• Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2016-02-02)
      Editorial We are now in the year of the Monkey, a year of excitement and innovation. Monkey years are often dramatic and see large-scale political change, and if you believe these things, it is predicted that we may see much political change and the forging of new alliances. Given the instability, we are seeing in the Middle East and large parts of Africa. Suspect that this is not a predication but a good probability. It is also over 700 years since Marco Polo started traveling eastwards and commented on Chinese and Indian civilizations and observed and recorded the vast amount of trade that was evident in Asia and moved along the Silk Road. He remarked that a stable system of government made this all work for the benefit of each society and that war invariably led to human suffering and mass migration and destruction. Little has changed except that the size of the Asian economies has become larger and the impact of war and conflict more psychologically impactful because of modern media, but the devastation on human life as tragic as ever. This is a general issue and reflects the vibrancy and range of material and research in the public affairs area. Researchers and practitioners represent the EU, Europe, North America, and Asia. We still have gaps in our knowledge geographically, particularly in understanding public affairs in China, India, Japan, and Korea; there has only been limited work on. The first
    • To Exit or Not To Exit: That is the Question: To Build or Retreat: That is another Question

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2016-08-11)
      Editorial. It has been a very interesting and tragic period for Europe over the last month. The UK voted to leave the EU in its Referendum, Its Prime Minister resigned and Teresa May has taken over as the Second female Conservative Prime Minister and formed a new government. The UK Economy took an initial battering in world markets but seems to have settled down now as global players perceive there are advantages and disadvantages for the UK in being in the EU, but the main thing is stability in global markets. It will also speed-up reform of the EU and its institutions, so this may be advantageous. We have also seen a sharp increase in horrific terror atrocities in Europe, notably France, Belgium and Germany which has pointed to the need for more effective management of our freedoms and security of our citizens. It has been a difficult Summer for Europe. We hope and pray that stability and safety will return as without that society will not be based on a balanced platform to provide for all We are also seeing the emergence of the two contenders for the US Presidency, Donald Trump versus Hilary Clinton. The non-establishment business candidate versus the female long serving politician and social reformer. Cleveland and Philadelphia have all given us insights into what is coming. In addition we will soon have elections in Germany and France, which could see major change, whilst growth in South East Asia continues steadily which can be seen in the positive meeting in Ulan Bator at the 11th ASEM Summit. World regulation and development now seems to be very much to the fore as we build and develop a truly global international economy accountable governmental and financial system, accountability, good governance and transparency will be the core underpinnings of that development This is a general issue of the Journal of Public Affairs