• Malcolm Lowry - Detours and Dislocations - Douglas and Dollarton: Proposals for Artworks

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (Liverpool John Moores University & the Bluecoat, Liverpool, 2017-07-28)
      As a set of 'Proposals for Artworks' and associated writing this project builds on previous research, which retraces the footsteps of Wirral-born author of Under the Volcano, Malcolm Lowry. The work emerges from photography and moving image made on location in Vancouver in June 2017. A paper entitled ‘Malcolm Lowry – Detours and Dislocations – Douglas and Dollarton’ was presented at the LJMU conference: Under the Volcano – 70 Years On: An International Malcolm Lowry Conference. A 1/50 scale model of Malcolm Lowry’s 1944 shack at Dollarton, and a carousel, slide-projected, artwork of 80, 35 mm slides (Cates Park and Maplewood Mudflats) was exhibited at the Bluecoat, Liverpool as part of the conference proceedings, July 28 - 29, 2017.
    • Marie Duval

      Grennan, Simon; Sabin; Waite, Julian; University of Chester, Central Saint Martins (Myriad Editions, 2018-03-22)
      General audience book presenting and analysing the work of Victorian cartoonist and actress Marie Duval.
    • Marie Duval: Laughter in the First Age of Leisure.

      Grennan, Simon; Sabin, Roger; Waite, Julian; University of Chester; Central Saint Martins (Illustrative Festival Berlin, 2016-10-15)
      A public exhibition of the work of 19th-century cartoonist and actress Marie Duval.
    • Marie Duval: Laughter in the First Age of Leisure.

      Grennan, Simon; Sabin, Roger; Waite, Julian; University of Chester, Central Saint Martins (Guildhall Library London, 2017-11-17)
      A public exhibition of the work of 19th-century cartoonist and actress Marie Duval.
    • Marie Duval: Victorian Cartoonist

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Myriad Editions, 2018-03-29)
      Book chapter.
    • ‘Mass May Be the Single Most Important Sensation’: Perceptual Philosophies in Dance Improvisation

      Sarco-Thomas, Malaika; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2019-04-02)
      This essay investigates how sensory perception can be cultivated as a key practice in dance improvisation performance. It looks at how artists such as Steve Paxton, Deborah Hay, and Simone Forti propose frameworks for exercising attention to perception when improvising, and how these scores can be routes towards experiencing different ways of relating to one’s environment. The essay draws on Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s contribution to theorizing sensory perception in bodily movement and in strands of ecological philosophy, developing the idea of ‘intelligent flesh’ as fundamental to both. It then uses the author’s experiences of working with these artists’ scores to investigate how perceptual attention can be creatively proposed, physicalized, performed, or, in Alva Noë’s term, ‘enacted’ in improvisation.
    • The Materiality of Conflict in Contact: Improvisational Explorations in 'Pitch'

      Sarco-Thomas, Malaika; University of Chester (Dance Studies Association, 2018-12)
      This presentation investigates the 2017 site-based dance film project Pitch, featuring choreography by Charlie Morrissey, as an investigation into the materiality of conflict within contact improvisation practices. New materialist philosophies invite reconsideration of matter as animate in ways which dance improvisers might be said to already perceive the body. Deborah Hay’s knowledgeable cells, and Steve Paxton’s animal body can arguably be read in light of Karen Barad’s notion of posthumanist ‘iterative intra-activity’ in which the consideration of the differentiated mass of thebody as nonhuman becomes another kind of choreographic agent within the performance.Working processes within the project, which included focusing on the tactility of conflict as friction and the consideration of resistance itself as a material, placed emphasis on the dancers’ material experience of the body as a key performative strategy. In this sense, matter became figured, in the words of Barad, not ‘as a mere effect or product of discursive practices, but rather as an agentive factor in its iterative materialization’ (2012: 32) in which the identity of the dancers became ‘radically reworked’. From an analysis of the choreographic process and film product, this presentation will investigate how contact improvisation practices which focus on the tactile experience of matter can be said to be examples of iterative intra-activity on multiple perceptual levels. Tactile confrontation of ‘the other’ and his/her struggle toward aliveness in movement, and confrontation of the porous materiality of the human bodybecome hallmarks of the film.
    • Medium (un)specificity as material agency – the productive indeterminacy of matter/material

      Bristow, Maxine; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2018-03-22)
      In this article, I consider some of the debates brought to the fore by the proliferation of recent textile focused exhibitions; namely the tension between a continued allegiance to medium specific conventions and the richness, hybridity and heterogeneity afforded by the post-medium condition of contemporary art. Through a new body of sculptural and installational practice I propose a constellatory opening up of textile in which the medium specific can be (re)mapped in a fluid and fragmentary way. Drawing particular reference from Adorno’s conception of the constellation and mimetic comportment, this model of practice involves a mode of behaviour that actively opens up to alterity and returns authority to the affective indeterminacy of the sensuously bound experiential encounter. This is manifest through a range of practice strategies - “thingness”, “staged (dis)contiguity”, and the play between “sensuous immediacy and corporeal containment” - which mobilise a precarious relationship between processes of attachment and detachment. Acknowledging the critical currency afforded to textile through feminist and poststructuralist critique, the work moves away from “a rhetoric of negative opposition” and predetermined discursive frameworks, returning authority to the aesthetic impulse, privileging the ambiguous resonances of an abstract sculptural language over more overt strategies of representation.
    • Medium, Knowledge, Structure: capacities for choice and the contradiction of medium-specificity in games and comics.

      Grennan, Simon; Hague, Ian; University of Chester, London College of Printing (ACME Group, University of Liege, 2016-06-01)
      A conference paper presented at ACME Research Group Conference, University of Liege.
    • Medium, knowledge, structure: capacities for choice and the contradiction of medium-specificity in games and comics.

      Grennan, Simon; Hague, Ian; University of Chester, London College of Communication (Image [&] Narrative Journal, 2018-03-01)
      Chris Ware’s Building Stories (2012) is a box containing fourteen items that can be read in any order, and for this reason it appears to offer its readers a great deal of choice over the narrative structure of the work. This paper contrasts Building Stories with the video games Fallout: New Vegas and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim to demonstrate that that although Building Stories does offer choices, these choices are not ultimately meaningful because while the reader can decide the order of presentation, they cannot decide the order of events as they can in the games, and in other examples such as Marc Saporta’s novel Composition No.1. The article draws upon the work of Seymour Chatman, Gonzalo Fresca and Espen Aarseth in analysing narratives in games and texts, and concludes by considering the implications of choice in narrative.
    • Meeting Point

      Grennan, Simon; Sperandio, Christopher; University of Chester; Rice University Houston (Arts & Heritage, 2016-05-01)
      Outputs of an artists' residency at Kirkleatham Museum.
    • Mental pictures: citizen or consumer?

      Rutherford; University of Chester (SAGE, 2008-07-01)
      This journal article discusses media images relating to health care.
    • MerzNorth Seminar 3, 28th October 2015

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (The Kurt Schwitters Society, 2015-11)
      Essay/review of the MerzNorth 3 Seminar proceedings for the November 2015 issue of the Kurt Schwitters Society Newsletter. The event was held at the University of Cumbria on the 28th October 2015. The review also includes an account of the author's paper at the seminar related to the preparation of an AHRC funding proposal related to the legacy of Kurt Schwitters internment and exile in Britain during the 1940s.
    • Metamorphosing: The Construction and Deconstruction
 of Roberto Gerhard’s Symphony No. 2

      Sproston, Darren; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2016-12-01)
      There are three structural methods, which can be summarised from Gerhard’s paper “Developments in twelve-tone technique”, that employ the series (or its derivative time-set): to fix the length of the rhythmic articulation of individual pitches; to control the ordering of the twelve transpositions of a series so each is presented once before a transposition is repeated; finally, to determine the duration of these transpositions. The series, therefore, has the ability to govern microcosmic and macrocosmic parameters of a composition. All three of these can be found in Roberto Gerhard’s Second Symphony (1957-59). On revising the Symphony in 1967-68 to create Metamorphoses he reworks the material of the original ‘the changes - from slight to complete - take place on all levels: in the writing, in the orchestration, in the ordering, in the disordering (...)’ In the process of recomposing Gerhard, at times, seems to deliberately disregard the methodology he imposed on himself in the earlier version. The aim of this chapter is to investigate how much he ignores this on revising the Symphony; how the changes he made impact on the coherence of the newer version; finally to make some suggestions as to why he felt the structures could be broken.
    • Michael Sandle: Grit in the Oyster and Ideas Never Completed

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (Cheshire West and Cheshire Council, 2018-05-18)
      'Grit in the Oyster and Ideas Never Completed' appears in the book publication which accompanies the exhibition 'Michael Sandle - Monumental Rage' at the Grosvenor Museum, May 19 - October 7. The exhibition was curated by Peter Boughton, Keeper of Art at the Grosvenor Museum. The artworks in the exhibition were loaned by the artist and Flowers Gallery, London following their exhibition entitled 'Time, Transition, and Dissent', 22 January - 20 February, 2016. Michael Sandle is one of the leading sculptors of his generation with public artworks on display worldwide. The essay takes the form of an interview based on meetings and correspondence with Sandle, which focus on a collection of the artist's sketchbooks from 1965 onwards. Sandle's work is rooted in drawing as a medium as he continually works through ideas for sculpture, which are not completed in the sense that the themes and concerns, which the work addresses thematically, are unresolved in relation to their subject and content. The sketchbooks reveal the development of thoughts and ideas for artworks and their relationship with time, place, dream and memory. These ideas are continually reformulated in drawings and etchings, which are then made manifest in site-specific works of sculpture. The essay references significant events and influential works by other artists, writers and composers which have shaped Sandle's life and work. Sandle's empathy for humanity, and the injustice and catastrophic tragedy of war are also referenced in relation to Walter Benjamin's 'Theses on the Philosophy of History' (1940) via Paul Klee's drawing 'Angelus Novus'.
    • Michael’s Story :Developing Understandings of Gypsy Traveller culture

      Owens, Allan; Pickford, Barbara; Pickford, Tony; University of Chester, University of Chester, University of Chester (Chester Academic Press., 2014-02-03)
      Practise based research in 8 schools over a three year period led to the creation of this CDROM and DVD Video. Process drama was used to develop knowledge and understanding of Gypsy Traveller Culture and Lifestyle.
    • A Mile Apart

      Connolly, Lynne; University of Chester (Lynne Connolly, 2017-10-18)
      Abstract: This paper explores through the use of photography, a parallel mapping of the ‘unspoken’ domestic sphere, the myth of the safety of home, and set against political and external events in a unique period of recent history. It is focused on Belfast, Northern Ireland and the period of ‘The Troubles’. It examines the nature of the space we inhabit, the vernacular, the everyday and how this might influence our identity. Drawing on the work of Bachelard (1969) it will also explore how the vernacular can be located in a different time frame, and therefore allows for a new representation and perspective. The recreation of a wholly new space that partially exists in our experience and further exists in our interpretation of that through memory. It exists in our own parallel universe of understanding wherein we become spectators in the drama of our past. In this research the camera is working in a reversal of representation, using potentially unreliable memory to recreate moments of past events. These moments are often fragments or elements of scenarios. It is not the reliability of memory that is in question but rather the need to have validation of a remembered thing in speaking and visualising of it. Through a series of constructed images, this paper will explore this journey of representation, memory and how the photographic mnemonic becomes a device to explore divergent memories in relation to the home as well as external influences on identity and memory.
    • Miliwn o Ddawnswyr Cymraeg: A Million Welsh Dancers

      Harrop, Angharad; University of Chester (People Dancing, 2019-05)
      Using the work of BLAS, the community strand of Pontio Arts and Innovation Centre, Bangor, this article discusses how dance is able to help achieve the aims of the Welsh Government to have a million Welsh Speakers by 2050.
    • Misrecognising Misrecognition: the Capacity to Influence in the Milieux of Comics and Fine Art

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (University of Amsterdam, 2015-06-15)
      This paper will consider some of the relationships between subjects, social institutions, media and ideas that characterise differences between the environments in which both comics and fine art are produced, used and become comprehensible. It will outline a specific theoretical framework encompassing these differences, describing the discursive co-dependency between forms of media, the uses to which they are put and the habits of thought and expectation engendered by these uses. This encompassing theoretical frame draws in particular upon Althusser, Bourdieu and Hodge and Kress, describing these relationships as ideology, deriving from Karl Mannheim’s and Marx and Engels’ critiques of ideocracy, the promotion of or resistance to ideas on the grounds of the degree to which they reproduce or contradict a dominant social structure. Utilising examples in the productions and social histories of fine artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Billy Childish, Raymond Peittbon, Lichtenstein and Manet and comics artists Grennan & Sperandio, Janette Parris and Gary Panter, the paper will explore how the relationships between the dominant ideas of one group of people, and the world experiences of other groups, include misrecognition. Those ideas that dominate social discourse in any particular circumstance are not actively misrepresented by the dominant order, according to this model, but rather misrecognised and either overlooked or accepted by others for whom they are materially disadvantageous. Referring to social studies of the fine art world by Zolberg, Danto and Dickie, and to Beaty’s recent commentary on the roles of fan culture, authorlessness and the dynamics of ‘outsider’ status, in creating the social environment of comics, the paper will finally suggest that the degrees and types of this misrecognition constitute two distinct, though continually developing, sets of social constraints that underwrite the possible meanings and uses of comics and fine art, by continually substantiating the histories of their own milieux.
    • Misrecognising Misrecognition: the Capacity to Influence in the Milieux of Comics and Fine Art.

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (2016-10-01)
      This paper will consider some of the relationships between subjects, social institutions, media and ideas that characterise differences between the environments in which both comics and fine art are produced, used and become comprehensible. It will outline a specific theoretical framework encompassing these differences, describing the discursive co-dependency between forms of media, the uses to which they are put and the habits of thought and expectation engendered by these uses. This encompassing theoretical frame draws in particular upon Althusser, Bourdieu and Hodge and Kress, describing these relationships as ideology, deriving from Karl Mannheim’s and Marx and Engels’ critiques of ideocracy, the promotion of or resistance to ideas on the grounds of the degree to which they reproduce or contradict a dominant social structure. Utilising examples in the productions and social histories of fine artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Billy Childish, Raymond Peittbon, Lichtenstein and Manet and comics artists Grennan & Sperandio, Janette Parris and Gary Panter, the paper will explore how the relationships between the dominant ideas of one group of people, and the world experiences of other groups, include misrecognition. Those ideas that dominate social discourse in any particular circumstance are not actively misrepresented by the dominant order, according to this model, but rather misrecognised and either overlooked or accepted by others for whom they are materially disadvantageous. Referring to social studies of the fine art world by Zolberg, Danto and Dickie, and to Beaty’s recent commentary on the roles of fan culture, authorlessness and the dynamics of ‘outsider’ status, in creating the social environment of comics, the paper will finally suggest that the degrees and types of this misrecognition constitute two distinct, though continually developing, sets of social constraints that underwrite the possible meanings and uses of comics and fine art, by continually substantiating the histories of their own milieux.