• Taking the Studio by Strategy

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter
    • Tamaglitchi

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth (ACM Press, 2018)
    • Teaching by story

      Rutherford; University of Chester (2012-07-09)
      This presentation discusses the role of higher education in modern society.
    • Terrorists, rioters and crocodiles: The political symbolism of an Olympic monster

      Charles, Alec; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014-06)
      In August 2005, just a month after the announcement that London had succeeded in its bid to host the 2012 Olympic Games, the UK national press witnessed a brief rash of stories alleging the presence of a crocodile or similar water monster lurking beneath the surface of the River Lea – the river that runs from the town of Luton in Bedfordshire down to join the Thames adjacent to the Olympic site. This story re-emerged in November 2011 when a campaigner against the environmental impact of the Olympics on the river area claimed to have seen further evidence of crocodilian activity. This paper will explore the reasons for the proliferation of this story, in terms both of its function as a metonymic news-hook (it opened up directly related concerns as to the impact, organization and security of the Games) and of its metaphorical significance (its incarnation of a superstructure’s fears of an emerging threat of a monstrous underclass – one which might at once comprise terrorists, rioters and anti-establishment campaigners). It will conclude by suggesting that this monstrous myth might hold within it the possibility of the convergence of populist news media and popular democracy.
    • The 'auto cannibal'

      Turner, Jeremy; Hultum, Ben (University of Chester, 2010-10)
      The relentless triumph of technology is increasingly dismissive of the human desire for interaction; we are deprived of experiences with the ordinary and become less aware of the potential such objects contain. The author primarily considers art as a means of understanding the world and his practice is based on personal observations and autonomous processes. This can often lead to an over-analysis of the mundane, which is directly confronted in each of my projects through an enthusiasm for the objects we not only take for granted, but do so to the extent that we barely notice their existence. Drawing inspiration from literature, philosophy and ideas which surround permanence in a society which is frequently considered throwaway, the author is influenced by personal insecurities and have developed a creative style that not only explores construction - in the obsessive means by which a work is made; but also one that celebrates the process of destruction - in that the materials the author uses have the potential to instigate their own demise in a process I generally refer to as autocannibalism.
    • The abuse of power: Savile, Leveson and the Internet

      Charles, Alec; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2014-05-05)
      This book chapter discusses press responses to the Jimmy Savile scandal, and the phone hacking scandal and the Leveson inquiry.
    • The Arrival of Godot: Beckett, Cultural Memory and 1950s British Theatre

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Methuen, 2016-06-30)
      Book chapter
    • The artificial body: Speaking through stammers and silences

      Smith, Kate M. (Chester College, 1996)
      This article, originally delivered at the Body memory in performance conference at Lancaster University in August 1995, discusses some of the observed phenomena in rehearsal processes towards the performance of the damaged and dismembered bodies that inhabit Caryl Churchill and David Lan's A mouthful of birds (Methuen, 1986) and Timberlake Wertenbaker's The love of the nightgale (Faber & Faber, 1989).
    • The artist's book: Making as embodied knowledge of practice and the self

      Adams, Jeff; Waite, Julian; Kealy-Morris, Elizabeth (University of Chester, 2016-09)
      The initial research questions for this practice-based doctoral research project was to ask, "Is it possible to develop a more confident, self-conscious creative voice able to articulate one's identity more clearly through the making of handmade artefacts?"; this thesis applies the methodologies of autoethnography and pedagogy to consider an answer. My original contribution to knowledge through this enquiry is the identification of the ways in which the exploration of identity through autoethnographic, creative and pedagogic methods encourages an expanded field of self-knowledge, self-confidence and sense of creative self.
    • The ballard of Mark Chapman

      Duffett, Mark; University College Chester (Kindamuzik, 2004)
      This article discusses extreme fans, using the example of Mark Chapman.
    • 'The best is yet come' - exclusive interview with Liverpool FC and Senegal star, Sadio Mane

      Hassall, Paul; University of Chester (TI Media Limited, 2019-03-05)
      An exclusive profile-interview with Liverpool and Senegal international, Sadio Mane. The forward discusses the burden of expectation for club and country.
    • The Bogus Men: Eno, Ferry and Roxy Music

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (Continuum, 2016-08-11)
      Book chapter.
    • The book as a ruined space: palliative strategies in photographers’ publishing

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester (2015)
      Ruined spaces of our recent past leave us with premature waste in a flux of unfinished disposal. Many photographer’s books are elegaic records of such derelict spaces, yet few break free from Western codex-form publishing protocols. With rigid sequencing, determined narrative and a tendency to over-classify, many publications of this type celebrate the inevitability of decline rather than re-imagine a more contingent future. Non-codex and hybrid book forms however, are untypical, yet provide a looser, free-form narrative and for the reader, this kind of book can be as much of a ruined space as the very site it’s aiming to depict.
    • The Bookbinding Workshop: making as collaborative pedagogic practice

      Kealy-Morris, Elizabeth; University of Chester (2015-02)
      The value of Engagement is no longer questioned” (Trowler & Trowler, 2010, p.9) Trowler & Trowler, in their 2010 report for the HEA’s Student Engagement Project, note that studies have consistently shown associations between student engagement and improvements in identified desired outcomes, including cognitive development, critical thinking skills, practical competence, and skills transferability. They also note that there are specific features of engagement which improve outcomes, including student-staff contact, active learning, and cooperation amongst students such as group work and peer support. Trowler & Trowler found that interacting with staff has been shown to have a powerful impact on learning, especially when it takes place outside the classroom and responds to individual student needs. The NUS 2012 Student Experience Survey supports Trowler & Trowler’s findings. The purpose of the study was to understand student expectations of a university experience. Teaching quality was cited as the most important factor in what makes a good learning experience. Students want more engaging teaching styles that are interactive, use technology & props to make the subject more accessible and interesting. This paper will consider student engagement through collaborative teaching and learning practices I have developed within a series of bookbinding workshops in which I acquire new skills alongside my students. Developed directly from my practice-based PhD inquiry The Artist Book: making as embodied knowledge of practice & the self which emerged from my curiosity of whether new knowledge of practice, creativity, expression and the self might emerge from the embodied practice of making with one’s hands. Inspired by the research of Reid and Solomonides (2007) which suggests that for creative students to engage successfully in their studies they must have the opportunity to “develop a robust Sense of Being [sic]” . The most valuable pedagogic conditions, according to Reid and Solomonides, will be those that create learning opportunities that encourage this embodiment of the creative self. Lawrie (2008) ponders whether design educators could encourage in our students a deeper understanding of their subject beyond skills leading to employability and entrepreneurship. She suggests, “…an answer may lie in the intersection of embodiment, meaning and signification” . The bookbinding workshop developed from my desire to seek ways to engage with and alongside students in my practice and research to ground my own making within my pedagogic practice. In this way students are not being ‘instructed’ by a skilled specialist but rather collaborating with a committed enthusiast and researcher learning from their practice and experience. This paper will discuss the impact these workshops have had on participating students, their practice and their sense of “creative self” through the analysis of anonymous surveys carried over the span of two years.
    • The Bookbinding Workshop: making as collaborative pedagogical practice

      Kealy-Morris, Elizabeth; University of Chester (Wiley, 2014-10)
      “The value of Engagement is no longer questioned” (Trowler & Trowler, 2010, p.9) Trowler & Trowler, in their 2010 report for the HEA’s Student Engagement Project, note that studies have consistently shown associations between student engagement and improvements in identified desired outcomes, including cognitive development, critical thinking skills, practical competence, and skills transferability. They also note that there are specific features of engagement which improve outcomes, including student-staff contact, active learning, and cooperation amongst students such as group work and peer support. Trowler & Trowler found that interacting with staff has been shown to have a powerful impact on learning, especially when it takes place outside the classroom and responds to individual student needs. The NUS 2012 Student Experience Survey supports Trowler & Trowler’s findings. The purpose of the study was to understand student expectations of a university experience. Teaching quality was cited as the most important factor in what makes a good learning experience. Students want more engaging teaching styles that are interactive, use technology & props to make the subject more accessible and interesting. This paper will consider student engagement through collaborative teaching and learning practices I have developed within a series of bookbinding workshops away from the studio environment in which I develop new skills alongside my students. In this way students are not being ‘instructed’ by a skilled specialist but rather collaborating with a committed enthusiast.
    • The Events: Immanence and the Audience

      Pattie, David; University of Chester (de Gruyter, 2016-05-12)
      David Greig’s The Events (2013) stages the aftermath of a traumatic event; a cleric tries to come to terms with the massacre of her multicultural choir. The play uses two actors (one playing the cleric, and the other playing all the other main roles, including that of the killer). The cast, however, also includes a choir, drawn from the town where the show is being performed: the choir sings, and takes on small speaking roles (reading their lines from the script). They also serve as an audience for the action, occupying tiered seating at the back of the stage. The choir serves as a powerful reminder of what Laura Cull, in Theatres of Immanence: Deleuze and the Ethics of Performance (2012) identifies as Deleuzian immanence: a performance which stages “the participation, multiplication and extension of the human body – understood as that which is produced by relations of force and encounters with the affects of other bodies” (10). In this article, I argue that the strong affect generated by the play in performance stems mainly from the positioning of the choir, the performers and the audience as, simultaneously, participants and witnesses to trauma; and from the immanent relation of actors, choir and audience within the structure of the performance event.
    • The experience and perception of duration in three contemporary performances

      Waite, Julian; Harrop, Peter; Layton, James R. (University of Chester, 2016-04)
      I argue in this thesis that qualitative duration (viewed in opposition to the construct of quantitative clock-time) can be experienced through performance encounters that challenge smooth consumption. In a socially accelerated culture, where to do more in less time is the measure of a productive life, one’s connection with the ‘real’ time of duration is diminished. To challenge this premise, I have used an autoethnographic approach to explore an experience of duration conceived via the work of French philosopher Henri Bergson, who posits that “pure duration [is that which] excludes all idea of juxtaposition, reciprocal externality, and extension” (Bergson, 1903/1999, p. 26). In other words, Bergson asserts that duration defies quantitative measurement. I argue that the Bergsonian experience of duration offers a pause from social acceleration and effects a transformation for the spectator in the form of peak-experience, flow, and communitas.
    • The facture of ‘Dispossession’: trace, colour, light and time in a new graphic adaptation of Trollope’s 1879 novel ‘John Caldigate’.

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Comics and Adaptation Conference, University of Leicester., 2015-04-01)
      This paper will discuss my forthcoming adaptation of Anthony Trollope’s John Caldigate (1878) as a new graphic novel, Dispossession. Produced in the context of an academic conference on Trollope in 2015, the new graphic novel functions as a research outcome in the sense that its academic audience is a ‘knowing one’, to use Linda Hutcheon’s term (Hutcheon 2006:122). This audience will both expect to read the graphic novel as the product of a self-aware relationship with Trollope’s novel and make demands upon the new graphic novel that derive from its members’ own, particularly focused, experience of Trollope’s novel itself. As a result, the process of making the adaptation has distilled questions about the act of novel/comic adaptation itself that have enabled the emergence of a methodology for the adaptation process and aimed to produce the new book as a comprehensible response. Two questions have guided the adaptation: 1) What results if the existing generic constraints of graphic novels are self-consciously reformed in the process of adaptation, and the protocol for the new book derives from an analysis of Trollope’s text relative to the behaviours of its time and ours? And 2) How can Dispossession employ and/or depict equivocation in the style of its facture, distinct from the depiction of the plot? Following Walter Benjamin’s theorisation of translation, the process of creating Dispossession approaches Trollope’s text as the source of a protocol or set of governing rules, including an apprehension of the reading behaviours of his contemporaries and of contemporary graphic novel readers (Benjamin 1969:70). As a result, the relationship between novel and graphic novel constitutes both the process and product of adaptation as an experience for a knowing reader. This paper will summarise the rationalisation of methods of facture in response to the guiding questions. In particular, it will consider the ways in which specific historic depictive regimes represent specific diegetic meteorologies, and how these are associated with both historic periods and particular places. In terms of drawing style, the challenge for this adaptation lies not only in identifying the existing different behaviours of novels and graphic novels, but in meaningfully producing a new style of drawing relative to an existing writing style. It is not the task of comparing an existing style of drawing with Trollope’s writing style, but one demanding the speculative creation of new rules within which to draw. As Dispossession also has a research function, the process of meaningfully inventing a new style also demands comprehensive rationalisation. I will discuss how Trollope’s writing style formalises his approach to plot, tying style to genre. In the plot, the narrator both consistently avoids making definitive statements about events and character traits and avoids presenting a definitive opinion. Instead, information is derived from a number of different, and sometimes contradictory, sources and accumulates gradually. Trollope utilises this technique with great consistency. From an analysis of Trollope’s style emerges the question of style in the facture of the adaptation, answers to which finalise its rules of facture: how does Dispossession employ and/or depict equivocation in its facture, distinct from the depiction of the plot? To answer this question, the paper will discuss the broader temporal implications of relationships between types of plot and drawing regimes, considering in detail differences in anaphoras, special locations and discursive traditions using examples of types of facture from 19th century and 21st century narrative drawing.
    • The flight from history: from H G Wells to Doctor Who – and back again

      Charles, Alec; University of Chester (Monash University, 2009)
      This paper examines how, in the wake of 9/11, BBC Television s Doctor Who has symbolically explored that catastrophe and the efforts to con-struct a new world order in its aftermath. In doing so, it witnesses parallels with the apocalyptic and utopian visions of the programme s own greatest literary influence, the seminal science fiction of H G Wells.
    • The Hidden Brother: Nicky Graham and the Complexities of Songwriter / Producer Media Profiles

      Mason, Jim (2016-01)
      Bros were a successful late 1980s UK pop act that received significant media exposure. The group’s hits were credited to “The Brothers” on their record sleeves, a strategy suggesting - though not overtly stating - that they were written by the group members. The main creator of Bros’s musical works was actually Nicky Graham – a “hidden” writer and producer who received relatively little media attention at the height of the act’s fame. Graham was "hidden" from the public in a way which contrasted with "celebrity" producers of this era, such as Trevor Horn and Pete Waterman, and may have cost him the opportunity to gain his own fans in contrast with Horn and "celebrity" mix engineer, Tom Lord-Alge, as discussed by Hills (2014). Various popular music scholars have explored songwriting in relation to contested notions of authenticity (see Moore 2002; Cusic 2005). Drawing on ideas such as auteur theory and cultural capital, this paper discusses the results of a new interview with Graham, which was undertaken to focus specifically on the theme of "hidden" musicians. Using Graham as a case study, the paper explores how music audiences perceive the identities of “hidden” music makers and investigates precisely what factors guide the decision-making processes of a “hidden” writer/producer.