• Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Edition Part 1 - The first 20 years of Lapidus

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-31)
      Welcome to Part 1 of The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – this is the first of a three Part Special Edition with the theme, Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing. This Part collates alternative accounts and reflections particularly from our stimulating Lapidus Day 2016 celebration...
    • Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Edition Part 2 - Collectives Connecting to a Collective Spirit

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-01)
      Welcome to Part 2 of The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – this is the second of a three Part Special Edition with the theme, Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing. This Part focuses on writing practices which enable multiple people to connect with each other or to other things in some way, and in doing so, create new meanings, understandings, or relationships with something, including themselves...
    • Lapidus Journal 20th Anniversary Special Edition Part 3 - Individuals Connecting to a Collective Spirit

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Lapidus: The Writing for Wellbeing Organisation, 2016-08-01)
      Welcome to Part 3 of The Lapidus 20th Anniversary Special Triple Edition – this is the final part of a Special Edition with the theme of Capturing the Collective and Connected Spirit of Writing for Wellbeing. This Part focuses on individually focused individually oriented writing practices which create new meanings, understandings, or relationships with something, including themselves...
    • Launching the creative practices for wellbeing framework: an international Q&A

      Wall, Tony; Sidsaph, Henry; University of Chester
      This article is an edited transcript from the launch event of the Creative Practices for Wellbeing Framework in 2020 (Wall and Axtell, 2020). The guidance is now free to download in 20 languages through these web links here, including in English, Welsh, Chinese, and Russian).
    • Leadership and management: The challenge of performance

      Rowland, Caroline A.; University of Chester (Kogan Page, 2016-03-03)
      The challenges of both leading and managing people and getting results.
    • Leadership development for managers in turbulent times

      Hall, Roger D.; Rowland, Caroline A.; Hall Consultancy; University of Chester (Emerald, 2016-09-12)
      Purpose In a turbulent economic climate, characterised by pressures to improve productivity and reduce costs, leadership and performance management have a more central role in helping to ensure competitive advantage. This paper explores current demands on leaders; and endeavours to explore linkages between management education and agile leadership Design/methodology/approach Taking a grounded theory approach, this paper uses the concepts of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity (VUCA) to investigate the impact on desired attributes of leaders and the extent to which this is underpinned by current management education programmes. It draws on the VUCA model of agile management to examine current practices and experiences and considers future trends. Empirical research includes case studies and analysis of management syllabuses. Findings Syllabuses do not reflect the attributes that organizations expect leaders to possess and are content driven rather than process focussed. VUCA is not yet mainstream in academic thinking. Practical implications There is a disparity between the output of Business Schools and the expectations of organizations. This may affect productivity. It is suggested that the use of live consultancies may provide a more beneficial management development experience. Originality/value This research opens an international debate that seeks to assess the relevance of current management education to the needs of organizations for agile, high performing leaders
    • Learning through work-based learning

      Major, David; University of Chester (Routledge, 2005-03-17)
      This book chapter discusses the understanding that work-based learners have of the learning process, commenting on empirical research findings from Alverno College (US) and University College Chester (UK)
    • Learning to be an international work-based learner

      Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; University of Chester ; Deakin University Australia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-05-01)
      This book chapter discusses key success factors for work-based learning students across cultures. the importance of learning another way to think, write and act to be a successful work-based learning student in a multi-cultural context, how to build a personal learning network and wider environment, ways to continually improve your academic performance through self-reflection and self-leadership, and methods for planning and managing cultural factors when designing and implementing work-based learning projects.
    • Lifelong learning: Concepts, benefits and barriers

      Panitsides, Eugenia A.; Talbot, Jon; Hellenic Open University, University of Chester (NOVA Publishers, 2016-04-21)
      The book reviews contemporary developments in lifelong learning in the context of globalisation
    • Lobbying in Europe: Public Affairs and the Lobbying Industry in 28 EU Countries

      Bitonti, A.; Harris, Phil; IES Abroad Rome and University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-03-01)
      For those studying or working in the field of Public Affairs, in the wide area that connects politics, law, business and communication, Europe represents a fascinating challenge. The European continent provides an incredibly rich picture of political cultures, of institutional frameworks, of governmental styles, of different social, economic and historical traditions, which make up probably the most complex and variegated scenario we may find in the whole world. Even limiting our view to the twenty-eight European Union member states, and considering the unprecedented effort of convergence between different political and legal systems represented today by the EU and by an on-going integration process, we are in front of the most multifaceted Public Affairs arena on the planet, with a composite frame of political systems, a multi-level governance, a population of more than half a billion people speaking at least twenty-four different languages, and one of the most competitive and developed markets, representing around 25% of world GDP. To be able to comprehend how Public Affairs work in such a complex and unique environment can bring us to comprehend a lot about both the industry of Public Affairs in itself and that particular environment as well. That is why, in conceiving this volume, we chose to focus on Europe and on Public Affairs. We decided to narrow our perspective to the EU countries, for a twofold reason. Firstly, we needed a clear and objective criterion to select the cases to analyse and so decide what countries to include in our overview, and EU membership appeared a sufficiently good and definite one, leading us to twenty-eight different case studies (plus the one on the supranational environment of “Brussels bubble”): a size which certainly can be considered rather large in terms of empirical data collected, and – filling an existing gap in the existing literature on the subject – for the first time covering the whole range of national cases within the European Union itself. Secondly, unlike other European countries which are not members of the EU (in 2016 at least), such as Switzerland, Norway or Ukraine, all EU member states have witnessed a convergence and the development of common frameworks of values and institutional designs, due to the influence of the integration process and the shared belonging to a political union, thus allowing common references to be found and making some comparisons easier for an observer. We also chose a field, that of Public Affairs and lobbying, which is meaningful for a number of reasons. Study lobbying in order to study democracy What is democracy today? The world became too complex, trade unions and industry associations no longer enough Multiplicity of interests and policy networks Neo-corporatism, elitism and pluralism in political science History of lobbying (Phil?) Definition of lobbying, theoretical problems “the word lobbying has seldom been used the same way twice by those studying the topic” (Baumgartner and Leech 1998, 33) (Beyers, Eisin and Maloney 2008)
    • L’avenir du management et l’interculturalité: Vers un renouveau des recherches et des productions en GRH

      Plane, Jean-Michel; Stokes, Peter; Brown, Tim; Montpellier University ; University of Chester ; University of Chester (Cairn Info, 2014-10)
    • Machiavelli at 550 — Reflections on his contribution to management, marketing, and public affairs

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester
      With the U.K. Elections upon us and manoeuvring for the U.S. Presidential Elections in November 2020 already started, it is time to reflect on power. It is always good to call upon Machiavelli to help make sense of the issues and people in the political arena. It is 550 years since Niccolo Machiavelli was born in Florence in 1469 of a very old Tuscan family. The young Machiavelli had a vigorous humanist education, was taught Latin by good teachers, and had access to the best of classical history and ideas. Little is known about the rest of his life until at the surprisingly young age of 29 in 1498, he was recognised by the Signory for his administrative talents and was elected to the responsible post of Chancellor of the Second Chancery. He is also given duties in the Council of the Ten of Liberty and Peace (formerly Ten of War), which dealt with Florentine foreign affairs.
    • Madoff’s Ponzi Investment Fraud: A Social Capital Analysis

      Manning, Paul; University of Chester (Emerald, 2017-05-08)
      Purpose: The social network analysis of criminal networks at both the ego and socio-centric level is well established. This purpose of this study is to expand this literature with a social capital analysis of a criminal network. The focus of the analysis will be the recent egregious investment fraud of Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities (BLMIS). Design/methodology/approach: This research involves a case study of the BLMIS financial fraud. The article uses a social capital theoretical lens, with archival sources taken from the court records of Madoff v. NY to include victim impact statements and the defendant’s Plea Allocution. Findings: Financial crime literature can be expanded with a social capital analysis which facilitates a socio-economic analysis of ego-centric criminal networks. Research limitations/implications: Each financial crime is of its time; however, there are recurring socio-economic network characteristics that could be applied to develop an understanding of criminal networks. Practical implications: Any understanding of financial crime, including contemporary instances of criminal innovation, such as cyber-crime, can be enhanced with a social capital analysis of criminal networks. Originality/value: A social capital analysis of financial crime draws attention to “human factors” in criminal networks that are integral to this form of crime.
    • Make Your Learning Count: Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

      Perrin, David; Helyer, Ruth; University of Chester; Teesside University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-05-01)
      In this chapter readers will learn: ► What the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is; ► How to use the Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process to make a claim for academic credit; ► How to include any certificated and experiential learning in an APL claim; ► How to scope out strengths and expertise as ‘Areas of Learning’ you can claim for; ► How to make and submit an APL claim with appropriate supporting evidence.
    • Making employer and university partnerships work: Accredited employer-led learning

      Dhillon, Bop; Edmonds, Therese; Felce, Alison; Minton, Ann; Wall, Tony; EBTA Service ; E H Booth & Co Ltd ; University of Wolverhampton ; University of Derby ; University of Chester (Libri Publishing, 2011-11-01)
    • Making Great Minds Think Alike: Emerging market multinational firms’ leadership effects on targets’ employee psychological safety after cross-border mergers and acquisitions

      Rao-Nicholson, Rekha; Khan, Zaheer; Stokes, Peter; University of the West of England; University of Sheffield; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2015-10-09)
      Abstract This paper examines the impact of leadership on targets’ employee psychological safety (EPS), characterized by employees’ expectation of job and remuneration stability, during the cross-border mergers and acquisitions (M&As) by emerging market multinational companies (EMNEs). The M&As by Indian and Chinese companies forms the empirical context of this study and the case survey method is used to examine the effect of leadership on EPS. The results show that the EMNEs’ leadership visibility during the M&A process has no impact on the EPS, whereas, the trust in the EMNEs’ leadership has positive effect on the EPS. The deal status has a moderating effect on the leadership visibility and positively affects the EPS. This research finds evidence of target country differences in terms of the effect of EMNEs’ leadership on EPS and limited evidence of such effect for acquirer nationality differences. Keywords: employee psychological safety, leadership, Emerging market multinational firms, M&As, India, China 
    • Making your learning count: How APL can enhance your profile

      Evans, Adrian; Perrin, David; Helyer, Ruth; Hooker, Elaine; Teeside University : University of Chester : Teeside University : Teeside University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010-07-16)
      This book chapter discusses what APL (accreditation of prior learning) is, how it works, and how to make a claim for APL.
    • Management

      Moss, Danny; University of Chester (Wiley, Blackwell, 2017-08-10)
      Chapter on the theme of " Management" in The International Encyclopedia of Strategic Communication
    • Management Learning, Performance and Reward; Theory and Practice Revisited

      Rowland, Caroline A.; Hall, Roger D.; University of Chester (Emerald Publishing, 2014-11)
      Purpose: This paper explores the extent to which organizational learning is recognised through performance management systems as contributing to organizational effectiveness and competitive advantage. Methodology: It reviews several pieces of research, employing a wide range of methods, including: content analysis of managers’ reflections; questionnaires completed by managers and mentors; a large scale survey involving ethnography, interviews and questionnaires and; analysis of documents from professional bodies and management delivery centres. Findings: Genuine integration of individual and organizational goals or transfer of learning from the individual to the organization is not evident. Few qualitative measures of organizational performance are employed. The impact of metrics such as IiP or EFQM on organizational effectiveness is nor discernible. Management Learning and Development is rarely measured even when it is encouraged by the organization. There is a clear divide between research, teaching and learning and, workplace practice. Performance management systems create perceptions of unreliability and inequity. Research implications: Espousing the value of learning and learning to learn, measuring them accurately and rewarding them with meaningful changes to working life can only improve organizational effectiveness. Research into the few organizations that have successfully embraced triple loop learning in their development of managers may offer a template for transformational learning to sustain competitive advantage. Originality: Management Development processes have been successful in developing individuals but less successful in achieving organizational development. This paper offers new insights into that gap and the omissions in the metrics by which performance is measured. Keywords: management learning, performance, reward, triple loop Article Classification: Viewpoint
    • The management of continuing professional development in General Further Education Colleges when intentionally aiming to improve Ofsted inspection from an ‘inadequate’ or ‘requires improvement’ grading to ‘good’.

      Flanda, Wilfrid, T (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2018-09)
      The area of teachers’ continuing professional development (CPD) is in the spotlight. This study considers the range of CPD opportunities that are implemented for teachers in General Further Education Colleges (GFECs) following an “inadequate” or “requires improvement” Ofsted inspection in order to achieve a future grading of “good”. The study draws on specific theoretical insights from the literature concerned with teacher professional development in the Further Education (FE) sector. In doing so, the study evaluates the spectrum of CPD models that were on offer within eleven GFECs that took part in the study by using a constant comparative approach. Using data generated from the eleven GFECs and also Kennedy’s (2014b) framework of CPD models as a lens for analysis, I identified five CPD models, which I then classified in relation to their top-down or developmental approach, and also the extent to which the activities identified underpinned professional autonomy and transformative practice. Using CPD as the point of analysis, the study investigates eleven GFECs, and whether the approach taken by the various colleges, prioritises individual or collective development. It then goes on to examine the contribution of resources, roles and responsibilities of individuals and teams within the particular context in which they operated. The findings generated from this study argue that continuous improvement is the result of a change in culture that is initiated by the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and middle managers, and the success of this cultural change hinges on a series of mechanisms that support the achievement of “higher standards” in teaching and learning.