• The War to End All Wars: Reflections on the First World War and Public Affairs

      Harris, Phil; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-02-03)
      Editorial As I write this many of us are reflecting upon the outbreak and impact of the First World War on Europe and the World. It was declared during the Summer of 1914 in Europe, when much decision making was limited due to leaders being on holiday and was almost inevitable as some have argued, as the trains had been booked and troops were mobilised. Clearly political communications were not good and European Continental Entente fell apart under the pressures of ambition, greed, nationalism, a lack of trust and public affairs systems not being in place to build cooperation and stop mass destruction. As Margot Asquith the wife of the British Prime minister put it “War! War! – everyone at dinner discussing how long the war would last. The average opinion was 3 weeks to 3 months” (24th July 1914, Page 4 in Brock and Brock, 2014). Of course others, Kitchener, amongst them said it would be a year. It was not a short war but a long one, that lasted for over four years and sucked in every part of the world and destroyed a generation of youth and leaders, which Europe has taken almost a hundred years to fully recover from. Let us reflect, draw lessons and do all in our power to ensure it is never contemplated again and that political decision making and public affairs is never as in inadequate again The themes within this general issue of the JPA focus on climate change, corruption, environmental policy, lobbying, political marketing, public affairs, renewable energy and water policy. A range of critical areas of study and operation both for the modern researcher and practitioner in international public affairs. Countries covered include Belgium, Eire, Switzerland, UK, US and of course organisationally interesting in trade and regulation terms the WTO. Followed by various articles