• The effects of a cycling warm-up including high-intensity heavy-resistance conditioning contractions on subsequent 4 km time trial performance

      Chorley, Alan; Lamb, Kevin L.; University of Chester (National Strength and Conditioning Association, 2017-03-25)
      Prior exercise has been shown to improve subsequent performance via different mechanisms. Sport-specific conditioning contractions can be used to exploit the 'post-activation potentiation' (PAP) phenomenon to enhance performance although this has rarely been investigated in short endurance events. The aim of this study was to compare a cycling warm-up with PAP-inducing conditioning contractions (CW) with a moderate intensity warm-up (MW) on performance and physiological outcomes of 4 km time trial. Ten well-trained male endurance cyclists (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 65.3 +/- 5.6 ml[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]min-1) performed two 4 km cycling time trials following a 5-minute recovery after a warm-up at 60% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max for 6.5-minutes (MW), and a warm-up with conditioning contractions (CW) consisting of 5 minutes at 60% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max then 3 x 10-seconds at 70% of peak power interspersed with 30-seconds recovery. Blood lactate concentrations were measured before and after time trial. Expired gases were analysed along with time, power output (PO), and peak forces over each 500 m split. Following CW, mean completion time was reduced (1.7 +/- 3.5 s p > 0.05), PO increased (5.1 +/- 10.5 W p > 0.05) as did peak force per pedal stroke (5.7 +/- 11 N p > 0.05) when compared to MW. V[Combining Dot Above]O2 increased (1.4 +/- 1.6 ml[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]min-1 p < 0.05) following CW, whilst RER decreased (0.05 +/- 0.02 p < 0.05). Physiological and performance differences following CW were greatest over the first 1500 m of the trials. The results suggest a PAP-inducing warm-up alters V[Combining Dot Above]O2 kinetics and can lead to performance improvements in short endurance cycling but work and recovery durations should be optimised for each athlete.
    • Effects of a four-week touch rugby and self-paced interval running intervention on health markers in active young men.

      Dobbin, Nick; Bloyce, Daniel; Hughes, Stephen; Twist, Craig (Springer, 2020-03-29)
      Background: Modified team sport activity has been proposed as effective exercise modality for promoting markers of health that are comparable or greater than continuous forms of activity. However, research using modified team sports is currently limited to sedentary populations using 2-3 sessions across a minimum of 8 weeks. Aim: To investigate the effects of a four-week touch rugby and self-paced interval running intervention on a range of health markers in active men. Methods: Sixteen participants (age 26.4 ± 6.4 years) were matched for age, demographic and physical activity before completing a single touch rugby (n = 8) or running (n = 8) session per week for four weeks. Measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, resting heart rate (RHR), body composition and biochemical status were recorded pre- and post-intervention. Results: ANCOVA analysis revealed between-group differences for impedance (P = 0.027), fat mass (P = 0.008), percentage body fat (P = 0.008) and fat free mass (P = 0.002), with greater changes after touch rugby. Systolic blood pressure decreased for both groups with greater reductions observed after touch rugby (P = 0.002). No between-group difference was observed for RHR, interleukin-6 or C-reactive protein (P > 0.05). Contrasting internal, external and perceptual loads were observed. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that a single session of touch rugby over a 4-week period elicited greater improvements in body composition and SBP that self-paced running, with both equally beneficial for improving RHR, diastolic blood pressure and improved inflammatory status in active young men.
    • The effects of a high carbohydrate diet on cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) during a period of increase exercise workload amongst Olympic and ironman triathletes

      Costa, Ricardo J. S.; Jones, G. E.; Coleman, Robert C.; Lamb, Kevin L.; Williams, John H. H. (Georg Thieme Verlag, 2005-04-11)
      This article discusses a study of the effects of a 6-day high carbohydrate (H-CHO) diet on salivary cortisol and IgA during a period of increased exercise workload with thirty-two competitively trained male triathletes.
    • Effects of a no-take reserve on mangrove fish assemblages: incorporating seascape 2 connectivity

      Marley, Guy; Deacon, Amy; Phillip, Dawn; Lawrence, Andrew; University of the West Indies; Trinidad & Tobago; University of Chester
      No-take reserves (NTRs) have been effective at conserving fish assemblages in tropical systems such as coral reefs, but have rarely been evaluated in turbid tropical estuaries. The present study evaluated the effect of a mangrove NTR on the conservation of juvenile fish abundance, commercial fish biomass and biodiversity at the assemblage level, and the abundance of juveniles, target and non-target adults at the family level. The evaluation incorporated one aspect of seascape connectivity, namely proximity to the sea, or in this case, the Gulf of Paria. Linear mixed models showed that the NTR had a positive effect only on species richness at the assemblage level. However, juvenile fish abundance, commercial fish biomass, taxonomic distinctness and functional diversity were not enhanced in the NTR. The inclusion of connectivity in these models still failed to identify any positive effects of the NTR at the assemblage level. Yet, there were significant benefits to juvenile fish abundance for 5 of 7 families, and for 1 family of non-target adults. Possible explanations for the limited success of the NTR for fish assemblages include failing to account for the ecology of fish species in NTR design, the drawbacks of ‘inside−outside’ (of the NTR) experimental designs and the fact that fishing does not always impact non-target species. It is important to recognise that mangrove NTRs do not necessarily benefit fish assemblages as a whole, but that finer-scale assessments of specific families may reveal some of the proclaimed benefits of NTRs in tropical estuaries.
    • Effects of ascorbic acid, dehydroascorbic acid and methotrexate on breast cancer cell viability.

      Dosunmu, Yewande; Owusu-Apenten, Richard K.; University of Chester, University of Ulster (Sciencedomain international, 2017-10-28)
      Aims: To examine the effects of ascorbic acid (AA), dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and methotrexate (MTX) combined treatments on (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Study Design: In-vitro method. Place and Duration of Study: Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA, United Kingdom. September 2016-2017 Methodology: Cytotoxicity tests were performed with MTX (0.01- 1000 µmol/l) alone or in combination with AA or DHA, for 72 h. Cell viability was measured by 3-4,5 dimethylthiazol-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) or Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assays. Intracellular ROS was measured by 2’,7’-dichlorofluroscein diacetate assay. Results: Treatments of MDA-MB231 cells with single agents, showed dose dependent response with 50% inhibition of cell viability (IC50) of 110.5-201.4 µmol/l (MTX), 2237-5703 µmol/l (AA) or 2474 µmol/l (DHA). Combination studies showed clear synergisms for MTX (~10 µmol/l) and DHA or AA (1100 µmol/l) but weak or no interactions at other concentrations. Three days combination treatment of DHA showed decrease of ROS, which was reversed by MTX (>10 µmol/l). Conclusions: Co-treatment of methotrexate with AA or DHA showed synergism (C1<1.0) and enhanced cytotoxicity of the anti-folate towards MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Intracellular ROS decreased with AA and DHA treatment, which might be useful for reducing MTX-related oxidative stress.
    • The effects of Bodymax high-repetition resistance training on measures of body composition and muscular strength in active adult women

      O'Connor, Tracey E.; Lamb, Kevin L.; Chester College of Higher Education (National Strength and Conditioning Association, 2003-08)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a light, high-repetition resistance-training program on skinfold thicknesses and muscular strength in women. Thirty-nine active women (mean age 38.64 +/- 4.97 years) were randomly placed into a resistance-training group (RT; n = 20) or a control group (CG; n = 19). The RT group performed a resistance-training program called Bodymax for 1 hour, 3 d.wk(-1), which incorporated the use of variable free weights and high repetitions in a group setting. The CG group continued its customary aerobic training for 1 hour 3 d.wk(-1). Five skinfold and 7 muscular strength measures were determined pretraining and after 12 weeks of training. Sum of skinfolds decreased (-17 mm; p < 0.004) and muscular strength increased (+57.4 kg; p < 0.004) in the RT group. Effect sizes for individual skinfold sites and strength measures were "medium" and "high," respectively. Bodymax is an effective resistance-training program for reducing skinfold thickness and increasing muscular strength in active women. Therefore, women with a similar or lower-activity status should consider incorporating such training into their regular fitness programs.
    • Effects of dissociated glucocorticoids on OPG and RANKL in osteoblastic cells

      Humphrey, E. L.; Williams, John H. H.; Davie, Michael W. J.; Marshall, Michael J.; Charles Salt Centre, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry ; University College Chester ; Charles Salt Centre, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry ; Charles Salt Centre, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (Elsevier, 2006-05)
      This article demonstrates that dexamethasone, prednisolone, deflazacort and the dissociated glucocorticoids, RU24858, RU40066, RU24782, AL438-F1 and ZK216348 significantly inhibit osteoprotegerin (OPG) production in two human osteoblastic cell lines (MG63 and hFOB).
    • The effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on endurance performance

      Twist, Craig; Lamb, Kevin L.; Nicholas, Ceri; Burt, Dean G. (University of Chester, 2013)
      It is well documented that engaging in resistance exercise can lead to further improvements in endurance performance. Whilst, not fully understood, it is speculated that increased motor unit recruitment, improved muscle coordination and enhanced utilisation of stored elastic energy after resistance-based exercise improves exercise economy. Nevertheless, while prolonged exposure to resistance training improves endurance performance in the long-term, a consequence of such training when unaccustomed is the appearance of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Exercise-induced muscle damage is well known to affect athletic performance requiring muscular strength and power; however, its effects on markers of endurance exercise are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of EIMD on endurance performance, with an emphasis on the physiological (oxygen uptake; , minute ventilation; ), metabolic (blood lactate; [La]), perceptual (rating of perceived exertion; RPE) and kinematic (stride length; SL, stride frequency; SF) responses during sub-maximal endurance exercise.
    • The effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on maximal intensity intermittent exercise performance

      Twist, Craig; Eston, Roger; University College Chester ; University of Exeter (Spring-Verlag, 2009-05-18)
      Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common occurrence following activities with a high eccentric component. Alterations to the torque-velocity relationship following EIMD would appear to have serious implications for athletic performance, particularly as they relate to impairment of maximal intensity exercise. However, this has been studied infrequently. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of EIMD on maximal intermittent sprint performance. Ten male participants (age 22.4±3.2 years, height 178.6±5.2 cm, mass 80.6±10.7 kg) performed 10×6 s cycle ergometer sprints, interspersed with 24 s recovery against a load corresponding to 0.10 kp/kg and 10×10 m sprints from a standing start, each with 12 s active (walking) recovery. All variables were measured immediately before and at 30 min, 24, 48 and 72 h following a plyometric exercise protocol comprising of 10×10 maximal counter movement jumps. Repeated measures ANOVA showed significant changes over time (all P<0.05) for perceived soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity (CK), peak power output (PPO), sprint time and rate of fatigue. Soreness was significantly higher (P<0.01) than baseline values at all time intervals (3.1, 4.9, 5.5 and 3.2 at 30 min, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively). CK was significantly elevated (P<0.05) at 24 h (239 IU/l) and 48 h (245 IU/l) compared to baseline (151 IU/l). PPO was significantly lower (P<0.05) than baseline (1,054 W) at all time intervals (888, 946, 852 and 895 W, at 30 min, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively). The rate of fatigue over the ten cycling sprints was reduced compared to baseline, with the greatest reduction of 48% occurring at 48 h (P<0.01). This was largely attributed to the lower PPO in the initial repetitions, resulting in a lower starting point for the rate of fatigue. Values returned to normal at 72 h. Sprint times over 10 m were higher (P<0.05) at 30 min, 24 h and 48 h compared to baseline (1.96 s) with values corresponding to 2.01, 2.02 and 2.01 at 30 min, 24 h and 48 h, respectively. Values returned to baseline by 72 h. The results provide further evidence that, following a plyometric, muscle-damaging exercise protocol, the ability of the muscle to generate power is reduced for at least 3 days. This is also manifested by a small, but statistically significant reduction in very short-term (?2 s) intermittent sprint running performance. These findings have implications for appropriate training strategies in multiple sprint sports.
    • Effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on resting metabolic rate, sub-maximal running and post-exercise oxygen consumption

      Burt, Dean G.; Lamb, Kevin L.; Nicholas, Ceri; Twist, Craig; Staffordshire University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2013-04-08)
      Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), described as the acute weakness of the musculature after unaccustomed eccentric exercise, increases oxidative metabolism at rest and during endurance exercise. However, it is not known whether oxygen uptake during recovery from endurance exercise is increased when experiencing symptoms of EIMD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of EIMD on physiological and metabolic responses before, during and after sub-maximal running. After a 12 h fast, eight healthy male participants completed baseline measurements comprising resting metabolic rate (RMR), indirect markers of EIMD, 10 min of sub-maximal running and 30 min of recovery to ascertain excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Measurements were then repeated at 24 and 48 h after 100 Smith-machine squats. Data analysis revealed significant (PB0.05) increases in muscle soreness and creatine kinase (CK) and decreases in peak knee extensor torque at 24 and 48 h after squatting exercise. Moreover, RMR, physiological, metabolic and perceptual responses during sub-maximal running and EPOC were increased in the two days after squatting exercise (PB0.05). It is suggested that the elevated RMR was a consequence of a raised energy requirement for the degradation and resynthesis of damaged muscle fibres. The increased oxygen demand during sub-maximal running after muscle damage was responsible for the increase in EPOC. Individuals engaging in unaccustomed resistance exercise that results in muscle damage should be mindful of the increases in resting energy expenditure and increased metabolic demand to exercise in the days that follow.
    • The effects of in-season, low-volume sprint interval training with and without sport-specific actions on the physical characteristics of elite academy rugby league players

      Dobbin, Nick; Highton, Jamie M.; Moss, Samantha; Twist, Craig (Human Kinetics, 2020-05-01)
      Purpose: To determine the utility of a running and rugby-specific, in-season sprint interval interventions in professional rugby league players. Methods: Thirty-one professional academy rugby players were assigned to a rugby-specific (SITr/s, n = 16) or running (SITr, n = 15) sprint interval training group. Measures of speed, power, change of direction (CoD) ability, prone Yo-Yo IR1 performance and heart rate recovery (HRR) were taken before and after the 2-week intervention as were sub-maximal responses to the prone Yo-Yo IR1. Internal, external and perceptual responses were collected during SITr/s/SITr, with wellbeing and neuromuscular function assessed before each session. Results: Despite contrasting (possible to most likely) internal, external and perceptual responses to the SIT interventions, possible to most likely within-group improvements in physical characteristics, HRR and sub-maximal responses to the prone Yo-Yo IR1 were observed after both interventions. Between-group analysis favoured the SITr/s intervention (trivial to moderate) for changes in 10 m sprint time, CMJ, change of direction and medicine ball throw as well as sub-maximal (280-440 m) high metabolic power, PlayerLoad™ and acceleratory distance during the prone Yo-Yo IR1. Overall changes in wellbeing or neuromuscular function were unclear. Conclusion: Two-weeks of SITr/s and SITr was effective for improving physical characteristics, HRR and sub-maximal responses to the prone Yo-Yo IR1, with no clear change in wellbeing and neuromuscular function. Between-group analysis favoured the SITr/s group, suggesting that the inclusion of sport- specific actions should be considered for in-season conditioning of rugby league players.
    • The effects of intake of bread with treated corn bran inclusion on postprandial glycaemic response

      Cui, Zhiming; Li, Weili; Kennedy, Lynne; Department of Clinical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Chester
      In the current study, corn bran was treated with hydrothermal processing and then incorporated into bread. The consumption of bread with inclusion of treated corn bran (TCB) and control bread (CB) on postprandial glycaemic response was investigated in a randomised crossover intervention trial with eleven healthy participants and one hyperglycaemicparticipant, capillary blood samples were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 minutes after consuming the bread. The results showed the baseline-adjusted peak value of postprandial blood glucose with consumption of CB, containing 75 g carbohydrate was 4.27 mmol/L at 60 min after meal, but with consumption of treated corn bran bread (TCBB), containing 75 g carbohydrate was 3.88 mmol/L at 45 min after meal. In addition, the postprandial blood glucose concentration with consumption of CB is consistently higher than that with the consumption of TCBB since the peak time to 120 min. However, there was no significant differences, in turn, the incremental area under the curves (IAUC) with baseline-adjusted for CB consumption is consistently higher than that of TCBB consumption, but not any significant difference either (p>0.05). However, it is interesting to notice that more considerable difference in rise of blood sugar at peak time and thereafter for hyperglycaemicparticipant between the consumptions of TCBB and CB. In conclusion, the consumption of bread with inclusion of TCB is able to reduce the postprandial glycaemic response to a lower level compared with the consumption of CB and the more obvious difference was observed with the hyperglycaemicparticipant and healthy group Key words: Corn bran, hydrothermal treatment, postprandial glycaemic response. Intervention trial.
    • The effects of physical contact type on the internal and external demands during a rugby league match simulation protocol.

      Norris, Jonathan; Highton, Jamie M.; Hughes, Stephen F.; Twist, Craig; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2016-02-09)
      This study investigated how the type of contact influences physiological, perceptual and locomotive demands during a simulated rugby league match. Eleven male university rugby league players performed two trials of the rugby league movement simulation protocol for forwards (RLMSP-i) with a traditional soft tackle bag (BAG) and a weighted tackle sled (SLED) to replicate contact demands. Locomotive rate, sprint speed, tackle intensity, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion and blood lactate concentration were analysed in four periods during the first and second bout of both trials. Countermovement jump (CMJ) was measured before and immediately after each trial. More time was spent in heart rate zone between 90 – 100% HRpeak during the first (effect size ± 95% confidence interval: 0.44 ± 0.49) and second bout (0.44 ± 0.43), and larger (0.6 ± 0.69) decrements in CMJ performance were observed during SLED (5.9, s = 4.9%) compared to BAG (2.6, s = 5.4%). Sprint into contact speed was faster during BAG compared to SLED in the first (1.10 ± 0.92) and second bout (0.90 ± 0.90), which impaired high intensity running ability but did not increase physiological strain. Changing the type of contact during the match simulation subtly altered both the internal and external load on participants. These findings indicate that tackle training apparatus should be considered regarding the outcome of a training session.
    • The effects of targeted therapy on cell viability and apoptosis on CML and AML cell lines

      Williams, John; Ireland, Elyse; Marsico, Paolo (University of Chester, 2019-01-15)
      Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are currently the first therapy option for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. However, many patients affected by CML and AML may develop resistance to TKIs or may not recover under this treatment regime. New potential and more effective treatments are recently emerging. Heat shock protein inhibitors (HSPIs) and the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib are drugs which have been yet to be successfully tested on leukemic patients, despite being successful on other malignancies such as multiple myeloma (MM). The combination between HSPIs and Bortezomib could potentially be successful in killing leukemic cells, by enhancing their respective molecular mechanisms. Indeed, HSPIs would bind to HSP72 avoiding the protein to exert its ligase function to the proteasome, whilst Bortezomib could stop the ubiquitinated proteins to enter the proteasome and ultimately inducing apoptosis. To test the effects of such combination, cell viability was measured via MTS assay, apoptosis levels were tested through Annexin V\PI assays. Involvement of HSP72 and pro-survival protein Bcl-2 were measured via flow-cytometry. The cells were administered with HSPIs and Bortezomib first as single agents for 24 hours, to establish working minimal concentration. Also, the drugs were tested for a shorter time, to understand when the drugs start to be effective. It emerged that one hour is sufficient for the drugs to give an initial effect in terms of cell viability and apoptosis. Following, combination experiments of HSPIs and Bortezomib were performed; the first drug was administered for one hour, the second following one hour and the cells were incubated for 24 hours. This was repeated alternatively for both type of drugs on the different cell lines. MTS and Annexin V\PI showed that there is not a synergistic effect between drugs, but instead there is antagonism. No necrosis was found at any level of the study. The cells were then probed for HSP72 and Bcl-2, to investigate their involvement in apoptosis mechanisms. Following 6 hours of combined and single agent treatment, both type of drugs inhibit HSP72 but failed to reduce the expression of Bcl-2, particularly on AML cells. It is thus proposed that CML and AML cells may die by apoptosis following a short time of treatment with HSPIs and Bortezomib by an extrinsic pathway of apoptosis, independent from Bcl-2 involvement and from mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. This study may be the first to indicate a potential use of HSPIs and Bortezomib on CML and AML patients for a short time of treatment, although not in combination. Future studies are needed to further investigate the mechanisms of action of these drugs, aiming to potentially give CML and AML patients another successful therapy option to overcome resistance to canonic chemotherapy.
    • Effects of temperature and solvent condition on phase separation induced molecular fractionation of gum arabic/hyaluronan aqueous mixtures

      Hu, Bing; Han, Lingyu; Gao, Zhiming; Zhang, Ke; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O.; Yang, Jixin; Fang, Yapeng; Hubei University of Technology; Wrexham Glyndwr University (Elsevier, 2018-05-14)
      Effects of temperature and solvent condition on phase separation-induced molecular fractionation of gum arabic/hyaluronan (GA/HA) mixed solutions were investigated. Two gum arabic samples (EM10 and STD) with different molecular weights and polydispersity indices were used. Phase diagrams, including cloud and binodal curves, were established by visual observation and GPC-RI methods. The molecular parameters of control and fractionated GA, from upper and bottom phases, were measured by GPC-MALLS. Fractionation of GA increased the content of arabinogalactan-protein complex (AGP) from ca. 11% to 18% in STD/HA system and 28% to 55% in EM10/HA system. The phase separation-induced molecular fractionation was further studied as a function of temperature and solvent condition (varying ionic strength and ethanol content). Increasing salt concentration (from 0.5 to 5 mol/L) greatly reduced the extent of phase separation-induced fractionation. This effect may be ascribed to changes in the degree of ionization and shielding of the acid groups. Increasing temperature (from 4oC to 80oC) also exerted a significant influence on phase separation-induced fractionation. The best temperature for GA/HA mixture system was 40oC while higher temperature negatively affected the fractionation due to denaturation and possibly degradation in mixed solutions. Increasing the ethanol content up to 30% showed almost no effect on the phase separation induced fractionation.
    • Effects of transportation, transport medium and re-housing on Xenopus laevis (Daudin)

      Holmes, Andrew M.; Emmans, Christopher J.; Coleman, Robert C.; Smith, Tessa E.; Hosie, Charlotte A.; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2018-03-12)
      Understanding the immediate and longer-term effects of transportation and re-housing in a laboratory species is crucial in order to refine the transfer process, enable the optimal introduction of new animals to a novel environment and to provide a sufficient acclimatisation period before usage. Whilst consideration of animal welfare in most model vertebrate species has received attention, little quantitative evidence exists for the optimal care of the common laboratory amphibian Xenopus laevis. Techniques for the non-invasive welfare assessment of amphibians are also limited and here a non-invasive physiological assay was developed to investigate the impacts of transportation, transport medium and re-housing on X. laevis. First the impacts of transportation and transport medium (water, damp sponge or damp sphagnum moss) were investigated. Transportation caused an increase in waterborne corticosterone regardless of transport medium. Frogs transported in damp sphagnum moss also had a greater decrease in body mass in comparison to frogs not transported, suggesting that this is the least suitable transport medium for X. laevis. Next the prolonged impacts of transportation and re-housing were investigated. Frogs were transported between research facilities with different housing protocols. Samples were collected prior to and immediately following transportation, as well as 1 day, 7 days and 35 days after re-housing. Water-borne corticosterone increased following transportation and remained high for at least 7 days, decreasing to baseline levels by 35 days. Body mass decreased following transportation and remained lower than baseline levels across the entire 35 day observation period. These findings suggest the process of transportation and re-housing is stressful in this species. Together these findings have important relevance for both improving animal welfare and ensuring optimal and efficient scientific research.
    • The effects of variable resistance using chains on bench throw performance in trained rugby players

      Godwin, Mark S.; Fernandes, John; Twist, Craig; University College Birmingham; University of Chester (Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2018-04-01)
      This study sought to determine the effects of variable resistance using chain resistance on bench throw performance. Eight male rugby union players (19.4 ± 2.3 y, 88.8 ± 6.0 kg, 1RM 105.6 ± 17.0 kg) were recruited from a national league team. In a randomised cross-over design participant’s performed three bench throws at 45% one repetition maximum (1RM) at a constant load (No Chains) or a variable load (30% 1RM constant load, 15% 1RM variable load; Chains) with seven days between conditions. For each repetition the peak and mean velocity, peak power, peak acceleration and time to peak velocity were recorded. Differences in peak and mean power were very likely trivial and unclear between the Chains and No Chains conditions, respectively. Possibly greater peak and likely greater mean bar velocity were accompanied by likely to most likely greater bar velocity between 50-400 ms from initiation of bench press in the Chains compared to the No Chains condition. Accordingly, bar acceleration was very likely greater in the Chains compared to the No Chains condition. In conclusion, these results show that the inclusion of chain resistance can acutely enhance several variables in the bench press throw and gives support to this type of training.
    • The Efficacy of Energy-Restricted Diets in Achieving Preoperative Weight Loss for bariatric Pateints: A Systematic Review

      Naseer, Fathimath; Shabbir, Asim; Livingstone, Barbara; Price, Ruth; Syn, Nicholas, L; Flannery, Orla; Ulster University; National University Hospital, Singapore; University of Chester (Springer Verlag, 2018-08-18)
      In bariatric practice, a preoperative weight loss of at least 5% is recommended. However, the hypocaloric diets prescribed vary and no consensus exists. This study examined the efficacy of preoperative diets in achieving 5% weight loss. From a systematic literature search, eight randomised controlled trials (n = 862) were identified. Half of the trials used a Bvery-low-calorie diet^ whilst the rest employed a Blow-calorie diet^. Only five diets achieved ≥ 5% weight loss over varying durations and energy intakes. By inference, compliance with a 700–1050 kcal (2929–4393 kJ) diet, consisting of moderate carbohydrate, high protein and low/moderate fat, for 3 weeks is likely to achieve 5% weight loss. A low-carbohydrate diet (< 20 g/day) may achieve this target within a shorter duration. Additional research is required to validate these conclusions.
    • The efficacy of using Appropriate Paper-based Technology postural support devices in Kenyan children with Cerebral Palsy

      Barton, Catherine; Buckley, John P.; Samia, Pauline; Williams, Fiona; Taylor, Sue; Lindoewood, Rachel; University Centre Shrewsbury - University of Chester
      Purpose: Appropriate paper-based technology (APT) is used to provide postural support for children with cerebral palsy (CP) in low-resourced settings. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the impact of APT on the children’s and families’ lives. Materials and methods: A convenience sample of children with CP and their families participated. Inclusion was based on the Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V. APT seating or standing frames were provided for six months. A mixed methods impact of APT devices on the children and families included the Family Impact Assistive Technology Scale for Adaptive Seating (FIATS-AS); the Child Engagement in Daily Life (CEDL) questionnaire; and a qualitative assessment from diary/log and semi-structured interviews. Results: Ten children (median 3 years, range 9 months - 7 years). Baseline to follow-up median (IQR) FIATS-AS were: 22.7 (9.3) and 30.3 (10.2), respectively (p = 0.002). Similarly mean (SD) CEDL scores for “frequency” changed from 30.5 (13.2) to 42.08 (5.96) (p=0.021) and children’s enjoyment scores from 2.23 (0.93) to 2.91 (0.79) (p = 0.019). CEDL questionnaire for self-care was not discriminatory; seven families scored zero at both baseline and 6 months. Qualitative interviews revealed three key findings; that APT improved functional ability, involvement/interaction in daily-life situations, and a reduced family burden of care. Conclusion: APT devices used in Kenyan children with non-ambulant CP had a meaningful positive effect on both the children’s and their families’ lives.
    • Effort Perception

      Lamb, Kevin L.; Eston, Roger; Parfitt, Gaynor; University of Chester; University of South Australia (Oxford University Press, 2017-04-27)
      Research addressing children's perceptions of exercise effort (their ‘perceived exertion’) has appeared steadily in the scientific literature over the last 30 years. Accepting that the established Borg adult rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale was not appropriate for children, investigators set about developing child-specific scales which employed numbers, words and/or images that were more familiar and understandable. Numerous studies have examined the validity and reliability of such scales as the CERT, PCERT and OMNI amongst children aged 5 to 16, across different modes of exercise (cycling, running, stepping, resistance exercise), protocols (intermittent vs. continuous, incremental vs. non-incremental) and paradigms (estimation vs. production). Such laboratory-based research has enabled the general conclusion that children can, especially with practice, use effort perception scales to differentiate between exercise intensity levels, and to self-regulate their exercise output to match various levels indicated on them. However, inconsistencies in the methodological approaches adopted diminish the certainty of some of the interpretations made by researchers. In addition, though often mentioned, the would-be application of effort perception in physical education and activity/health promotion contexts has been relatively ignored. Accordingly, the scope for research in this applied domain is now considerable.