• Sleep hygiene education and children with developmental disabilities:findings from a co-design study

      Sutton, Julie E.; Huws, Jaci C.; Burton, Christopher R.; University of Chester; Bangor University (SAGE publications, 2019-01-17)
      This qualitative study develops a programme theory demonstrating the complexity embedded in sleep hygiene education (SHE) as an intervention to improve sleep problems in children with developmental disabilities. In co-design workshops, eight parents and six sleep practitioners deliberated themes developed from findings of an earlier exploratory study of stakeholder perceptions of SHE. A SHE tool underpinned by programme theory was developed evidenced by midrange theories of change. Analytical themes were developed to explain the programme theory and the complexities of a successful SHE intervention: the need to legitimize children’s sleep problems and consider the nature of customization, knowledge sharing, health expectation and impact of sleep service rationing and gaming strategies on implementation success. Policy and practice implications include a need to raise the public profile of children’s sleep problems and promote parental involvement in intervention implementation. Further research is needed to test out this theory-driven framework for evaluating SHE.
    • Understanding violence when the perpetrator has an intellectual disability: The perceptions of professionals

      Lovell, Andy; Skellern, Joanne; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-12-18)
      Aim: The research sought to enhance professional understanding of the violence perpetrated by some people with an intellectual disability. Background: The violent behaviour exhibited by some people with intellectual disabilities remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to a clear and informative definition. Design: A qualitative study investigating the views and perceptions of professionals working directly with people with an intellectual disability in different settings. Methods: 22 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with professionals from a variety of backgrounds and four themes were generated through data analysis. Findings: Themes produced comprised the degree of intellectual disability, impulsivity, intentionality and unpredictability. Findings indicated tension between understanding violence as purposeful and explaining it in relation to the intellectual disability and/or additional conditions. Conclusion: Intellectual disability is central to understanding the impact of the other three themes, though there is a professional reluctance to use such knowledge as evidence to inform practice.