• An analysis of the three-dimensional kinetics and kinematics of maximal effort punches among amateur boxers.

      Stanley, Edward, R; Thomson, Edward; Smith, Grace; Lamb, Kevin L.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-09-27)
      The purpose of this study was to quantify the 3D kinetics and kinematics of six punch types among amateur boxers. Fifteen males (age: 24.9 ± 4.2 years; stature: 1.78 ± 0.1 m; body mass: 75.3 ± 13.4 kg; boxing experience: 6.3 ± 2.8 years) performed maximal effort punches against a suspended punch bag during which upper body kinematics were assessed via a 3D motion capture system, and ground reaction forces (GRF) of the lead and rear legs via two force plates. For all variables except elbowjoint angular velocity, analysis revealed significant (P < 0.05) differences between straight, hook and uppercut punches. The lead hook exhibited the greatest peak fist velocity (11.95 ± 1.84 m/s), the jab the shortest delivery time (405 ± 0.15 ms), the rear uppercut the greatest shoulder-joint angular velocity (1069.8 ± 104.5°/s), and the lead uppercut the greatest elbow angular velocity (651.0 ± 357.5°/s). Peak resultant GRF differed significantly (P < 0.05) between rear and lead legs for the jab punch only. Whilst these findings provide novel descriptive data for coaches and boxers, future research should examine if physical and physiological capabilities relate to the key biomechanical qualities associated with maximal punching performance.
    • Baseball: Myths and modernization

      Bloyce, Daniel; University College Chester (Routledge, 2004-04-01)
      This book chapter discusses the processes behind the development of baseball and in particular, the myth that baseball was invented by Abner Doubleday in 1839.
    • Coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer

      Worsfold, Paul R.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-07-23)
      Soccer clubs recruit talented youth players into their development programmes with the aim of nurturing their ability, and ultimately to develop them into professional soccer players (Carling et al. 2012). Past talent identification and development research has identified that youth players, who are then selected to play at higher standards of competition, possess greater endurance capacity (Gil et al. 2007; Reilly et al. 2000), faster sprinting performance (Le Gall et al. 2010), have faster dribbling performance (Huijgen et al. 2009) and are generally more physically advanced in comparison to players of lower ability (Gravina et al. 2008). In contrast to traditional measures, few studies have considered player development in relation to coach-player interaction. There is general agreement that coaching is a process that primarily focuses on aiding athletes in achieving their peak performance (Woodman, 1993). Therefore, the way in which a coach facilitates learning through their words and actions, which is the core principal of the coach’s instructional behavior, can strongly impact upon an athletes’ performance and progression, as well as their emotional well-being (Miller, 1992). Promoting a mastery climate, with equal opportunities and support for athletes fosters group cohesion and reduces performance anxiety through the reduction of social pressures (Smith et al. 2007). Despite the need for equality to promote team cohesion throughout the team, differentiation between feedback provided to effective and non-effective team sport players has previously been identified. In many team sports, it has been suggested that coaches observe and interact more with effective players (based upon match time), provide more feedback (instructional, positive, and negative), and give more positive evaluations within training sessions when compared to non-effective players (Markland & Martinek, 1988; Wang et al. 2001; Rosado & Mesquita, 2009). To date no research has conducted a longitudinal assessment focusing on talent development and player progression through coach behaviour analysis within elite youth soccer. Therefore, the aim of the study was to objectively analyse coaching behaviour within three playing squads at an elite level soccer club during two competitive seasons.
    • Conclusion: Figurational sociology and the development of modern sport

      Dunning, Eric; Malcolm, Dominic; Waddington, Ivan; University of Leicester ; University of Leicester ; University College Chester (Routledge, 2004-04-01)
      This book chapter discusses 'figurational' or 'process-sociology' and the history of sport.
    • Development of anthropometric characteristics in professional Rugby League players: Is there too much emphasis on the pre-season period?

      Morehen, James; Clarke, Jon; Batsford, Jake; Highton, Jamie; Erskine, Robert; Morton, James; Close, Graeme
      Rugby League is a team sport requiring players to experience large impact collisions, thus requiring high amounts of muscle mass. Many players (academy and senior) strive to increase muscle mass during the pre-season, however, quantification of changes during this period have not been thoroughly investigated. We therefore assessed changes in body-composition using Dual X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA) in eleven academy players over three successive pre-seasons and ninety-three senior players from four different European Super League clubs prior to, and at the end of, a pre-season training period. There was no meaningful change in lean mass of the academy players during any of the pre-season periods (year 1 = 72.3 ± 7.1–73.2 ± 7.2kg; ES 0.05, year 2 = 74.4 ± 6.9–75.5 ± 6.9kg; ES 0.07, year 3 = 75.9 ± 6.7–76.8 ± 6.6kg; ES 0.06) with small changes only occurring over the three-year study period (72.3–75.9kg; ES = 0.22). Senior players showed trivial changes in all characteristics during the pre-season period (total mass = 95.1–95.0kg; ES −0.01, lean mass = 74.6–75.1kg; ES 0.07, fat mass = 13.6–12.9kg; ES −0.17, body fat percentage = 14.8–14.1%; ES −0.19). These data suggest that academy players need time to develop towards profiles congruent with senior players. Moreover, once players reach senior level, body-composition changes are trivial during the pre-season and therefore teams may need to individualise training for players striving to gain muscle mass by reducing other training loads.
    • Disability and inclusion policy towards physical education and youth sport

      Smith, Andy; University of Chester (Routledge, 2008-12-08)
      This book chapter discusses UK governmental policy relating to social inclusion in sport, particuarly using of physical education and youth sport to promote the inclusion of young people with disabilities and/or special educational needs in mainstream schools.
    • Disability, sport and society: An introduction

      Thomas, Nigel; Smith, Andy; Staffordshire University; University of Chester (Routledge, 2008-12-05)
      This book discusses key themes in disability sport including disability theory and policy, the development of disability sport, disability sports in schools, elite disability sport (including the Paralymics), and media involvement in disability sport.
    • Education, Physical Education and Physical Activity Promotion

      Smith, Andy; Green, Ken; Thurston, Miranda; Edge Hill University; University of Chester; Innland Norway University (Routledge, 2017-12-18)
      This chapter examines: (i) the policy rationale for viewing education and schools as an appropriate setting for PA promotion; (ii) the apparent role PE is expected to have in fostering lifelong participation in PA and sport; and (iii) the limits of education in promoting PA given the significance of wider social inequalities in families and the wider societies of which they are a part. It is suggested that while engaging in PE may help promote PA among young people in schools, and may strengthen their sporting predispositions and biographies, whether the content, organization and delivery of curricula promotes PA often depends on the predispositions, habits and experiences that are acquired and reproduced outside of education in childhood and family contexts characterized by varying degrees of social inequality.
    • The effect of experiential anchoring on the reproducibility of exercise regulation in adolescent children

      Lamb, Kevin L.; Eaves, Simon J.; Hartshorn, James E. O. (Routledge, 2004-02)
      This article discusses a study of 41 children which was undertaken to discover whether experimental anchoring would enhance the reproducibility (test-retest reliability) of adolescent children in their ability to self-regulate their exercise output on the basis of their effort perceptions.
    • Heart rate and perceived muscle pain responses to a functional walking test in McArdle disease

      Buckley, John P.; Quinlivan, Ros M.; Sim, Julius; Short, Deborah S.; Eston, Roger (Routledge, 2014-04-14)
      The aim of this study was to assess a 12-min self-paced walking test in patients with McArdle disease. Twenty patients (44.7 ±11 years; 11 female) performed the walking test where walking speed, distance walked, heart rate (HR) and perceived muscle pain (Borg CR10 scale) were measured. Median (interquartile range) distance walked was 890 m (470–935). From 1 to 6 min, median walking speed decreased (from 75.0 to 71.4 m∙min–1) while muscle pain and %HR reserve increased (from 0.3 to 3.0 and 37% to 48%, respectively). From 7 to 12 min, walking speed increased to 74.2 m∙min–1, muscle pain decreased to 1.6 and %HR reserve remained between 45% and 48%. To make relative comparisons, HR and muscle pain were divided by walking speed and expressed as ratios. These ratios rose significantly between 1 and 6 min (HR:walking speed P = .001 and pain:walking speed P < .001) and similarly decreased between 6 and 11 min (P = .002 and P = .001, respectively). Peak ratios of HR:walking speed and pain:walking speed were inversely correlated to distance walked: rs (HR) = −.82 (P < .0001) and rs (pain) = −.55 (P = .012). Largest peak ratios were found in patients who walked < 650 m. A 12-min walking test can be used to assess exercise capacity and detect the second wind in McArdle disease.
    • An introduction to drugs in sport: Addicted to winning?

      Waddington, Ivan; Smith, Andy; University of Chester (Routledge, 2008-12-02)
      This book discusses the use of performance enhancing drugs in elite sport. It covers a history of the use of performance enhancing drugs in sport, theories of drug use, the development of performance enhancing drugs, the World Anti-Doping Agency, and case studies on the use of performance enhancing drugs in British sports, cycling, and football.
    • Introduction: History, sociology and the sociology of sport: The work of Norbert Elias

      Dunning, Eric; Malcolm, Dominic; Waddington, Ivan; University of Leicester ; University of Leicester ; University College Chester (Routledge, 2004-04-01)
      This book chapter discusses the 'figurational' or 'process-sociological' approach developed by Norbert Elias.
    • John Moores and the ‘professional’ baseball leagues in 1930s England

      Bloyce, Daniel; University of Chester (Routledge, 2007-03)
      This article discusses an attempt, inspired and mainly financed by John Moores, to establish baseball in England in the 1930s. ‘Professional’ leagues were set up in 1936 in Lancashire, Yorkshire and London. However, the English press, particularly the national press, failed to support the development of baseball in England.
    • Measurement procedures affect the interpretation of metatarsophalangeal joint function during accelerated sprinting

      Smith, Grace; Lake, Mark; Lees, Adrian; Worsfold, Paul R.; University of Chester ; Liverpool John Moores University ; Liverpool John Moores University ; University of Chester (Routledge, 2012-08-07)
      The metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) is a significant absorber of energy in sprinting. This study examined the influence of MPJ axis choice and filter cut-off frequency on kinetic variables describing MPJ function during accelerated sprinting. Eight trained sprinters performed maximal sprints along a runway. Three dimensional high-speed (1000 Hz) kinematic and kinetic data were collected at the 20 m point. Three axis definitions for the five MPJs were compared. MPJ moments, powers and energies were calculated using different filter cut-off frequencies. The more anatomically appropriate dual axis resulted in less energy absorbed at the MPJ compared to the oblique axis which also absorbed less energy compared to the perpendicular axis. Furthermore, a low cut-off frequency (8 Hz) substantially underestimated MPJ kinematics, kinetics and the energy absorbed at the joint and lowered the estimate of energy production during push-off. It is concluded that a better understanding of MPJ function during sprinting would be obtained by using an oblique or anatomically appropriate representation of the joint together with appropriate kinematic data sampling and filtering so that high frequency movement characteristics are retained.
    • Physical education, lifelong participation and 'the couch potato society'

      Green, Ken; University College Chester (Routledge, 2004-05)
      This article discusses the need to encourage continuing participation in sport and physical activity by young people through catering for their preferences through a wider range of activities in more informal and individual and small-group settings. Consequently, school PE lessons would need to focus on 'optional', recreational, lifestyle-oriented sports and physical activities, rather than competitive, performance-oriented sport.
    • The place of sport and physical activity in young people's lives and its implications for health: Some sociological comments

      Smith, Andy; Green, Ken; University of Chester (Routledge, 2005-06)
      This exploratory paper seeks, first, to offer some critical sociological comments on the common-sense, or rather ideological, claims surrounding two supposedly emerging 'crises': namely, the alleged poor health and declining sport and physical activity participation levels of young people. In this regard, it is suggested that while young people are, in fact, doing more sport and physical activity than at any other time in the past, this process has, and continues to, co-occur with other prominent social processes (e.g., rising levels of overweight, obesity and sedentariness). Second, the paper begins to make sense of this seemingly 'irreconcilable paradox' by arguing for the need to make use of a sociological perspective that views the complexity of young people's lives 'in the round' and by locating them within the particular social interdependencies or relationships in which they are inescapably involved.
    • Position specific differences in the anthropometric characteristics of elite European Super League rugby players

      Morehen, James C.; Routledge, Harry E.; Twist, Craig; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-01-05)
    • Roberts and Brodie’s Inner-City Sport: An undiscovered gem?

      Green, Ken; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-10-31)
      It may seem strange in a book about exemplars of research offering a distinctive contribution to the study of sport to describe Roberts and Brodie’s Inner-City Sport as an undiscovered gem but that is, I think, how it should be viewed. This is not to say that the study and the book that emanated from it have been entirely overlooked but, rather, that the significance of Inner-City Sport has remained largely hidden from the eyes of those having most to learn from it; namely, the many students and practitioners of school physical education (PE), sports development and the like and, for that matter, academics in these fields. If I am correct in this assertion then the significance of Inner-City Sport cannot be measured, straightforwardly, in terms of its impact upon academic understanding, let alone professional practice. Instead, its significance lies in the impact it could have on students, academics and practitioners – specifically in terms of the light the study throws upon what might be termed the ‘recipe’ for becoming ‘locked-in’ to sport.
    • Sport policy and development: An introduction

      Bloyce, Daniel; Smith, Andy; University of Chester (Routledge, 2009-08-06)
      This book discusses the development of sports policy, government involvement in sports policy, the development of community sports, school sports, elite sports development, and the development of mega-events such as the Olympic games.
    • Sports administration on the hoof: The three points for a win ‘experiment’ in English soccer

      Bloyce, Daniel; Murphy, Patrick; University of Chester (Routledge, 2008)
      This article discusses the impact of the three points for a win reform introduced in 1981 by the English Football League.