• A transcultural dance: Enriching work-based learning facilitation

      Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; University of Chester ; Deakin University Australia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-10)
      This book chapter discusses what it might mean being an international work-based learner, the vibrant array of different perspectives work-based learners offer, a pedagogic model for work-based learning contexts, strategies for integrating diverse examples and cases which connect to and validate diverse experiences and prior knowledge, and accommodate diverse work-based learner needs, and strategies which enable and sustain a learning environment across cultural boundaries conducive to work-based learning success.
    • Exploring the power of high-level postgraduate international partnership work based learning programmes

      Weston, Philippa; Perrin, David; Meakin, Denise; CWRS, University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-05-25)
      This chapter explores students’ reflections of their experiential learning whilst enrolled on an HE work based learning (WBL) international internship programme jointly developed by the University of Chester and the Mountbatten Institute. The chapter commences with some background to help set in context why these two organisations came together to form this unique inter-organisational partnership involving the partner delivering and assessing, and the HEI accrediting the programme. Then using data gained from student evaluations together with quotes obtained from students’ reflective learning logs, submitted as part of their final project at the end of the taught element of the programme, the chapter explores students’ perceptions of what they perceive they have gained from this experience which they can take forward into their future careers. As such it provides a unique insight into the nature and value of this international learning experience.
    • Internal Knowledge Transfer: Professional Development Programmes and Embedding Real World Learning for Full-Time Undergraduates

      Perrin, David; Hancock, Connie; Miller, Ruth; University of Chester; Middlesex University
      Perrin, Hancock and Miller provide a discussion of the distinctive features of negotiated work-based learning frameworks that help capture and develop learning for part-time students who are professional practitioners. They demonstrate how approaches to teaching, learning and assessment established in these frameworks can also be leveraged for programmes aimed at full-time undergraduate students wishing to engage with ‘real world’ learning. In this way, full-time students are able to develop the type of professional practice outlooks and skills redolent of part-time students already in employment. The chapter includes two case studies of where this has occurred in UK universities and the methods that were used for this type of internal knowledge transfer.
    • Learning to be an international work-based learner

      Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; University of Chester ; Deakin University Australia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-05-01)
      This book chapter discusses key success factors for work-based learning students across cultures. the importance of learning another way to think, write and act to be a successful work-based learning student in a multi-cultural context, how to build a personal learning network and wider environment, ways to continually improve your academic performance through self-reflection and self-leadership, and methods for planning and managing cultural factors when designing and implementing work-based learning projects.
    • Lobbying in Europe: Public Affairs and the Lobbying Industry in 28 EU Countries

      Bitonti, A.; Harris, Phil; IES Abroad Rome and University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-03-01)
      For those studying or working in the field of Public Affairs, in the wide area that connects politics, law, business and communication, Europe represents a fascinating challenge. The European continent provides an incredibly rich picture of political cultures, of institutional frameworks, of governmental styles, of different social, economic and historical traditions, which make up probably the most complex and variegated scenario we may find in the whole world. Even limiting our view to the twenty-eight European Union member states, and considering the unprecedented effort of convergence between different political and legal systems represented today by the EU and by an on-going integration process, we are in front of the most multifaceted Public Affairs arena on the planet, with a composite frame of political systems, a multi-level governance, a population of more than half a billion people speaking at least twenty-four different languages, and one of the most competitive and developed markets, representing around 25% of world GDP. To be able to comprehend how Public Affairs work in such a complex and unique environment can bring us to comprehend a lot about both the industry of Public Affairs in itself and that particular environment as well. That is why, in conceiving this volume, we chose to focus on Europe and on Public Affairs. We decided to narrow our perspective to the EU countries, for a twofold reason. Firstly, we needed a clear and objective criterion to select the cases to analyse and so decide what countries to include in our overview, and EU membership appeared a sufficiently good and definite one, leading us to twenty-eight different case studies (plus the one on the supranational environment of “Brussels bubble”): a size which certainly can be considered rather large in terms of empirical data collected, and – filling an existing gap in the existing literature on the subject – for the first time covering the whole range of national cases within the European Union itself. Secondly, unlike other European countries which are not members of the EU (in 2016 at least), such as Switzerland, Norway or Ukraine, all EU member states have witnessed a convergence and the development of common frameworks of values and institutional designs, due to the influence of the integration process and the shared belonging to a political union, thus allowing common references to be found and making some comparisons easier for an observer. We also chose a field, that of Public Affairs and lobbying, which is meaningful for a number of reasons. Study lobbying in order to study democracy What is democracy today? The world became too complex, trade unions and industry associations no longer enough Multiplicity of interests and policy networks Neo-corporatism, elitism and pluralism in political science History of lobbying (Phil?) Definition of lobbying, theoretical problems “the word lobbying has seldom been used the same way twice by those studying the topic” (Baumgartner and Leech 1998, 33) (Beyers, Eisin and Maloney 2008)
    • Make Your Learning Count: Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

      Perrin, David; Helyer, Ruth; University of Chester; Teesside University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-05-01)
      In this chapter readers will learn: ► What the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is; ► How to use the Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process to make a claim for academic credit; ► How to include any certificated and experiential learning in an APL claim; ► How to scope out strengths and expertise as ‘Areas of Learning’ you can claim for; ► How to make and submit an APL claim with appropriate supporting evidence.
    • Making your learning count: How APL can enhance your profile

      Evans, Adrian; Perrin, David; Helyer, Ruth; Hooker, Elaine; Teeside University : University of Chester : Teeside University : Teeside University (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010-07-16)
      This book chapter discusses what APL (accreditation of prior learning) is, how it works, and how to make a claim for APL.
    • Research methods

      Wall, Tony; Stokes, Peter; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014-12-05)
      This book explains what is required for carrying out a successful research project. Clear and well-structured, it allows students to quickly grasp key concepts in research methodology, taking them through the various stages of developing a dissertation in a step-by-step guide.
    • Soft Power and International Political Marketing

      Sun, Henry; harris, Phil; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-06-28)
      Joseph Nye defines soft power as the ability of “getting others to want the outcomes that you want” through persuasion and attraction of one’s ideas or the ability to set the political agenda to shape the preferences of others. Nye further argues that in the international arena, besides the military and economic power, there is a third dimension which is characterized as indirect power, cooptive power, and intangible power in contrary to direct power, coercive power, and tangible power. Nye states, “The ability to establish references tends to be associated with intangible power resources such as culture, ideology and institutions. This dimension can be thought of as soft power, in contrast to the hard command power usually associated with tangible resources like military and economic strength.” Henry Sun defines international political marketing as following: International Political Marketing seeks to establish, maintain and enhance long-term relations among nation-states, political actors and organizations, so that the objectives of stakeholders involved are met. This is done by mutual exchange and fulfillment of promises through cross-border and cross-culture marketing strategy and management
    • Turning practitioners into practitioner researchers

      Wall, Tony; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-10)
      This book chapter discusses practitioner research.