• Are we preparing student nurses for final practice placement

      Morrell, Nicola; Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (Mark Allen Healthcare Ltd, 2014-05-21)
      The aims of this research were to illuminate student nurses’ perceptions of preparedness for final practice placement, and to ascertain factors that supported and hindered preparation for final placement practice. This phenomenological qualitative research was carried out in a UK higher education institution (HEI) with eight adult branch student nurses maintaining written diaries for the first 4 weeks of their final 10-week practice placement. Data were then analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach (IPA). Results showed that students felt ill-prepared for placement. Eight clear themes emerged, including: being used as ‘an extra pair of hands’; mentors appearing to treat student practice documentation as unimportant; and high staff expectations. Other themes were: mentor importance; students feeling that they lacked knowledge; and students feeling unsupported and stressed. In conclusion, although students felt that they lacked knowledge and were used as an extra pair of hands, they did show clinical competence.
    • Assessment: Physical

      Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (Sage, 2008-03-17)
      This chapter examines the need for effective assessment skills in the nursing profession, and argues that the process of assessment is not a one-off activity and that ongoing assessment of patients is needed in order to identify actual and potential problems along with need to prioritise the need against demands on resources. Further consideration is given to the underpinning philosophy of the process of assessment.
    • Caring for the older person

      Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (SAGE, 2010-10-15)
      This book chapter discusses an older person's palliative care needs.
    • Dignity

      Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (SAGE, 2008-03-17)
      This book chapter discusses the concept of dignity in healthcare.
    • Effectiveness of nitric oxide agents in preventing the early onset of pre-eclampsia and possible modification of metabolic factors in high-risk pregnancies

      Nnate, Daniel; Massey, Alan; Ridgway, Victoria; Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; University of Chester (International prospective register of systematic reviews, 2018-11-28)
      Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-specific condition which affects at least 2 - 8% of pregnancies and is the major cause of foetal growth restriction, small gestational age and increased rate of preterm birth from induced labour and caesarean section. The rate of early-onset of pre-eclampsia raises serious concern; and the most affected population are nulliparous women, women with chronic hypertension, multiple pregnancies and those with chronic diseases. Increasing the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) in the endothelial system through the timely administration of NO agents could minimise the metabolic precursors of pre-eclampsia which may be a cost-effective intervention in preventing the complications related to the ailment. While the effectiveness and safety of suggested interventions for the prevention of pre-eclampsia on maternal and neonatal health is being deliberated, evidence on the role of NO in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia is well recognised. Nitric oxide agents have been proven to be effective in preventing complications from pre-eclampsia; however, there is limited evidence on NO agents in preventing its early onset in high risk pregnancies. Previous studies on pre-eclampsia prevention with NO agents lacks the criteria required to achieve optimum effects; and the benefit of administering NO agents before 20 weeks’ gestation is yet to be established.
    • Elderly Persons Health and Wellbeing

      Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (2019-10-01)
      This chapter considers older persons’ health and wellbeing. As the world population changes there are global challenges to ensure that health and social care systems, individuals, communities and countries meet the needs of older people so that they are empowered to lead active and connected later lives. However, these opportunities are heavily dependent on two fundamental characteristics that of good health and wellbeing and healthy ageing. The conceptualisation of ‘being old or older’ first needs to be considered. The use of 65 as a parameter to measure old age is a political and social construct. Baar et al. (2014) for example noted the tendency to use 60 to 65 as the entrance point to old age and although useful to establish understanding writers in the field of gerontology have argued against such use. Culturally older age can occur from 50 upwards (Baar et al. 2014) as consequence of poor health, education, financial situation and environment and there is no typical older person (World Health Organisation (WHO) 2018a). Other authors have defined no age categorisation boundaries but have referred to a third and fourth age. The third age being conceptualised as a life period full of opportunity and good health and wellbeing, whilst the fourth age is perceived as a period of decline, increasing dependency and ultimately death (Higgs and Gilleard 2015). Therefore, being older is difficult to define and for this chapter 60 will be used as a ‘marker of old age’. There are two lenses from which society view and perceive older people, first by some they are considered a burden, a drain on resources and are less valued. Alternatively, older people are considered wise, dependable individuals who contribute to society, local communities and family life. The increasing older demographic has both immense potential for society but also comes with challenges. This chapter will explore population growth, perceptions of ageing, health and wellbeing in later life, factors that negate against healthy ageing and will end with preventive strategies
    • An evaulation study of a pilot group education programme for inflammatory bowel disease

      Sephton, Mark; Kemp, Karen; Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester; University of Manchester (BMJ Publishing Group, 2015-10-23)
      Background and aims The emphasis for healthcare clinicians to provide adequate diseaserelated education is increasing. Yet little is known about the effect of providing diseaserelated education within inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous studies have demonstrated increased levels of knowledge and satisfaction, but failed to capture any positive effects on the psychosocial elements of living with IBD. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate the impact of providing a group patient education programme on the psychosocial elements of living with IBD. Methods The data were obtained through eight semistructured qualitative interviews. Participants were recruited at the education programme using purposive sampling. All the interviews were digital recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used by two independent researchers to analyse the transcripts and agreed emerging themes. Results A global theme of ‘mastery’ was evident within the transcripts. This was underpinned with two core themes of enablement and cooperative learning. The education programme ‘enabled’ the participants in a variety of ways: increased confidence, control, courage and power over their disease. An unexpected core theme of cooperative learning was also identified, with participants describing the overwhelming benefit of interaction with other people who also had IBD. Conclusions This is the first qualitative study to report on the effects of providing a group patient education within IBD. The results identify new and interesting psychosocial elements that existing quantitative studies have failed to identify.
    • Presenting your writing in different formats

      Ridgway, Victoria; Keeling, June J.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores the following topics: essays, oral presentations/examinations, poster presentation, dissertation structuring and writing, portfolio development and finally writing for publication. With key tips for each, the chapter address these concepts in detail.
    • Social Work Students’ Perceptions of Ageing

      Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2018-06-23)
      Little is understood about social work students or social workers’ perceptions of ageing in the UK. This paper presents a small-scale study of 20 master social work students’ perceptions of ageing during the first year of their programme. A mixed method approach was employed over a two-staged research project, in both stages the social work students were asked to complete Kogan’s (1961) Attitudes Towards Older People Scale (KATOPS) and draw a person aged 75. Results demonstrated that most students had neutral to positive attitudes towards older people at the beginning of the programme and these improved in stage two; all had positive attitudes. The drawings provided a visual narrative of their perceptions of older people, visual signifiers included physical signs of ageing. Fulfilment, emotion, family, individuality and appearance were emergent themes. Whilst the programme enhanced the students’ perceptions more work is needed to dispel the myths and stereotypes about ageing
    • Student and Lecturer Partnership: Using visual research to change and address a practice problem

      Ridgway, Victoria; Cooper, Elizabeth; Parkes, Elanor; University of Chester (Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change, 2017-12-31)
      This paper reports upon a research study which was conducted in partnership between academics and a (then) student, as part of a University internally funded study. This partnership approach was taken to actively engage a student within additional Faculty activities, seeking to enhance student engagement with pedagogical research. The student, a current pre-registration nursing student (Elanor) had undertaken a placement with the Joanna Briggs Institute as part of her educational programme and this project enabled her to further the emerging interest in nursing research. Both academics were studying for doctorates and thus were beginning their research career and used the award of this project to enhance their research awareness and practice. This paper offers a short insight into the journey of the research, from planning, to completion and through to dissemination.
    • Using visual methodology: Social work student's perceptions of practice and the impact on practice educators.

      Bailey-McHale, Julie; Bailey-McHale, Rebecca; Caffrey, Bridget; Macleand, Siobhan; Ridgway, Victoria; University of Chester; Kirwin Maclean Associates (Taylor & Francis, 2018-06-21)
      Practice learning within social work education plays a significant part in students’ educational journey. Little is understood about the emotional climate of placements. This paper presents a small scale qualitative study of 13 social work students’ perceptions of their relationship with a practice educator (PE) and 6 PE’s perceptions of these emotional experiences. Visual methodology was employed over a two-phased research project, first social work students were asked to draw an image of what they thought practice education looked like, phase two used photo eliciation, PEs were then asked to explore the meaning of these images. Results demonstrated that social work students focused on their own professional discourse, the identity of PEs, power relationship and dynamics between themselves and PEs, the disjointed journey and practice education in its entirity. Whilst the PEs shared their personal views of practice education and reflected on this, both groups had a shared understanding of practice education including its values and frustrations. Keywords: social work placements, visual methodology, practice educators
    • Visual perceptions of ageing: A multi method and longitudinal study exploring attitudes of undergraduate nurses towards older people

      Mason-Whitehead, Elizabeth; McIntosh-Scott, Annette; Ridgway, Victoria (University of Chester, 2015-12)
      Ageism and negative attitudes are reported to be institutionally embedded in healthcare. The unprecedented increase in the older population together with social perceptions of later life presents all those involved in the delivery of healthcare with considerable challenges. It was therefore timely to examine attitudes and perceptions of healthcare professionals towards older people. This study presents a critical visual exploration of the perceptions of ageing of undergraduate nursing students at a University in the North of England, based on the findings of a three year longitudinal study. The research employed a pragmatic standpoint where mixed methodology was adopted to explore perceptions and included the use of an attitude towards older people scale (KOP) (Kogan, 1961), visual methods (participants were asked to draw a person aged 75), a Thurstone scale and photo elicitation. The research design and construct was influenced by the epistemology of constructionism and discourse analysis. The research was conducted alongside an undergraduate nursing programme, and followed the natural journey of 310 students from one intake and involved three waves of data collection. The study established that the majority of participants had moderately positive attitudes towards older people the beginning of the programme and that these had improved for a significant number by the end of the study programme. From the quantitative data it was determined that age, gender, educational qualifications, practice learning, branch of nursing and contact with older people influenced the participants’ overall attitude score. The use of visual methods provided a narrative of the participants’ perceptions of later life and appearance dominated the imagery via the physical depiction of ageing and the ascetics of clothing and grooming. The influence of role models was seen to impact upon the production of the image via the depiction of grandparents and people they knew and the drawings identified some older people being active. The visual findings established that the undergraduate nurses in the study viewed older people from a socially constructed phenomenon and used symbols (hairstyle, clothing, mobility aids) to depict old age. The nursing programme was found to positively alter perceptions. The research findings have led to recommendations based on three prominent themes; 1) implications for nurse education and practice, 2) gerontology education and research and 3) future use of the research methods.
    • Visual Perceptions of Ageing; A Longitudinal Mixed Methods Study of UK Undergraduate Student Nurses’ Attitudes and Perceptions Towards Older People.

      Ridgway, Victoria; Mason-Whitehead, Elizabeth; Mcintosh-Scott, Annette; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2018-09-11)
      Ageism and negative attitudes are said to be institutionally embedded in healthcare during a time when there are unprecedented increases in older population numbers. As nurses’ care for older people in a range of environments it was timely to examine attitudes and perceptions of undergraduate nurses towards older people. A longitudinal mixed methods study in conjunction with a three-year undergraduate UK nursing programme 2009-2012 was conducted with 310 undergraduate nurses. A questionnaire incorporating Kogan’s attitude towards older people scale and a drawing of a person aged 75 years was completed three times, once each year. Thurstone scale and photo elicitation were also employed. Comparisons were made between individual participant’s attitude score and drawing. The study established 75% of participants had moderately positive attitudes towards older people when the programme began, at the programme end this had increased to 98%. Age, gender, educational qualifications, practice learning, nursing field and contact with older people influenced participants’ overall attitude score. Drawings provided a visual narrative of participants’ perceptions of older people, appearance was a dominant discourse and the images were socially constructed. The study established the undergraduate nursing programme influenced attitudes and perceptions towards older people and suggests nurse education can influence changing attitudes. To date there is no known study that has advanced this understanding.