• The abused perineum

      Steen, Mary; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (Mark Allen Publishers, 1998-07-02)
      This article discusses whether too many second degree tears are being left to heal themselves, when in fact they should be sutured. There is a need for more research based evidence by randomised controlled trial to help with decisions as to the best treatment
    • Childbearing women, violence and abuse in the workplace

      Steen, Mary; Allen, Rose; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/University of Leeds (Mark Allen Publishers, 1999-07-01)
      Pregnancy may trigger or exacerbate domestic violence, but current involvement of health professionals in dealing with this is poor. A training initiative undertaken in Leeds has developed a programme to help the midwife to recognise and support women who experience violence.
    • Cold therapy and perineal wounds: Too cool or not too cool?

      Steen, Mary; Cooper, Keith; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/Leeds Metropolitan University (Mark Allen Publishers, 1998-09-03)
      Perineal trauma following childbirth often has numerous negative consequences for many women and the associated pain can dominate the experience of early motherhood. Applications of cold compresses have been in use for centuries as a form of localized treatment and these have become a generally accepted method to treat acute injuries. However, concerns have been expressed as to whether cold therapy can delay wound healing. The purpose of this article is to review the recent evidence concerning the beneficial use of cold therapy, when applied locally to perineal wounds and non-perineal wounds and to consider if such treatment may have an adverse effect on the rate of wound healing. In addition, the mechanism of the action of cold therapy is discussed. We conclude that there is no clear evidence to support the suggestion that when controlled therapy is applied to the traumatized perineum or other injured parts of the body that this will result in a delay in wound healing. Such treatment should continue until clear evidence is produced to the contrary.