• Do health consultations for people with learning disabilities meet expectations? A narrative literature review

      Chapman, Hazel M.; Lovell, Andy; Bramwell, Ros; University of Chester (Wiley, 2018-04-06)
      Aim: To explore the benefits and disadvantages of annual health checks for people with learning disabilities, including: • What are the rationales and outcome measures for health checks? • How well do health checks meet the needs of people with learning disabilities? • What areas does research in this topic need to focus on in the future? Background Health consultations are an interpersonal activity that influence health outcomes and attitudes towards self and health professionals for people with learning disabilities. Annual health checks have been introduced to improve health inequalities for people with learning disabilities Method A narrative literature review of health care for people with learning disabilities was undertaken to evaluate health care for this population, and specifically the outcomes from annual health checks. Findings: While annual health checks have made some improvements in terms of health outcomes, attendance for appointments is still low, provision is variable and experiences of health checks for people with learning disabilities are under-researched. Conclusions: Service-user-led research into their health experiences is needed. Research into the attitudes and experiences of health professionals in relation to people with learning disabilities is needed. Health care inequalities are only being partially addressed – improvement is needed in terms of service user experience and engagement.
    • Experiences of sleep hygiene education as an intervention for sleep problems in children with developmental disabilities: Findings from an exploratory study.

      Sutton, Julie E.; Huws, Jaci C.; Burton, Christopher R.; University of Chester and Bangor University (Wiley, 2019-05-16)
      Behavioural sleep problems in children with developmental disabilities that involves advising parents on sleep‐promoting behaviours; however, it is supported by a limited evidence base. Materials and methods: This exploratory study aimed to enhance qualitative understanding and explore stakeholder perceptions about experience, current practice and ideas around the implementation of SHE. Parents of children with developmental disabilities and sleep problems (N = 9) and sleep practitioners (N = 11) took part in semi‐structured interviews and focus groups, and data were thematically analysed. Results and discussion: The analysis identified four parent themes: Beliefs about sleep problems; Getting professional help; Ways of knowing about sleep; and Visions of sleep support. Two practitioner themes were also identified: Sleep service accessibility and Inconsistent sleep support. Conclusion: The findings provide further insight into how parents of children with developmental disabilities experience sleep problems, and how SHE is currently implemented. These have implications for both policy and practice.
    • Gaining employment: The experience of students at a further education college for individuals with learning disabilities

      Skellern, Joanne; Astbury, Geoff; University of Chester (Wiley, 2012-01-02)
      Employment is widely acknowledged as a key factor to social inclusion, but it is estimated that <7% of people with learning disabilities are in paid employment. It was the aim of the research study to critically examine the experience of gaining employment from the perspectives of students with learning disabilities, parents, education staff and employers. All participants were recruited from one collaborating UK organisation, a college offering further education for young people with learning disabilities. Twenty-three interviews were conducted. Analysis of the data identified three themes surrounding the perceived roles of: Protector, Rescuer and Worker. Recommendations are discussed to improve collaborative working between student, parent, education staff and employer to overcome some of the difficulties influencing employment rates and contribute to the empowerment and inclusion of people with learning disabilities in society.
    • Learning disability against itself: The self-injury/self-harm conundrum

      Lovell, Andy; University of Chester (Wiley, 2007-10-17)
      The article begins with a critical look at the existing literature explaining self-injury by people with significant learning disabilities and self-harm by those with mental health difficulties. It suggests that the different conceptualizations are perhaps less distinct than might initially appear, and that behavioural similarities between those with and those without learning disabilities might be greater than previously believed. The notion of 'career' is presented as a means of explaining the process by which people with learning disabilities engage in self-injury and subsequently integrate it into their lives. Data are subsequently presented from a number of life histories of people with learning disabilities to illustrate the development of self-injury over the life course. The findings of the research indicate that the development and consolidation of self-injury over time conforms to the expectations of a career and provides reason to question the contemporary separate categorization of the behaviour of people with significant learning disabilities. The evidence suggests that the relationship between self-injury and learning disability is best explicable in terms of its intelligibility, rational behaviour in the context of the individual's life.
    • Making sense of complexity: a qualitative investigation into forensic learning disability nurses' interpretation of the contribution of personal history to offending behaviour

      Skellern, Joanne; Lovell, Andrew; University of Chester; University of Derby
      Background: There is growing recognition that an individual’s personal history can be extremely influential in shaping his/her future experience, though there has been limited exploration in the context of learning disability and offending behaviour. Method: Research questions related to participant interpretation of offending behaviour and individual and service responses. A series of focus groups comprising learning disability forensic nurses were conducted across all secure settings, high, medium and low. Results: Three themes were produced: interpreting offending behaviour; the impact of personal history; responding therapeutically. The difficulties relating to understanding the relationship between offending behaviour and personal history significantly informed the construction of the most effective therapeutic relationships. Conclusions: An increased focus on the impact of someone’s background might inform nursing as it seeks to deliver care to individuals with increasingly complex needs in a time of service transition.