• Comparison of whole body SOD1 knockout with muscle specific SOD1 knockout mice reveals a role for nerve redox signaling in regulation of degenerative pathways in skeletal muscle.

      Nye, Gareth; Sakellariou, Giorgos; McDonagh, Brian; Porter, Helen; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia; Earl, Kate; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Brooks, Susan; Richardson, Arlan; Van Remmen, Holly; et al. (Mary Ann Liebert, 2017-12-12)
      Aims: Lack of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in homozygous knockout mice (Sod1−/−) leads to accelerated age-related muscle loss and weakness, but specific deletion of CuZnSOD in skeletal muscle (mSod1KO mice) or neurons (nSod1KO mice) resulted in only mild muscle functional deficits and failed to recapitulate the loss of mass and function observed in Sod1−/− mice. To dissect any underlying cross-talk between motor neurons and skeletal muscle in the degeneration in Sod1−/− mice, we characterized neuromuscular changes in the Sod1−/− model compared with mSod1KO mice and examined degenerative molecular mechanisms and pathways in peripheral nerve and skeletal muscle. Results: In contrast to mSod1KO mice, myofiber atrophy in Sod1−/− mice was associated with increased muscle oxidative damage, neuromuscular junction degeneration, denervation, nerve demyelination, and upregulation of proteins involved in maintenance of myelin sheaths. Proteomic analyses confirmed increased proteasomal activity and adaptive stress responses in muscle of Sod1−/− mice that were absent in mSod1KO mice. Peripheral nerve from neither Sod1−/− nor mSod1KO mice showed increased oxidative damage or molecular responses to increased oxidation compared with wild type mice. Differential cysteine (Cys) labeling revealed a specific redox shift in the catalytic Cys residue of peroxiredoxin 6 (Cys47) in the peripheral nerve from Sod1−/− mice. Innovation and Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that neuromuscular integrity, redox mechanisms, and pathways are differentially altered in nerve and muscle of Sod1−/− and mSod1KO mice. Results support the concept that impaired redox signaling, rather than oxidative damage, in peripheral nerve plays a key role in muscle loss in Sod1−/− mice and potentially sarcopenia during aging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 275–295. Innovation This is the first study to compare the molecular mechanisms and pathways that occur in both skeletal muscle and peripheral nerve of Sod1−/− and mSod1KO mice in an effort to examine the relative cross-talk and role of pre- and postsynaptic changes in redox homeostasis in loss of neuromuscular integrity and function that occurs with aging. This study highlights that impaired redox signaling in peripheral nerve rather than oxidative damage appears to play a key role in altering the integrity of peripheral nerves and motor neurons and potentially age-associated muscle atrophy and functional deficits. These results are potentially clinically significant and have widespread implications for the understanding of sarcopenia during aging.
    • MicroRNAs as central regulators of adult myogenesis and proteostasis loss in skeletal muscle ageing

      Kanakis, Ioannis; Myrtziou, Ioanna; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; University of Liverpool; University of Chester; NUI Galway (CRC Press, 2021-11-23)
      Sarcopenia (from the Greek words sarca (σάρκα) = flesh and penia (πενία) = deficiency) is considered as an age-associated disease, characterized by dysregulation of the balance between muscle hypertrophy, atrophy and regeneration, which leads to advanced loss of skeletal muscle mass and function associated with a high risk of falls and fractures in the elderly. Numerous studies in humans and animals have explored the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal aging but the detailed mechanisms that contribute to skeletal muscle dysfunction have not been yet fully elucidated. Recently, several studies have focused on the role of microRNAs as a dynamic and promising epigenetic mechanism which may regulate post-transcriptional gene expression that modulate skeletal muscle homeostasis. In this chapter, we describe the crucial role of microRNAs in skeletal myogenesis during adulthood and their association with the pathogenesis of sarcopenia linked to proteostasis loss.
    • Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

      Nye, Gareth; Sakellariou, Giorgos; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard; Jackson, Malcolm; McArdle, Anne; et al. (Nature Research, 2016-09-29)
      Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging.
    • Postnatal Protein Intake as a Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function in Mice-A Pilot Study

      Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia; Pollock, Natalie; Aljuaid, Turki; Sannicandro, Anthony J.; Alameddine, Moussira; Owen, Euan; Myrtziou, Ioanna; Ozanne, Susan E.; Kanakis, Ioannis; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; et al. (MDPI, 2022-08-08)
      Sarcopenia is characterised by an age-related decrease in the number of muscle fibres and additional weakening of the remaining fibres, resulting in a reduction in muscle mass and function. Many studies associate poor maternal nutrition during gestation and/or lactation with altered skeletal muscle homeostasis in the offspring and the development of sarcopenia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the musculoskeletal physiology in offspring born to mouse dams fed a low-protein diet during pregnancy was altered and whether any physiological changes could be modulated by the nutritional protein content in early postnatal stages. Thy1-YFP female mice were fed ad libitum on either a normal (20%) or a low-protein (5%) diet. Newborn pups were cross-fostered to different lactating dams (maintained on a 20% or 5% diet) to generate three groups analysed at weaning (21 days): Normal-to-Normal (NN), Normal-to-Low (NL) and Low-to-Normal (LN). Further offspring were maintained ad libitum on the same diet as during lactation until 12 weeks of age, creating another three groups (NNN, NLL, LNN). Mice on a low protein diet postnatally (NL, NLL) exhibited a significant reduction in body and muscle weight persisting up to 12 weeks, unlike mice on a low protein diet only prenatally (LN, LNN). Muscle fibre size was reduced in mice from the NL but not LN group, showing recovery at 12 weeks of age. Muscle force was reduced in NLL mice, concomitant with changes in the NMJ site and changes in atrophy-related and myosin genes. In addition, μCT scans of mouse tibiae at 12 weeks of age revealed changes in bone mass and morphology, resulting in a higher bone mass in the NLL group than the control NNN group. Finally, changes in the expression of miR-133 in the muscle of NLL mice suggest a regulatory role for this microRNA in muscle development in response to postnatal diet changes. Overall, this data shows that a low maternal protein diet and early postnatal life low-protein intake in mice can impact skeletal muscle physiology and function in early life while postnatal low protein diet favours bone integrity in adulthood.
    • Small-RNA Sequencing Reveals Altered Skeletal Muscle microRNAs and snoRNAs Signatures in Weanling Male Offspring from Mouse Dams Fed a Low Protein Diet during Lactation

      Kanakis, Ioannis; Alameddine, Moussira; Folkes, Leighton; Moxon, Simon; Myrtziou, Ioanna; Ozanne, Susan E.; Peffers, Mandy J.; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; University of Liverpool; University of Chester; University of East Anglia; University of Cambridge; NUI Galway (MDPI, 2021-05-11)
      Maternal diet during gestation and lactation affects the development of skeletal muscles in offspring and determines muscle health in later life. In this paper, we describe the association between maternal low protein diet-induced changes in offspring skeletal muscle and the differential expression (DE) of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs). We used a mouse model of maternal protein restriction, where dams were fed either a normal (N, 20%) or a low protein (L, 8%) diet during gestation and newborns were cross-fostered to N or L lactating dams, resulting in the generation of NN, NL and LN offspring groups. Total body and tibialis anterior (TA) weights were decreased in weanling NL male offspring but were not different in the LN group, as compared to NN. However, histological evaluation of TA muscle revealed reduced muscle fibre size in both groups at weaning. Small RNA-sequencing demonstrated DE of multiple miRs, snoRNAs and snRNAs. Bioinformatic analyses of miRs-15a, -34a, -122 and -199a, in combination with known myomiRs, confirmed their implication in key muscle-specific biological processes. This is the first comprehensive report for the DE of sncRNAs in nutrition-associated programming of skeletal muscle development, highlighting the need for further research to unravel the detailed molecular mechanisms.