• CPTs’ perceptions of their role satisfaction and levels of professional burnout

      Haydock, Deborah; Mannix, Jean; Gidman, Janice; University of Chester (Community Practitioner, 2011-05-19)
      This paper reports on a multi-method research project that explored perceived role satisfaction and professional burnout among community practice teachers (CPTs) while facilitating postregistration education and caseload management. A bespoke Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Educators) were completed by 23 participants to elicit quantitative and qualitative data. Findings are presented in relation to three themes – aspects of the CPT role leading to satisfaction, aspects leading to dissatisfaction or burnout, and ways to enhance satisfaction and reduce burnout. The majority of CPTs were satisfied with their current role. A number of factors were elicited that affected participants’ perceived satisfaction. Respondents scored low levels of burnout overall, with high levels of personal accomplishment and low levels of depersonalisation. The relationship between participants’ satisfaction and their levels of burnout was not found to be statistically significant. However, mean scores on the emotional exhaustion subscale indicate moderate levels of emotional exhaustion. The paper concludes with recommendations to improve the support provided by employers and partner universities for CPTs.
    • Enhancing practice teachers’ knowledge and skills using collaborative action learning sets

      Haydock, Deborah; Evers, Jean; University of Chester (Community Practitioner, 2014-06-23)
      This research project was designed to enhance the critical thinking and problem-solving skills of practice teachers (PTs) and promote role modelling to specialist community public health nursing (SCPHN) students. This paper explores the impact of action learning sets (ALS) on the trainee PT role and associated students and stakeholders. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed by eight trainee PTs and three focus groups were held consisting of trainee PTs, practice education facilitators and students. Three focus groups for the trainee PTs, practice education facilitators and allocated students were held. Findings are presented in relation to three themes: knowledge, skills and role modelling in practice; dedicated practice teacher development; and ALS in practice. Data analysis demonstrated that the PTs valued the dedicated module and ALS enhanced their knowledge and skills. These skills were role modelled to students to guide reflection and knowledge acquisition. All participants intended to develop ALS as part of continued professional development. The paper concludes with recommendations to improve the educational development of both trainee and experienced PTs through the integration of ALS as part of PT development.
    • Utilising a Bourdieusian lens to explore emerging health visitor practice education experiences within the context of the Health Visitor Implementation Plan

      Gidman, Jan; Taylor, Lou; Haydock, Deborah (University of Chester, 2019-05-14)
      The Health Visitor Implementation Plan (HVIP) (DH, 2011a) changed the recruitment criteria for health visiting and the way health visitor (HV) practice placements were supported. Several universities offered accelerated '2+1' programmes, where a graduate with a health related degree obtained accreditation of prior learning and completed pre-registration nurse training in two rather than three years. This was then followed by a one-year post-registration Health Visitor programme. This widening of recruitment afforded a unique opportunity to explore the experiences of 2+1 HV students, practice teachers (PTs) and mentors, and emerging practice education models within the context of the HVIP. Findings are considered through the lens of Bourdieu’s theory of practice. The study adopted an interpretive phenomenological design to gain a deeper understanding of the experiences of students, PTs and mentors. In-depth semistructured conversational interviews were undertaken with four HV 2+1 students, two PTs and two mentors. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Findings viewed through a Bourdieusian lens indicate that policy change in the form of the HVIP affected the structure of the social field, resulting in a period of transition when some participants had difficulty adapting to the changed social context. Long arm models of practice education added to the complexity of the PT role, including the additional responsibility of overseeing numerous students and mentors. Mentors reported feeling under pressure, exacerbated by working in inexperienced teams; and frustration that their contribution to the HVIP was disregarded, compounded by a lack of opportunity for professional progression. Students undertaking different routes into nursing are affected by extrinsic views and this affects evolving habitus and enculturation. When students’ prior experience is valued, this strengthens the students’ perception of their ‘field’ position. Placement changes, particularly during consolidation, can be detrimental as they affect habitus formation and student learning and impact upon assessment processes. The research offers new insights into health visiting practice education and the impact of policy change on practice settings. The findings have implications outside health visiting in the current context of changes to nurse education and the introduction of the new NMC (2018b) standards for student supervision and assessment. New knowledge is offered with regards to the significance of transition periods, changing roles, and the potential impact upon the provision of student practice placements and those who support them. Recommendations are made for further areas of research, practice placement providers and HEIs.