• Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): The Mental Health, Resilience, and Communication Resources for the Short- and Long-term Challenges Faced by Healthcare Workers

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; Keyworth, Chris; Salas, Eduardo; Galli, Federica; Vegni, Elena; University of Chester; University of Leeds; Rice University; Sapienza University; University of Milan
      The coronavirus disease pandemic has been an exceptional time for healthcare workers who have had to adapt to new ways of communicating with each other and delivering care to their patients. Maintaining healthcare workers’ well-being and mental health during increased COVID-19 workload pressure and change in practices is needed. It is essential to have a resilient workforce that can respond to the challenges presented by the pandemic. Healthcare workers at the frontline may be more susceptible to psychological stressors such as the availability of resources to protect themselves and their patients whilst balancing this with maintaining the health and well-being of family and friends. This research topic addresses the problems and issues researchers, policymakers, and educators face when formulating the best evidence and recommendations to support healthcare workers. There is a need to collate the best available practice and share knowledge from diverse contexts so healthcare workers can deliver the best care whilst they stay physically and mentally healthy.
    • Editorial: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): The Mental Health, Resilience, and Communication Resources for the Short- and Long-term Challenges Faced by Healthcare Workers

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; Galli, Federica; Keyworth, Chris; Vegni, Elena; Salas, Eduardo; University of Chester; Sapienza University of Rome; University of Leeds; University of Milan; Rice University (Frontiers Media, 2022-04-18)
      During the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, the world initially focused on measures to suppress COVID-19 transmission and protect their populations by developing vaccines and drug treatments for the most vulnerable and a host of social actions, including implementing social distancing, working from home, travel restrictions, lockdowns, and face coverings. Nearly 2 years after the initial outbreak, at the time of writing this editorial, and through research conducted as part of this Research Topic, it is clear that the mental health impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers (HCW) are significant. There is an urgent need to understand and address these impacts (Greenberg et al., 2020). This is particularly true given the World Health Organisation has outlined a series of mental health and psychosocial considerations aimed explicitly at HCWs (World Health Organisation, 2020). The present Research Topic on Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) and HCWs has added to the scientific knowledge in several main areas, including barriers and enablers to healthcare delivery, understanding HCWs' mental health and well-being, resilience, coordination and communication within the workforce, and specific interventions to promote mental health and well-being.
    • Editorial: COVID-19-Social Science Research During a Pandemic

      Ward, Paul R.; Bissell, Paul; Meyer, Samantha B.; Gesesew, Hailay A.; Januraga, Pande Putu; Chang, Dukjin; Lombi, Linda; Torrens University; University of Chester; University of Waterloo; Mekelle University; Udayana University Denpasar; Seoul National University; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart (Frontiers Media, 2022-05-09)