• Perceived unfairness in appraisal: Engagement and sustainable organizational performance

      Rowland, Caroline A.; Hall, Roger D.; University of Chester; Hall Consultancy, Manchester (EuroMed Journal of Business, 2013-09-13)
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the contribution of appraisal systems to sustainable organizational effectiveness. It argues that competitive advantage is increasingly reliant on discretionary effort. As the emphasis of appraisal has shifted from a developmental to a performance focus, perceived unfairness in both procedures and outcomes threatens to undermine commitment and, therefore, sustainable performance. Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on a range of theoretical frameworks, current practices and experiences are examined and future trends considered. Empirical research includes a ten-year study of practising managers and ethnography, questionnaires and interviews in two large organizations. Findings – Appraisal frequently creates actual and perceived injustice in terms of both procedures and rewards. It also generates tensions between managing performance and encouraging engagement. Research limitations/implications – This study indicates that further research in other sectors will contribute to the development of greater understanding of sustainable strategic approaches to HRM. Practical implications – Emphasis on performance in appraisal devalues developmental aspects and sometimes affects employee well-being. Separation of the two through mentorship schemes may help to address the paradox, whereby the performance management element of appraisal undermines rather than enhances organizational effectiveness. Originality/value – The conventional wisdom of the appraisal culture is challenged. We argue it is essential to expand the discourse between performance, justice and ethical value systems if sustainable competitive advantage and well-being are to be achieved.
    • Sustainable and responsible business: Focal cases, sectors and contexts

      Stokes, Peter; Moore, Neil; Brooks, Simon; Caulfield, Paul; Wells, Jessica; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; Swansea University ; Nottingham University (Emerald, 2013-09-13)
      This guest editorial for EuroMed Journal of Business discusses sustainable and .responsible business and management
    • Training and development: challenges of strategy and managing performance in Jordanian banking

      Rowland, Caroline A.; Hall, Roger D.; Altarawneh, Ikhlas; University of Chester; Hall Consultancy; Al-Hussein Bin Talal University (Emerald, 2017-05-02)
      Structured Abstract: Purpose: This paper explores the relationship between organisational strategy, performance management and training and development in the context of the Jordanian banking sector. Design and methodology: Models of strategic human resource management developed in the West are considered for their relevance in Jordan. A mixed methods approach is adopted employing interviews with senior managers and training and development managers, employee questionnaires and documentary analysis. It examines all banks in Jordan including foreign and Islamic banks. Findings: Findings indicate that training and development is not driven by human resource strategy and that it is reactive rather than proactive. Training and development does improve skills, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours but there is little evidence that it increases commitment and satisfaction nor that it contributes to strategic aims in any significant way. The linkages between strategy and training and development are not explicit and strategies are not interpreted through performance management systems. Consequently there is a lack of integration in organisational HR systems and the measurable contribution of training and development to competitive advantage is minimal Practical implications: The paper offers suggestions as to how greater integration between strategy, performance management and training and development might be achieved in the Jordanian context. Originality: This paper is the first detailed empirical study of training and development in Jordan to include considerations of transferability of western models to an Arab culture.