• England's first soil trail

      Burek, Cynthia V. (Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 2005)
      This article discusses the creation of a soil trail in Delamere Forest in Cheshire. The trail has eight different acid types in a small area and is used as a teaching resource by forensic biology students at University College Chester.
    • Enhanced growth-inhibitory effect of microemulsified curcumin formulation in human prostate cancer LNCaP Cells

      Dubey, Vaibhav; Owusu-Apenten, Richard K.; University of Chester, University of Ulster (Sciencedomain international, 2015-01-01)
      Aim: To assess the effect of curcumin microemulsified with non-ionic surfactant surfynol 465 W or dispersed using edible oils on prostate LNCaP cancer cell viability and glutathione status. Methodology: LNCaP cells were treated for 72-144 hr with curcumin dissolved with fish or corn oil and microemulsified using non-ionic surfactant surfynol 465 W; alternatively LNCaP cells were treated with curcumin directly dispersed in fish or corn oil (0-50 μM) for 24 -72-144 hr. Cell viability was determined using resazurin (Vision blueTM) fluorescence assay. Glutathione status was determined by monochlorobimane (MCB) assay. Results: Treatment with 0-34 μM of microemulsified curcumin produced moderate cytotoxic effect on LNCaP cells, no 50% reduction of cell viability was observed graphically. However, when LNCaP cells were treated with curcumin dispersed with corn oil the concentration or 50% reduction of cell viability (IC50) was 12-45 μM. Similarly for cells treated with curcumin dispersed with fish oil, the IC50 was between 20-40 μM. Cytotoxic doses of curcumin dispersed with corn or fish oil increased GST status in cells by 272-656% (p =<0.01). Conclusion: Microemulsified curcumin formulation prepared using fish or corn oil and surfynol 465 W surfactant had an inhibitory effect on viability of LNCaP cells as did direct dispersion of curcumin in fish or corn oil coupled with the ability for inducing intracellular GST status in LNCaP cells.
    • The erectile dysfunction revolution

      Astbury-Ward, Edna; Deeside Community Hospital (Scutari Projects, 2001-04)
      Erectile dysfunction affects approximately one in ten men at some point in their lives. This article describes its causes and the treatments available, and examines the effect it can have on those who experience the condition.
    • ESD - The Extra-curricular dimention

      Lipscombe, Bryan P. (The Environment Association for Universities and Colleges, 2007-04-18)
    • Established-outsider relations between males and females in male-associated sports in Ireland

      Liston, Katie; University College Chester (The European Association for Sociology of Sport, 2005)
      This paper introduces readers to the field of male-associated sports in the Republic of Ireland with specific reference to power relations between the sexes. It situates a present-day social phenomenon, i.e. Irish females’ increasing involvement in traditional male-associated sports such as Gaelic football, rugby and soccer, within the context of social processes in which more or less independent groups have become more interdependent. Qualitative data from twelve in-depth interviews with high performance female athletes are situated within a sociological analysis of the emergence and development of these sports for women. These are used to support the argument that the relatively slight shift in the balance of power in favour of females has led to feelings of emancipation amongst females and resistance amongst males, though this resistance is gradually becoming weaker. Elias’ theory of “established-outsider” relations is used to suggest that females who participate in these sports can be described as an ‘outsider’ group, one that has lacked the organizational resources and networks of mutual assistance needed to shift significantly the uneven balance of power between the sexes. Moreover, typical of outsiders in their relations with the ‘established’, dominant stereotypical views of females remain embedded in the personality structures of ‘outsiders’.
    • Established-outsider relations between males and females in sports in Ireland

      Liston, Katie; University College Chester (Sociological Association of Ireland, 2005)
    • Establishing a learning mentor service within a cluster of primary schools: Learning from evaluation

      Davies, Sarah; Thurston, Miranda; University College Chester (The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education, 2005)
      This paper describes a learning mentor service commissioned by the Children's Fund that has been established in a cluster of primary schools, offering a possible model for the provision of pastoral care to support children at risk of underachieving. In particular, it explores issues relevant to the implementation of the service, namely communication, co-ordination and time, and identifies benefits and outcomes of the service, as perceived by the various stakeholders. Evaluation of this service, on which the paper reports, highlights the importance of developing a clear quality care pathway, and putting systems in place to obtain information regarding the outcomes of the service.
    • Establishing the reach of Cheshire Children's Fund: April 2006 - March 2007

      Alford, Simon; Thurston, Miranda; University of Chester, Centre for Public Health Research (University of Chester, 2008-01)
      Monitoring and evaluation is a significant and obligatory element of Children’s Fund projects nationwide, with statutory returns made to the Department for Children, Schools and Families. The aim of the additional monitoring work commissioned by Cheshire Children’s Fund and carried out by the Centre for Public Health Research was to provide a more detailed picture of the children who had been referred to services, and for what reasons. This was made possible through the development of a system to track individuals and capture routine service data.
    • Establishing the reach of the Cheshire Children's Fund April 2005 - March 2006: Database development and implementation

      Alford, Simon; Thurston, Miranda (Centre for Public Health Research, University of Chester, 2006-10)
      This project report discusses the development of a system that identified individual service users from a selected number of Cheshire Children's Fund services chosen to provide electronic data to allow detailed analysis. The majority of services asked to provide electronic data returns were either based in schools or with serivces which were providing support to schools.
    • Estimates of Energy Intake and Expenditure in Elite Female Touch Players During an International Tournament

      Marsh, Nicola; Dobbin, Nick; Twist, Craig; Curtis, Chris; St Mary’s University; University of Chester (Human Kinetics, 2017-12)
      This study assessed energy intake and expenditure of international female Touch players during an international tournament. Energy intake (food diary) and expenditure (accelerometer, global positioning system) were recorded for 16 female Touch players during a four-day tournament, competing in 8.0 ± 1.0 matches; two on days one, two and four, and three on day three. Total daily energy expenditure (43.6 ± 3.1 Kcal.kg-1 body mass (BM)) was not different (P > 0.05) from energy intake (39.9 ± 9.4 Kcal.kg-1 BM). Carbohydrate intakes were below current recommendations (6-10 g.kg-1 BM) on days one (4.4 ± 0.6 g.kg-1 BM) and three (4.7 ± 1.0 g.kg-1 BM) and significantly below (P < 0.05) on day two (4.1 ± 1.0 g.kg-1 BM). Protein and fat intakes were consistent with recommendations (protein; 1.2 - 2.0 g.kg-1 BM, fat; 20 - 35 % total Kcal) across days one to three (protein; 1.9 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 0.8 & 2.0 ± 0.7 g.kg-1 BM, fat; 35.6 ± 6.8, 38.5 ± 6.4 & 35.9 ± 5.4 % total Kcal). Saturated fat intakes were greater (P < 0.05) than recommendations (10 % total Kcal) on days one to three (12.4 ± 2.9, 14.2 ± 5.1 & 12.7 ± 3.5 % total Kcal). On average, female Touch players maintained energy balance. Carbohydrate intakes appeared insufficient and might have contributed to the reduction (P < 0.05) in high-intensity running on day three. Further research might investigate the applicability of current nutrition recommendations and the role of carbohydrate in multi-match, multi-day tournaments.
    • Europeanisation, Bosman and the financial 'crisis' in English professional football: Some sociological comments

      Platts, Chris; Smith, Andy (2007-04)
      This paper discusses an sociological explaination as to the extent to which Europeanisation process, among others, have contributed to an increasingly unequal concentration of financial resources among a small number of English football clubs. The impact of the Bosman case is discussed.
    • Europeanisation, Bosman and the financial 'crisis' in English professional football: some sociological comments

      Platts, Chris; Smith, Andy (2007-05)
      This paper discusses an sociological explaination as to the extent to which Europeanisation process, among others, have contributed to an increasingly unequal concentration of financial resources among a small number of English football clubs. The impact of the Bosman case is discussed.
    • Evaluation of a multi-factorial falls prevention service

      Caiels, James; Thurston, Miranda; University of Chester (2005-11-02)
    • An evaluation of Advice 4 Youth: A health and support service for young people

      Perry, Catherine; Jones, Jenny; Thurston, Miranda; Chester College of Higher Education (Chester College of Higher Education, 2000-12)
      This report discusses and evaluates the work of Advice 4 Youth - in particular it seeks to develop effective and efficient systems for routine data collection, provide data on uptake of services by young people, analyse data to reveal a pattern of useage in relation to key variables, and assess the general progress of Advice 4 Youth.
    • Evaluation of heat shock protein 70 as a biomarker of environmental stress in Fucus serratus and Lemna minor

      Ireland, H. Elyse; Harding, Steve J.; Bonwick, Graham A.; Jones, Michael; Smith, Christopher J.; Williams, John H. H.; University College Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2004-03)
      Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are known to be induced in response to short-term stress. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Hsp70 as a biomarker of stress produced by increased temperature, osmotic pressure, and exposure to cadmium and sodium chloride in marine macroalgae and fresh water plant species. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA) was developed with a working range of 0.025-10 μg ml-1 using a monoclonal antibody raised against purified Hsp70 of Phaseolus aureus (mung bean). Fucus serratus (toothed wrack), Chondrus crispus (Stackhouse or Carrageen moss), Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) and Lemna minor (common duckweed) sample extracts were stressed for up to 24 h and then tested in the IC-ELISA. The presence of Hsp70 and cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by Western blot. The heat shock response was confirmed in each species using a 2-h 42°C treatment. Following heat shock, Hsp70 concentrations increased to a peak at 2 h (F. serratus) or 4 h (L. minor), after which concentrations decreased. Osmotic and cadmium stresses also resulted in elevated Hsp70 concentrations in samples of F. serratus and L. minor when compared with unstressed controls. In both, osmotic and metal stress, the production of Hsp70 increased to a maximum and subsequently decreased as the stressor levels increased. Results suggest that Hsp70 IC-ELISA could potentially be applied to the detection of stress in these aquatic species, although it would probably be most effective when used in conjunction with other measurements to provide a stressor-specific biomarker profile or fingerprint.
    • An evaluation of Pennies and Pounds: A financial literacy service commissioned by Sure Start Winsford

      Davies, Sarah; Thurston, Miranda; University College Chester (University College Chester, 2005-10)
      This report evaluates the Pennies and Pounds project which supports people who have questions about any aspect of managing their money. It is run by Vale Royal Citizen's Advice Bureau and funded by Sure Start Winsford. The evaluation aims to investigate access to the services provided, describe the implementation of the service, and explore the impact of the service on its users.
    • An evaluation of Synergy: A young person's health support service

      Jones, Jenny; Perry, Catherine; Thurston, Miranda; Chester College of Higher Education (Chester College of Higher Education, 2000-06)
      This report discusses Synergy - an 'information shop' multi-agency advice and information support service for young people based in Runcorn Old Town.
    • An evaluation of the 'Living with Cancer' project: Using neuro-linguistic programming techniques to maximise the coping strategies of carers and patients living with cancer in Ellesmere Port

      Sargent, Penny; Thurston, Miranda; Kirby, Karen; University College Chester (Chester: University College Chester, 2004, 2004-03)
      The 'Living with cancer' project aimed to improve communication, relationship, and coping skills of health professionals, cancer patients and their carers in Ellesmere Port. The project delivered NLP Diploma training to 55 health professionals between April 2001-March 2004.
    • Evaluation of the Branches project: A family support service in Halton

      Artaraz, Kepa; Thurston, Miranda; University College Chester (University College Chester, 2005-07)
      The Branches project is a family support service funded by Halton's Children and Young People's strategic partnership. The study aims to explore the theoretical rationale and understanding of the service, explore professionals' understandings of 'parenting' and 'family support', analyse the experiences of service users, and explore the impact of the service on children and families.
    • An evaluation of the Cheshire and Merseyside Public Health Network 'Drink a Little Less, See a Better You' social marketing campaign

      Thurston, Miranda; Alford, Simon; Hughes, Deanna; Centre for Public Health Research, University of Chester (Centre for Public Health Research, University of Chester, 2010-07)
      Drink a Little Less, See a Better You: The NHS Health Check and Wind Down initiative is a social marketing campaign designed to reduce alcohol harm in the target group - men between the ages of 35-55 years - in the pub setting. In order to understand the impact of this initiative, the Cheshire and Merseyside Public Health Network commissioned the Centre for Public Health Research at the University of Chester to carry out an evaluation.