• Underlying thinking pattern profiles predict parent-reported distress responses in autism spectrum disorder

      Tollerfield, Isobel; Chapman, Hazel M.; Lovell, Andrew; Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; University of Chester (Springer, 29-05-2021)
      Appreciating autistic neurodiversity is important when supporting autistic people who experience distress. Specifically, use of a profiling model can reveal less visible autistic differences, including strengths and abilities. Binary logistic regressions showed that the likelihood of extreme distress responses could be interpreted based on parent-reported autistic thinking pattern profiles for 140 young people. Perspective-taking (specifically empathy), extreme demand avoidance, and over-sensory sensitivity each contributed to the combined regression models. From the clinical perspective of autism as a multi-dimensional and inter-connected construct, there may be implications for planning support and building positive self-understanding. Individually tailored adjustments and support strategies may be identified more easily after delineating variables found across four core aspects: sensory coherence, flexible thinking, perspective-taking, and regulation. Keywords: Autism; Distress; Profile; Strengths; Thinking patterns.