• Anxiety, bonding and attachment during pregnancy, the transition to parenthood and psychotherapy

      Steen, Mary; Jones, Alun; Woodworth, Barabara; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; Chester and Wirral Partnership NHS Trust (Mark Allen Publishing, 2013-12-01)
      Although becoming and being a parent are considered happy life events, parents can suffer from varying degrees of anxiety and variable mood. Anxiety and mood changes can be missed and this can lead to mental health problems if not recognised at an early stage. An insecure attachment in a parent's early infanthood can contribute to increased levels of anxiety and emotional problems when becoming and being a parent themselves, which can influence mother and child bonding as well as wider difficulties within family relationships. In many instances, attachment styles can be passed on to the infant causing a range of emotional and intellectual difficulties. In certain circumstances, these parents may benefit from psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is a method of addressing troubling emotions along with life difficulties and relationship struggles. Using psychological methods, a psychotherapist can help a person change his or her life for the better by becoming more effective in work or personal relationships. Local community support and befriending approaches have been shown to be beneficial in alleviating anxiety and depression. This article briefly describes what psychotherapy is and demonstrates ways in which interpersonal attachment styles established early on in life can bring difficulties to adult relationships. Two disguised scenarios referring to actual psychotherapy consultations are included to illustrate how plans can be put in place to address interpersonal difficulties related to attachment styles.
    • The burden of shame and stigma

      Steen, Mary; Jones, Alun; University of Chester (Redactive Publishers: Royal College of Midwives, 2014-03-01)
      It is not only women who experience shame and stigma because of their circumstances, it can affect midwives too. Shame and stigma can have a significant impact on both parents and midwife. Expectant parents who are experiencing difficulties with childbirth may become self absorbed. Critical ruminations are likely to ensue and this can lead to these parents failing to care for themselves appropriately. Meanwhile, midwives’ professional practice may also become compromised because of shameful ruminations.
    • Maternal mental health: Stigma and shame

      Steen, Mary; Jones, Alun; University of Chester ; University of Chester (Medical Education Solutions Ltd, 2013-06-01)
      For some vulnerable women, a major life event such as becoming pregnant can bring out a predisposition to mental illness. Receiving mental health care can invoke stigma and shame in varied and complex ways causing a sense of entrapment.
    • Midwifery and psychological care

      Jones, Alun (Mark Allen Group, 2018-12-02)
    • Safeguarding and qualitative research

      Jones, Alun; Steen, Mary; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2013-01-07)
      Qualitative research is a potent method used by researchers to gain an insight and understanding into the thoughts, feelings, views and experiences of both patient’s and healthcare professionals. The narrative data offered through conversational methods of qualitative research can provide rich and deep descriptions of healthcare and so act as a guide to further research or offer different views and considerations for professional practice. Nonetheless, safeguards are a paramount issue particularly if studies involve inexperienced researchers.