Now showing items 1-20 of 304

    • An Analytical Methodology for the Investigation of the Relationship of Music and Lyrics in Popular Music

      Sproston, Darren; Dee, Alex (University of Chester, 2021-03)
      This thesis details the conception and design of a new methodology for examining pop songs holistically; considering both music and lyrics and examining the synergies between the two. Central to this methodology is the application of a data extraction framework, which has been designed to mine information about musical and lyrical phenomena. This framework operates as a common source for producing data about two very different media, avoiding individual interpretation where this is possible. The methodology has been designed to address specific questions about the relationship between music and lyrics, but the main purpose of the thesis is to evaluate the usefulness of the endeavour. In order to examine the efficacy of this approach, the framework was used to populate a dataset made up of a sample of 300 songs, which was subsequently explored and analysed through a series of case studies which investigate combinations of metrics concerned with music and lyrics for the whole sample, as well as analysis of specific subsets defined by a range of parameters. These case studies have demonstrated the various ways this approach might be used, as well as working as proof of concept. The conclusion of the thesis reviews the various case studies in the context of presenting potential uses of the framework as a tool and the broader methodology by other scholars. There is also a consideration of how the overall data might be affected by the inclusion of genres and styles that are not included in the initial sample set.
    • A Practice-Based Approach to Defining Maximalism

      Liggett, Susan; Osanlou, Ardeshir; Jones, Paul; Pioaru, Ioana (University of ChesterWrexham Glyndwr University, 2021-02)
      This practice-based Ph.D. is an exploration of the concept of maximalism in the field of visual arts. Previous studies of maximalism in disciplines such as literature and architecture signalled a lack of rigor surrounding the use of the term maximalism with regard to various cultural productions. In addition, the relative scarcity of works addressing maximalism in visual art drove the development of this research, which aims to clarify the definition of maximalism through the practice of art. Through critical interrogation, the body of work developed within this project revealed insights into the nature of artistic maximalism. During the development of the project, a methodological research gap was identified as the absence of a set of procedures enabling the understanding and use of the concept of maximalism. To address this methodological gap, a theoretical framework describing maximalism in terms of formal parameters was constructed. Maximalism was investigated through the exploration of a variety of new and traditional media: holography, virtual reality (VR) artmaking, 3D printing, printmaking and drawing. The study revealed the intrinsically maximalist nature of holography in conjunction with VR artmaking. VR holography, a new art form resulting from this research, expands physical space by using a flat surface to render potentially infinite 3D content. It also connects the realms of the virtual and the real. Other forms of artistic maximalism revealed by this study include: the expansion of the space of art through para-artistic devices, intensity maximalism explored through miniature drawing, chromatic maximalism, durational maximalism and narrative maximalism. Maximalism as an artistic practice reflects an engagement of the artist in a continual process of becoming, as a method to access and explore new tools for artistic expression. The main contribution of the research is a twofold definition of maximalism. On the one hand, maximalism is defined as a mode of artistic expression intrinsic to the artwork, a definition which lends itself to a type of art analysis partially grounded in formalism. On the other hand, maximalism is proposed as a characteristic of the process of artmaking, referring to a strategy which the artist employs as a means of decentralising the artistic self. Investigating these forms of maximalism showed the potential usefulness, to art theory and criticism, of a theory of maximalism based on aesthetic formalism. The clarification of the concept of maximalism constitutes a contribution to the vocabulary and discourse of art.
    • Conflicting professional identities for artists in transprofessional contexts

      Lehikoinen, Kai; Pässilä, Anne; Owens, Allan; University of the Arts; LUT University; University of Chester (Routledge, 2021-07-02)
      This chapter investigates how the artists navigate multiple and at times conflicting identities within the challenges of working in unfamiliar transprofessional contexts. It also investigates the expanding professionalism of artists in the transprofessional realm of artistic interventions in organisations. Ariane Berthoin Antal argues that artists’ professional identities and also responsibilities are geared towards some fundamental values in the arts, and that it is vital for artists to maintain such values as they collaborate with other professions. To exemplify expanded work in transprofessional contexts, our attention now turns to the experiences of four artists—a theatre director, a performance artist, a dancer, and a dramaturg—who took part in the pilot programme at Uniarts. It is imperative in higher arts education to discuss critically the relationship between professionalism in more traditional artistic practice and the expanding professionalism of hybrid artists in new transprofessional domains.
    • Key Terms in Comics Studies: 22 Entries and Cover

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester
      22 entries in the book 'Key Terms in Comics Studies', plus cover image.
    • Introduction: Key Terms in Comics Studies

      Grennan, Simon; La Cour, Erin; Spanjers, Rik; Free University Amsterdam; University of Chester; Utrecht University
      Introduction to the book 'Key Terms in Comics Studies'. Includes key terms and critical concepts that are used in specific ways in current Anglophone comics studies. Each entry is substantiated with examples of uses and references to uses, as well as other explanations and commentaries on the term or concept. The book contains over 300 terms by almost 100 contributors.
    • From Rugby League to Marriage Intrigue

      Sproston, Darren; University of Chester
      This paper traces the creative evolution of Roberto Gerhard's Epithalamion from its genesis as a film score in 1962 through to its final version, c. 1968 which makes it one of the last orchestral compositions on which Gerhard would have worked. It sits alongside two works left incomplete in 1968 Metamorphoses (the reworking of the Second Symphony) and the Fifth Symphony. It explores its origins through the film score of This Sporting Life and how this music is incorporated into the concert work and investigates the revisions made by Gerhard and end with exploring the final published version of the work.
    • Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester
      'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' provides a short, accessible, illustrated guide to key ideas that are used to describe, understand and explain drawing, for students of art, design, media, architecture and engineering, at undergraduate level and above. This accessible and readable book explains the significance of relationships between the body and the mark, visual imitation, drawing systems, drawing and writing and visual story telling, providing a simple guide to key ideas. The book unpacks the key ideas that have shaped the rich, complex and foundational activity of drawing. It presents an unexpected, engaging and authoritative range of illustrated examples of drawings made by culturally and historically diverse people for different purposes, with different media, in widely different times and situations. 'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' is plainly written, avoiding jargon and specialist language. It is user-friendly. Ideas are arranged as chapters that can be read sequentially, building a complete guide to ideas about drawing. Alternatively, chapters can be read individually, providing self-contained introductions to one of these key ideas in drawing. 'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' provides a short, accessible, illustrated guide to key ideas that are used to describe, understand and explain drawing, for students of art, design, media, architecture and engineering, at undergraduate level and above. This accessible and readable book explains the significance of relationships between the body and the mark, visual imitation, drawing systems, drawing and writing and visual story telling, providing a simple guide to key ideas. The book unpacks the key ideas that have shaped the rich, complex and foundational activity of drawing. It presents an unexpected, engaging and authoritative range of illustrated examples of drawings made by culturally and historically diverse people for different purposes, with different media, in widely different times and situations. 'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' is plainly written, avoiding jargon and specialist language. It is user-friendly. Ideas are arranged as chapters that can be read sequentially, building a complete guide to ideas about drawing. Alternatively, chapters can be read individually, providing self-contained introductions to one of these key ideas in drawing.
    • Stephen Clarke: End of the Season

      Clarke, Stephen; University of Chester
      A solo exhibition of an ongoing project that focused on family holidays at Rhyl, the seaside resort in North Wales. The exhibition at the Grosvenor Museum, Chester (25 July – 18 October 2015) comprised black & white digital photographic prints, vintage silver gelatin prints, and colour digital photomontages; a wall-mounted hand-drawn map and a DVD transfer of cine film footage; four themed vitrines that displayed photobooks, postcards and print ephemera from Clarke’s personal archive. The exhibition hinged on the artist’s photobooks of Rhyl published by the independent publisher Café Royal Books: Ocean Beach, Rhyl (2014); Rhyl Seafront (2015); and Rhyl Caravan Parks (2015). Accompanying the exhibition were two public lectures given by Stephen Clarke ‘Picturing the British Holiday’ (17 Aug. 2015) and ‘Holiday-ed in North Wales’ (17 Sept. 2015); and a public drawing performance titled ‘Drawing the End of the Season’ (25 and 26 July, 2015).
    • Adaptations: Moby Dick Performance Research Project

      Piasecka, Shelley; University of Chester
      Adaptations: Moby Dick is a performance research project, consisting of a script, stage production, and site-sensitive performance. The adaptation was commissioned for the International Cornerstone Arts Festival (2017). In-kind funding was provided by the Tall Ship Zebu for a site- sensitive performance for the River Festival, Liverpool (2019). There were two interconnected stages to the project, underpinned by three research questions: 1. How do we re-imagine character within ensemble-led practice? 2. How does dramatic time differ from narrative time? 3. What is the relationship between the source text and adapted iterations? The first stage of the project led to a fully realised stage production, shown in Liverpool and Chester (2017). A further iteration of the adaptation was performed on the Tall Ship Zebu, Liverpool (2019). Following this performance, the project considered the impact of site as cultural memory, disseminated through conference papers.
    • Postcolonial pictures examining the Penguin edition book covers of Paul Theroux's travel writing through a visual social semiotic lens

      Waller, Rhian; University of Chester
      Travel literature, Paul Theroux writes, “moves from journalism to fiction, arriving […] at autobiography” (2008: 332). Perhaps because of this hybridity, travel writing is an enduring genre, and its texts are subject to fertile academic interpretation and re-interpretation. However, less attention has been given to the paratextual elements of the travel book. Book covers play a key role in establishing the nature and context of a written work. They operate as visual social semiotic forms, comprising textual and visual signifiers that stand “for an object or concept” (Moriarty, 2011: 228). The argument here is the resulting signs may encode meanings beyond the commercial purpose of the book cover. Semiotic analysis is therefore applied to the covers of Paul Theroux’s novel-length travel books. It is argued the Penguin book covers that feature on editions released over the last 40 years frequently include covert signifiers of unequal power relationships between western travellers and the peoples and cultures they encounter.
    • Malcolm Lowry's Elephant and Colosseum: A Manx Radio Discussion

      Quayle, Cian.; University of Chester (Manx Radio, 2016-10-09)
      As part of Manx Litfest 2016 and a forerunner for a planned Manx Radio podcast of Malcolm Lowry's 'Elephant and Colosseum': Cian Quayle, Jane Killey and Doug Sandle (the author of the podcast transcript) were invited to take part in a discussion with broadcaster Roger Watterson on Manx Radio's Sunday Opinion. The contributors discussed Malcolm Lowry's life and writing and its connections with the Isle of Man, which feature in 'Hear Us O Lord from Heaven Thy Dwelling Place' (1961) with specific reference to Elephant and Colosseum.
    • The Plotlands Archive

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester
      A visual database of photographs of Plotland-era houses and chalets in the UK
    • Detours and Dislocations - Liverpool /Isle of Man / Vancouver: In the Footsteps of Malcolm Lowry

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (Williamson Art Gallery and Museum, 2019-07-07)
      An exhibition of artworks by Cian Quayle at the Williamson Art Gallery and Museum, July 7 - August 26, 2018. The installation included a neon artwork/text, a 1/50 scale model, photographs, a lightbox mounted transparency, single channel video, loaned artworks (Chris John Symes and George Cuitt), hand-made photographs from glass plate negatives and an automated 35 mm carousel, slide-projection. The research triangulates, Wirral born author of Under the Volcano (1947), Malcolm Lowry's relationship with Liverpool, the Isle of Man and Vancouver as the basis of a psychogeographic encounter with places and sites of habitation, which held significance for Lowry's life and writing. The exhibition formed part of IB 18 (Independents Biennial) and was exhibited in conjunction with 'Tom Wood: Cammell Laird Shipyard 1993 - 1996'.
    • Sculpture as screen

      carrick, stephen; University of Chester
      A multi-component output consisting of a series of three works ('Kitchen Collider', 'Office Metropolis', 'Brunel's last dream') that exist as either video projection installations or videos documenting the said installations. These works utilise projected animations to examine the nature of the screen as a sculptural concern whilst acknowledging its relationship to the vernacular and the technological. These works have been extensively disseminated from 2014 to 2020 in a variety of exhibitions. This output forms part of an on-going, larger series of works.
    • Tom Wood - The DPA Work (A Reprise - Revoiced): Photographs of Rainhill Hospital & Cammell Laird Shipyard

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester
      In 2013, in collaboration with Tom Wood, Quayle curated an exhibition entitled The DPA Work – Photographs of Rainhill Hospital and Cammell Laird Shipyard at CASC (Contemporary Art Space Chester), University of Chester. The exhibitions featured Wood’s photographs of both institutions prior to their closure. Wood was originally supported by the Documentary Photography Archive and the Open Eye Gallery in conjunction with the mental health charity MIND. The DPA was founded by Audrey Linkman and established in Manchester in 1985. Linkman commissioned photographers with whom she collaborated in negotiating and gaining access into different walks of life across the North West. The exhibitions at CASC ran concurrently and formed part of the Parallel Programme for Look 13 Liverpool International Photography Festival. The project, for which I was lead researcher also involved students undertaking an Experiential Learning module. This involved their engagement with former shipyard workers and research into established as well as community based groups in recovering narratives and objects in order to reactivate lost dialogues. The students also made visual responses to the the exhibition’s context which were also formed part of the exhibition. This project has also been embedded as part of a teaching methodology in BA Photography at the University of Chester, which encourages and fosters ‘socially engaged practices’ across a range of contexts which will also be explored as well as visually evidenced as part of this paper.
    • Tom Wood - The DPA Work

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester
      'Tom Wood - The DPA Work' is the culmination of a long term research project led by Dr Cian Quayle. The Documentary Photography Archive was founded by Audrey Linkman, in Manchester, in 1985. In 2012 photographer Tom Wood invited Quayle to investigate an archive of two landmark commissions which he had undertaken for the DPA, which had lain dormant and unseen since their deposit with the DPA and holding at Greater Manchester County Record Office. Wood first exhibited a selection of the Rainhill Hospital photographs at the Open Eye Gallery in 1988, and in 2020 current Open Eye Executive Director Sarah Fisher has described the instrumental significance of Quayle's role as 'independent researcher-curator' evidenced in new writing, the collaborations, commissions, exhibitions, publications and events, which he has curated, authored, edited, and published. The development of the book project emanated from The DPA Work exhibitions at Contemporary Art Space Chester, which featured as part of Look 13 Liverpool International Photography Festival and the publication of Tom Wood - The DPA Work are the culmination of this research. In his writing Quayle contextualised the origin of the DPA projects, the subsequent journey, reception and wider reach of Wood's work. The introductory, contextual essay 'Tom Wood - The DPA Work' revisits the basis for the original commissions and their contemporary significance and wider contextual understanding and interpretation.
    • Walking with Shadows: Index, Inscription and Event in Malcolm Lowry's In Ballast to the White Sea

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester
      A series of 15 black and white photographs and writing authored in response to the publication of a scholarly edition of Malcolm Lowry’s lost novel In Ballast to the White Sea. The photographs are integrated in an essay entitled ‘Walking with Shadows’ – a photo-text – indebted to W.G. Sebald’s use of photographs in The Rings of Saturn (1995). A method adopted which fuses ‘fiction, travelogue, history and biography’ where the images offset or displace the narrative, rather than illustrate it, as the psychic and physical journey unfolds from page to page. The text also references Denis Hollier’s essay ‘Surrealist Precipitates: Shadows Don’t Cast Shadows’, in which the position of the artist /author and the role of the reader highlights the significance of André Breton’s novel and use of photographs in Nadja (1928). The correlation of these sources includes Michel de Certeau’s ‘Walking in the City’ in The Practice of Everyday Life (1984) and Paul Auster’s novella ‘City of Glass’ in New York Trilogy (1987) where the notion of the author / protagonist are posited as interchangeable positions, as they reveal the significance of a method, in which autobiography, fact and fiction coalesce. The photographs which are imbricated within the text function as a series of staging points and motifs, which index the journey undertaken by the novel’s key protagonist. In Lowry’s novel these are uncovered in a series of surreal, psychogeographic encounters across the urban terrain and landscape, and the sonic hum, which imbues his writing. The events and locations which define the novel were rediscovered, or otherwise substituted, as they are re-inscribed in text and image. The project also integrated archive and vernacular images, which include Edward Chambré Hardman’s photographs of Liverpool and the North West as the setting which provides the point of departure for Lowry’s novel and the terrain, which was revisited for this project.
    • Concentrated Noir: Reinforcing and transgressing genre boundaries in Echo

      Waller, Rhian; University of Chester
      Nordic Noir has emerged as an increasingly codified set of aesthetic, political and philosophical televisual elements. Echo compresses these elements, subjecting them to the crucible of short film. This article investigates the dramatic potential of stripping back cross-genre tropes to reveal the defining characteristics of a newly emergent format.
    • “If ever there was someone to keep me at home”: Theorizing screen representations of siblinghood through a case study of Into the Wild (2007)

      Barnett, Katie; University of Chester
      Images of siblings pervade the screen, yet their representation remains under-explored. Though sibling relationships are common, these lateral bonds are often overlooked in favor of the vertical bonds privileged by Freudian psychoanalysis. Into the Wild (dir. Sean Penn 2007), though ostensibly focused on the solitary journey of its protagonist, Chris McCandless, can be read as a narrative of siblinghood and here serves as a case study for exploring ways of theorizing the sibling relationship on screen. Often, there is an inherent anxiety embedded within representations of close adult bonds between brothers and sisters, resulting in frequent on-screen separation. Though Chris and his sister Carine are similarly separated for the majority of the film, their relationship is foregrounded by framing Chris’s story through Carine’s re-telling. Here, the sibling pair may be better understood through the prism of modern discourses of the soulmate, emphasizing the value of knowledge to the sibling relationship and looking beyond the vertical to consider how lateral bonds might be excavated from the edges of the screen.
    • Can political public relations be used as a tool for social integration, with particular reference to the Muslim community in the UK?

      Roberts, Simon; Charles, Alec; Okour, Sarah A. (University of Chester, 2019-12)
      Political, social and demographic change has resulted in a search for new techniques for building public trust and reconciling relationships between the Muslim community and others in society. In this study, extremism and social cohesion have been chosen as potential new aims for the PR industry. This study assesses whether political PR can be diverted from its role in spin doctoring towards new cultural and social functions. My argument is that political public relations can be used as a tool for social integration with particular reference to the Muslim community in the UK. This research distinguishes between two issues. The first connects with political PR within a political communication background, which relates to politicians, election campaigns, news management, and their relationship with the media. The second issue is that political PR can be reconsidered from a corporate perspective, one that endorses the use of PR in challenging political environments. My study places emphasis on the second issue. It applies a triangulating methodology based on using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews to answer the research questions. A sample of seven UK public relations academics evaluated the current communication policies for their effectiveness, explained how political PR could help, and gave their recommendations. In addition, seven NGOs in Britain described their work, the problems they encountered, and their concerns. A lack of social integration and the continuing rise of extremism were repeatedly explained in terms of stereotyping, marginalisation, and counter-productive techniques. The results suggest that a change in political PR is possible and should be encouraged to intervene in fighting against radicalisation, extremism, and enhancing social cohesion. They also show a lack of PR support for NGOs. More broadly, my findings move the field of inclusivity forward by working on a bottom-up approach instead of a top-down model of communication. The best answer for sustaining long-term community relationships was improved communication and engagement, inclusive messages and campaigns, and the Muslim community remaining open to others in society.