• Some summary data from the N.W. Wales hand osteological database

      Lewis, Stephen J.; Chester College of Higher Education (Oxbow Books (for the Osteoarchaeological Research Group), 1999-12-01)
      Probably the richest store of osteological information lies in the radiographic images stored in X-ray departments. These have been greatly under-used. As an example of the sort of data available, some summary statistics from the N.W. Wales Hand Osteological Database are given. This data may be compared with historic or extant populations. Further data is available to colleagues on request.
    • Spatial and temporal changes in the distribution of salt marsh vegetation communities in the Dee estuary, NW England, determinded from aerial photographs

      Huckle, Jonathan M.; Potter, Jacqueline; Marrs, Robert H.; University College Chester (Potter) (Springer, 2004)
    • Spatial variation in species composition of Saprolegnia, a parasitic oomycete of amphibian eggs, in Scotland

      Muir, Anna P.; Kilbride, Elizabeth; Mable, Barbara K.; University of Chester; University of Glasgow (The British Herpetological Society, 2015-10-01)
      Parasitic water moulds in the genus Saprolegnia cause mortality of amphibian embryos and reduced size at metamorphosis, leading to increased adult mortality. Most studies of virulence have focused on only a single Saprolegnia species, but the Saprolegnia species associated with amphibian eggs and their distributions are not well known. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of amphibian-associated water moulds in Scotland. In particular, we asked the questions: i) Does Saprolegnia species composition vary between sites?; and ii) Is presence of Saprolegnia related to environmental parameters? Common frog (Rana temporaria) eggs with evidence of Saprolegnia infection were sampled from ten sites, cultured, and the 28S region of the rDNA array sequenced. Thirteen samples isolated from four sites were identified as members of the Saprolegniaceae and the ITS region of these samples were subsequently sequenced to further resolve species identification. Four species of Saprolegnia were found in total, with one or two species of Saprolegnia present in each of four sites. S. diclina was the most common species identified and was found at three of the four sites. Acidity was significantly lower and altitude significantly higher at sites where Saprolegniaceae were present. Therefore, R. temporaria eggs in different pools are subject to infection by different, and in some instances more than one, species of Saprolegnia. Overall, our findings suggest that future studies of virulence need to consider the effect of multiple Saprolegnia species within a site as well as the population of origin of the amphibian host
    • Spinal motor neurite outgrowth over glial scar inhibitors is enhanced by coculture with bone marrow stromal cells

      Wright, Karina; Johnson, William Eustace Basil; Uchida, Kenzo; Bara, Jennifer J.; Roberts, Sally; Masari, Wagih E.; Aston University; Keele University
      BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Transplantation of bone marrow cells into spinal cord lesions promotes functional recovery in animal models, and recent clinical trials suggest possible recovery also in humans. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are still unclear. PURPOSE: To characterize spinal cord motor neurite interactions with human bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) in an in vitro model of spinal cord injury (SCI). STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Previously, we have reported that human MSCs promote the growth of extending sensory neurites from dorsal root ganglia (DRG), in the presence of some of the molecules present in the glial scar, which are attributed with inhibiting axonal regeneration after SCI. We have adapted and optimized this system replacing the DRG with a spinal cord culture to produce a central nervous system (CNS) model, which is more relevant to the SCI situation. METHODS: We have developed and characterized a novel spinal cord culture system. Human MSCs were cocultured with spinal motor neurites in substrate choice assays containing glial scar–associated inhibitors of nerve growth. In separate experiments, MSC-conditioned media were analyzed and added to spinal motor neurites in substrate choice assays. RESULTS: As has been reported previously with DRG, substrate-bound neurocan and Nogo-A repelled spinal neuronal adhesion and neurite outgrowth, but these inhibitory effects were abrogated in MSC/spinal cord cocultures. However, unlike DRG, spinal neuronal bodies and neurites showed no inhibition to substrates of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In addition, the MSC secretome contained numerous neurotrophic factors that stimulated spinal neurite outgrowth, but these were not sufficient stimuli to promote spinal neurite extension over inhibitory concentrations of neurocan or Nogo-A. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide novel insight into how MSC transplantation may promote regeneration and functional recovery in animal models of SCI and in the clinic, especially in the chronic situation in which glial scars (and associated neural inhibitors) are well established. In addition, we have confirmed that this CNS model predominantly comprises motor neurons via immunocytochemical characterization. We hope that this model may be used in future research to test various other potential interventions for spinal injury or disease states
    • Sport policy and development: An introduction

      Bloyce, Daniel; Smith, Andy; University of Chester (Routledge, 2009-08-06)
      This book discusses the development of sports policy, government involvement in sports policy, the development of community sports, school sports, elite sports development, and the development of mega-events such as the Olympic games.
    • Sport, health and public policy

      Waddington, Ivan; University College Chester (Elsevier, 2004-11-05)
      This book chapter examines how governments link sport and good health and complexities involved in the relationship between sport, health, and public policy. There are case studies from Britain and the USA.
    • Sporting celebrity and conspicuous consumption: A case study of professional footballers in England

      Law, Graeme; Bloyce, Daniel; Waddington, Ivan; York St John University; University of Chester
      Association football is a lucrative sport with high financial rewards for top players. However, there has been little empirical work on the lifestyles of professional footballers. Based on interviews with 29 current and former male professional footballers, this paper examines the relationship between money, status and image management within and outside the changing room. The concept of conspicuous consumption is used to help explain players’ attitudes to money, their relationships with others within the football environment and how they advertise their earnings in an environment where open discussion of wages is seen as taboo. Our findings suggest that professional footballers are expected to display a particular image of the professional footballer and this constrains players, even those on lower incomes, to buy expensive clothes and accessories in order to be accepted by others. Players who do not conform to the expected image may be subject to sanctions by their teammates.
    • The sportization of swimming: A sociological examination of the development of swimming as a modern competitive sport, c.1595-1908

      Bloyce, Daniel; Cock, Steven (University of Chester, 2012-04)
      Modern competitive swimming is a highly structured, organized, codified and regulated sport. This has not always been the case. The aim of this thesis has been to examine the long-term development of competitive forms of swimming throughout the periods between the late sixteenth and early twentieth centuries. Despite some recent historical analyses, the emergence of swimming as a modern competitive sport is an under-researched topic. There are no sociological analyses relating to the development of competitive swimming and significant gaps within much historical research. This thesis has been conducted from a sociological perspective in order to test the relative adequacy of Norbert Elias’s concept of sportization. Figurational sociologists have often examined the concept of sportization in relation to the development of contact sports such as boxing and rugby. Some authors have sought to criticize figurational sociologists for over-emphasizing issues relating to the increasing control of violence when examining the development of such activities. In this manner, there is scope to contribute to existing empirical and theoretical knowledge by testing the relative adequacy of the concept of sportization in relation to the long-term development of the predominantly non-contact sport of competitive swimming. To this end, data have been examined from a range of documentary sources. Various swimming-based texts, treatises, periodicals and magazines were examined at the British Library and Colindale Newspaper Library in London. The original minute books of the Amateur Swimming Association and its predecessor bodies have also been analyzed. In addition, a range of digitized source material has been examined from several electronic databases. It has been argued that the development of modern competitive swimming was an unplanned and unintended outcome resulting from the complex interweaving of wider social processes in England throughout the periods between the Middle-Ages and the early twentieth century. The earliest reported swimming contests took place in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in the form of a cash wager between two or more individuals. These events were less structured and regulated than modern forms of competitive swimming. Betting upon the outcome of such events was deemed to be an appropriate means to experience heightened levels of tension-excitement within the context of an emerging society in which people were increasingly expected to demonstrate greater self-control over their behaviour and emotions. More organized forms of competitive swimming gradually emerged during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The emergence of an increasingly complex network of clubs, societies and associations at local, county, district and national levels facilitated such developments and contributed to the emergence of standardized rules and regulations within the emerging sport of swimming. Such developments have been explained in relation to ongoing processes of state-formation, pacification, lengthening chains of interdependence and a gradual lowering in the threshold of repugnance within England in the period between the Middle-Ages and the early twentieth century. In this manner, it has been argued that the concept of sportization is an appropriate theoretical framework for explaining the long-term development of the modern non-contact sport of competitive swimming.
    • Sports administration on the hoof: The three points for a win ‘experiment’ in English soccer

      Bloyce, Daniel; Murphy, Patrick; University of Chester (Routledge, 2008)
      This article discusses the impact of the three points for a win reform introduced in 1981 by the English Football League.
    • Sports developtment and disability

      Smith, Andy; Haycock, David; University of Chester (Routledge, 2010-12-16)
      This book chapter is some of the key issues associated with disability sports development. It focuses on how disability has been defined and explained, and how this has informed the emergence and development of disability sport in the UK.
    • Sports participation and the 'obesity/health crisis': Reflections on the case of young people in England

      Smith, Andy; Green, Ken; Roberts, Ken; University College Chester ; University College Chester ; University of Liverpool (SAGE, 2004-12-01)
      There has been growing concern in recent years about the emergence of a supposed 'health crisis' - in the form of an 'obesity epidemic' - among young people, one of the maincauses of which, it is assumed, is their declining levels of involvement in sport and physical activity. This brief paper offers some critical comments on the taken-for-granted relationship between these two emergent 'crises' and argues that, in contrast to popular opinion, young people are, in fact, doing more sport and physical activity than at any other time in the past, but that this process has co-occurred, and continues to co-occur, with increasing levels of obesity and overweight. In order to begin to adequately explain these co-occurring processes, it is argued that we need to examine young people's lives in their total context, while noting, in particular, the continuing significance of broader social processes and the networks of relationships in which they are involved.
    • SS-31 attenuates TNF-α induced cytokine release from C2C12 myotubes

      Nye, Gareth; Lightfoot, Adam; Sakellariou, Giorgos; McArdle, Francis; Jackson, Malcolm; Griffiths, Richard; McArdle, Anne; University of Liverpool (Elsevier, 2015-08-10)
      TNF-α is a key inflammatory mediator and is proposed to induce transcriptional responses via the mitochondrial generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of TNF-α on the production of myokines by skeletal muscle. Significant increases were seen in the release of IL-6, MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5 and KC/CXCL1 and this release was inhibited by treatment with Brefeldin A, suggesting a golgi-mediated release of cytokines by muscle cells. An increase was also seen in superoxide in response to treatment with TNF-α, which was localised to the mitochondria and this was also associated with activation of NF-κB. The changes in superoxide, activation of NF-kB and release of myokines were attenuated following pre-treatment with SS-31 peptide indicating that the ability of TNF-α to induce myokine release may be mediated through mitochondrial superoxide, which is, at least in part, associated with activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-kB.
    • Staff perspectives

      Astbury-Ward, Edna; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2014-08-24)
      This chapter will focus on the medical, nursing and psychological care of the woman during the abortion process, in particular, from the perspective of staff caring for women undergoing induced abortions.
    • A stair walking interventation strategy for children with Down's syndrome

      Lafferty, Moira E. (Elsevier, 2005-01)
      This article discusses the effects of a 12-week intervention study designed to enhance the stair-walking ability of children with Down's Syndrome utilising a concept known as active therapy.
    • Standards and core components for cardiovascular disease prevention and rehabilitation; BACPR

      Cowie, Aynsley; Buckley, John P.; Doherty, Patrick; Furze, Gill; Hayward, Jo; Jones, Jennifer; Speck, Linda; Dalal, Hayes; Mills, Joseph; University Centre Shrewsbury (BMJ, 2019-01-30)
      In 2017, the British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation published its official document detailing standards and core components for cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation. Building on the success of previous editions of this document (published in 2007 and 2012), the 2017 update aims to further emphasise to commissioners, clinicians, politicians and the public the importance of robust, quality indicators of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) service delivery. Otherwise, its overall aim remains consistent with the previous publications—to provide a precedent on which all effective cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation programmes are based and a framework for use in assessment of variation in service delivery quality. In this 2017 edition, the previously described seven standards and core components have both been revised to six, with a greater focus on measurable clinical outcomes, audit and certification. The principles within the updated document underpin the six-stage pathway of care for CR, and reflect the extensive evidence base now available within the field. To help improve current services, close collaboration between commissioners and CR providers is advocated, with use of the CR costing tool in financial planning of programmes. The document specifies how quality assurance can be facilitated through local audit, and advocates routine upload of individual-level data to the annual British Heart Foundation National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation, and application for national certification ensuring attainment of a minimum quality standard. Although developed for the UK, these standards and core components may be applicable to other countries.
    • Statins increase osteoprotegerin production and apoptosis in osteoblastic cells

      Smith, Heather L.; Buck, I.; Williams, John H. H.; Marshall, Michael J. (American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 2005)
    • Statistical analyses in the physiology of exercise and kinanthropometry

      Winter, Edward; Eston, Roger; Lamb, Kevin L. (Routledge, 2001-10-01)
    • Stent Frame Movement Following Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing in the Abdominal Aorta

      Yafawi, Asma; McWilliams, Richard G.; Fisher, Robert K.; England, Andrew; Karouki, Maria; Torella, Francesco (SAGE Publications, 2018-11-28)
    • Stent Migration Following Endovascular Sealing of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

      Yafawi, Asma; McWilliams, Richard G.; Fisher, Robert K.; England, Andrew; Karouki, Maria; Torella, Francesco (Elsevier, 2019-12-09)
    • Stereoselective uptake of cell-penetrating peptides is conserved in antisense oligonucleotide polyplexes

      Favretto, Marco E.; Brock, Roland; Radboud University Medical Center (Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2014-11-10)
      Stereochemistry matters. A significant conceptual advancement is presented toward the understanding of how functional characteristics of delivery peptides can translate into functional characteristics of peptide-based oligoplexes