also need to know how to apply this knowledge to the patients in their care. This book links theory to practice in every chapter and helps nurses transfer their learning from the page to the practice situation. Nurses often say they wish there was more pharmacology taught at undergraduate level, but as an educator I understand the pressures of a nursing programme and the importance of all the other subjects taught. However as a nurse and pharmacologist I see and understand their point. As educators we instil the importance of pharmacological knowledge and teach the basics of pharmacology to give students the ‘building blocks’ of knowledge. But each student and their experience in practice is very different, so knowing where to find and how to use information is still one of the best skills we can teach. Combine this with enthusiasm for a subject and a lifelong learner is born. Learning about medicines as a nurse is fundamental to a major component of the role they will play [medicines management] and the care they will deliver, so motivating students to learn about drugs in an easy, accessible and applicable format is essential. This book is written with that purpose in mind. There is a proverb which sums this up well for me ‘Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day; show him how to catch fish, and you feed him for a lifetime’. This book does not give you all the snapshots of pharmacological information for you to pick and eat for the day you want. It gives you basic knowledge, clinical understanding and the tools to find and apply information that will have you ‘fishing’ for pharmacological knowledge every day for the rest of your career.
    • Introduction - "How to write well: for students of health and social care"

      Keeling, June J.; Williams, Julie; Chapman, Hazel M.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      The aim of this book is to demystify academic writing for undergraduate students in health and social care education. You are probably required to submit several assignments throughout your programme of study, which may take different formats such as a written essay, a poster or a dissertation. The allocation of marks for your assignments will be primarily dependent upon two factors: content and academic writing. This book focuses on the many aspects that impact on the quality of academic writing and will help you to develop the essential skills required for your undergraduate level study and to achieve success. Academic writing is a skill that develops with practice and therefore the book takes you through a step-by-step guide of how to improve your academic writing, thereby enabling you to improve your own writing skills.
    • Making Sense of Health Improvement and Well-being

      Wilson, Frances; Massey, Alan; Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2014-10-01)
      This chapter explores concepts and definitions of health, health improvement, and well-being. These concepts will be deconstructed and critiqued in the context of underpinning theory and evidence of the individual, community and population approaches to health improvement and well-being. This is undertaken to allow the reader to appreciate the differences and similarities of these concepts. It will allow the reader to appreciate the contribution of these concepts to providing health, public health to the promotion of health improvement and well-being. The use of case studies will facilitate the integration of these concepts with practice in the fields of health, improvement, and well-being
    • Preparing to write

      Chapman, Hazel M.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores the following topics: • The psychology of writing • How to reduce stress and anxiety • Why writing is important for learning • Why do you want to write well? • A space of one’s own • Getting started and finishing well • Reading for writing – and other learning resources • Using feedback and accessing support This chapter begins by looking at how your thoughts and feelings about writing, especially writing for assessment, can affect your behaviour. Through understanding what makes you write or prevents you from writing, you can gain control over your writing behaviours, the behaviours that are key to your ultimate performance. This chapter shows the small, simple steps you can take in order to achieve your writing potential. By exploring how to break down the barriers to writing, such as stress and anxiety, this chapter shows how writing can eventually become just another activity, and even an enjoyable habit. We discuss the reasons why writing is important for helping you to learn, and help you to explore your own reasons for wanting to write. This will help you to keep writing, even when you are finding it challenging. The environment you work in is important for developing good writing habits and enabling you to write well, so the chapter discusses how you can create your own writing den and find your favourite writing haunts. Practical tips, such as where to find your ideas from, how to start writing, how to finish your writing session, and how to plan writing for assessment are included. Suggestions on using different sources of information and inspiration for your writing, how to use feedback to improve your writing, and how to get the most from university student support services are given. Writing is an important part of your life when you are studying in health and social care. This chapter helps you to put it into perspective alongside the rest of your life, so that you can approach the act of writing without fear, and develop your writing skills to achieve your full potential in your chosen field within health and social care.
    • Preparing to write

      Chapman, Hazel M.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores the psychology of writing, how to reduce stress and anxiety, why writing is important for learning and why you want to write well. The chapter also addresses getting started and finishing well.
    • Presenting your writing in different formats

      Ridgway, Victoria; Keeling, June J.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores the following topics: essays, oral presentations/examinations, poster presentation, dissertation structuring and writing, portfolio development and finally writing for publication. With key tips for each, the chapter address these concepts in detail.
    • The Social and Health Inequalities Agenda

      Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2014-10-01)
      How much the health and well-being of individuals and populations can be improved depends upon understanding the wider determinants of health and the social and health inequalities agenda. This chapter aims to build on the concepts introduced in chapter one and to explore the differences in health outcomes globally and across the UK. This will be achieved through an examination of up-to-date policy and publications such as Fair Society, Fair Lives – The Marmot Review (Department of Health [DH] 2010), Closing the Gap in a Generation (World Health Organization [WHO] 2008b), and The Impact of Inequality (Wilkinson 2005). Health outcomes can be measured, but how can health inequalities be reduced and health and well-being improved? What are the economic implications of impaired health, and how can strategic planning improve health and reduce inequalities?
    • What is reflective writing?

      Quigley, Jane; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores what reflective writing is, why reflection is important, types of reflection and the reflective models available. The chapter goes on to address critical reflective writing, how to structure a reflective essay and summaries how to write reflectively.
    • Writing for practice

      Talbot, Pat; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores how writing for practice is different from academic writing, why it is important that records are well written, what a record is, what should be recorded and how that information should be recorded. The chapter goes on to address confidentiality, access and disclosure along with the roles records have in complaints and legal claims before finally looking at writing a report or statement.