• Are we preparing student nurses for final practice placement

      Morrell, Nicola; Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (Mark Allen Healthcare Ltd, 2014-05-21)
      The aims of this research were to illuminate student nurses’ perceptions of preparedness for final practice placement, and to ascertain factors that supported and hindered preparation for final placement practice. This phenomenological qualitative research was carried out in a UK higher education institution (HEI) with eight adult branch student nurses maintaining written diaries for the first 4 weeks of their final 10-week practice placement. Data were then analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach (IPA). Results showed that students felt ill-prepared for placement. Eight clear themes emerged, including: being used as ‘an extra pair of hands’; mentors appearing to treat student practice documentation as unimportant; and high staff expectations. Other themes were: mentor importance; students feeling that they lacked knowledge; and students feeling unsupported and stressed. In conclusion, although students felt that they lacked knowledge and were used as an extra pair of hands, they did show clinical competence.
    • Daniel's story: Self-injury and the case study as method

      Lovell, Andy; University of Chester (Mark Allen Publishing, 2006-02-01)
      This journal article explores the value of case study methodology as a means of investigating the relationship between people with learning disabilities and self-injury. One life story might appear to be of limited value in this regard; however, it is argued that it might not only be of use in demonstrating the development of an isolated self-injuring career, but there may also be insights into its entrenchment in the lives of others. The telling of one story might serve as a filter, through which the interventions of medication, mechanical restraint and behaviourism can be observed over time. Furthermore, studying one life in some detail might be used to illustrate broader concerns about the context of the transition from institutional to community care. The restrictions of such an approach are acknowledged, particularly in the telling of a story where the main character's words cannot be heard, but maybe that is also the point of undertaking research about those at the margins of society.
    • Evidence-informed practice: simplifying and applying the concept for nursing students and academics

      Bettany-Saltikov, Josette; Van Schaik, Paul; McSherry, Robert; Kumah, Elizabeth; University of Chester, University of Teesside
      Abstract Background: Nurses’ ability to effectively apply evidence into practice is a critical factor in the delivery of quality patient care. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is recognized as the gold standard for the delivery of safe and effective person-centred care. Yet, after several decades of its inception, nurses continue to encounter difficulties in implementing the concept. Existing models for implementing EBP offer stepwise approaches, nevertheless, certain factors, such as the context of care and its mechanistic nature act as barriers to the effective and consistent implementation of EBP. It is, therefore, imperative that a solution to solving the way in which evidence is applied into practice is found. Evidence-Informed Practice (EIP) is an evolving concept. In recent times, there has been a focus on EIP as an alternative to EBP. This has generated an international debate as to which of the two concepts better facilitate the application of evidence into practice. While several EBP models and educational interventions exist, there is limited research directed towards understanding the concept of EIP and how it facilitates the application of evidence into clinical nursing practice. Aim: This article aims at clarifying the concept of EIP and provides an integrated systems-based model of EIP in facilitating the application of evidence into clinical nursing practice. This is achieved through the application of two nursing case scenarios. Case scenario 1 is about caring for a high-dependent patient and case scenario 2 involves a patient with a low white blood cell count. Method: this article takes the reader through the various factors, elements, and associated systems and processes of the EIP model. Results: The case scenarios detail the various factors and elements of the EIP model and defines how it facilitates the application of evidence into clinical nursing practice. Conclusion: The EIP model provides a framework for nurses (indeed all healthcare practitioners) to deliver clinically effective care, and to be able to defend the processes used and the service provided by referring to reliable evidence. Revised
    • The future of nursing: Career choices in potential student nurses

      Whitehead, Elizabeth; Mason, Tom; Ellis, Jackie; University of Chester (Mark Allen, 2007-04-01)
      Young people leaving schools and sixth-form colleges have the opportunity to choose a career path from an increasing number of courses in colleges of further and higher education. Nursing studies are now competing with a range of health-related disciplines such as health studies, psychology and complementary therapy. Compared with nursing studies, many of these courses appear more exciting and appealing to studnets who are in the process of choosing a career or programme of study. while the increased choice is a positive move for students it may contribute to the shortage of students currently entering some areas of nursing. Indeed, some specialities in nursing, including mental health and learning disabilities, are so depleted in students that they are reaching a point of crisis. There is also concern that recruitment into nursing remains predominantly female and White British. Given the diversity of the UK population and the reliance on school leavers as a potential source of supply, it is important to understand why male students and those from multiracial and multicultural environments choose, or do not choose, nursing studies. This research study involved a sample of 106 16-year old students from three secondary schools in the North-West and South-East of England. The questionnaire results, collected in schools, revealed that students held tradtional views or knew very little about the nursing profession.
    • People with learning disabilities who engage in self-injury

      Lovell, Andy; University College Chester (Mark Allen Publishing, 2004-07-01)
      This journal article represents some of the findings of the author's research into the relationship between self-injury and learning disability. It identifies the key theoretical discourses associated with the phenomenon, before elaborating on the main principles of each and identifying resultant intervention strategies. These interventions, psychotropic medication, mechanical restraint, and the behavioural approach are subsequently described. Case-study methodology was employed since this enabled the examination over time of these intervention strategies in the lives of individuals fulfilling the necessary criteria of persistent self-injury and significant communication difficulties. The findings of the research suggest a frequently piecemeal approach to self-injury, with arbitrary selection of behavioural intervention approaches, a continued reliance on powerful medication, and ambivalence concerning the use of mechanical restraint. Nurses were often skilled in working from a behavioural perspective, but were hindered by complex family circumstances and a failure to gain the confidence of direct care staff. There was also a lack of appreciation about the relationship between the individual and his/her self-injury, and recognition of the nature of the intransigence.
    • Serving within the British army: research into mental health benefits

      Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; McGee, Paula; Srinivasan, Mike; Simpson, Robin; University of Chester (Mark Allen Group, 2011-10-28)
      The mental health (MH) of soldiers remains extremely newsworthy and is regularly featured in high profile media forums that focus on post-traumatic stress disorder. However, the authors feel that there are distinct benefits to serving within the Army, and that it provides effective occupational medical, MH and welfare support. This research study explores potential benefits and stressors of being in the Army and provides an overview of Army mental health services (AMHS) through the perspectives of AMHS personnel, 84% of which were nurses. The study indicated that the Army can provide a protective community, sharing a bond based on common values and experiences. The Army can provide soldiers with career opportunities that are not available in civilian life, and there are opportunities to develop an employment profile, enhanced by internal and external educational training, and encapsulated within a progressive career pathway. The Army can also be seen to offer an escape route, preventing soldiers entering a life of crime, and supplying the stable family these soldiers had never experienced. The provision of leadership, within an environment where soldiers are valued and stigma is not tolerated can potentially shield against MH problems.